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Topic: Medical professionals who love magic
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jun 28, 2008 12:22AM)
Today at the children's hospital, a newspaper was folded to the obituary of a long time patient. A child hero, who was endeared by us all in my department. Every day, the children we care for who are facing terrible circumstances, never forget they are children, and love the things all children love, and respond the way all children do. The difference with these kids is that they were dealt an unfair hand through no fault of their own, and yet they play and laugh, and pretend, and love magical things.
Aside from giving the very best professional care I know how, I have felt that I needed to give just a bit more. This I guess has always been my motivation for taking time to play with the kids, and tell silly jokes, pull coins from their ears, and sing all the versus of the Elmo song. Pocket tricks, and coins became a regular addition to my medical gear, and I now never leave home without my D'lites. God Bless Justin Styles--he's Da man!

I am pondering the notion of whether I am not also doing this for myself. Since most of what I do in working with children patients stikes the utmost fear and terror in them. Although medically necessary: IV's Labs, Lumbar punctures, Biopsies are a daily routine. The added entertainment is the ONLY thing I can do to somehow make up for the bad stuff. It is not an equitable justification by any means, perhaps simply a brief escape from reality for both caregiver, patient and family.

When the patient visit is over, and popsicles and prizes awarded, all is forgiven, and these child heroes dwell only on the fun things, as we all should I guess.

Now, I wonder if there are other medical folks who have taken up magic, or other performing art to add in the patient setting? Do you also find it mutually therapeutic?

I sincerely applaud the many here who were magicains first, and then discovered how supremely beneficial it is to perform for folks (big and small) in the hospital. I cannot leave out the Kudos for the clowns too! Your contributions to the well being of patients is invaluable! :)
Message: Posted by: Mike Melito (Jun 28, 2008 11:21AM)
I perform in a urgent care waiting room sometimes. The best part of performing is what I call it a bond of astonishment. That moment when the trick climaxes and both child and parent look at each other to ask "how did he do it?" Before the parent is concerned and the child is sick. However, in that moment of time the disease, flu, scrapes, broke bones, fever is forgotten for just a moment and now the parent and child have something else as a bond.
Message: Posted by: LarryTaylor (Jul 8, 2008 01:46AM)
You all are such wonderful people, Bless you all.
Message: Posted by: JasonbytheOcean (Jul 17, 2008 12:36PM)
I'm not a full-time medical professional, but have several relatives who are. I've volunteered with hospitals for years and served as an EMT-B for a while before picking up magic. The transition to working with a recreational therapy program a local hospital was a natural one. I don't have time to go into all of the ways I've found it mutually beneficial. Just a great experience and one I intend to pursue as long as I can.
Message: Posted by: manal (Jul 25, 2008 11:56PM)
I am an LPN in a long term care facility. I will at times perform something for the residents and I get as much out of it as they do.
However, co workers see it in a different light. Some feel it is unprofessional or inappropriate. I feel the benefits to the resident far outweighs these few persons opinion.
I now however do magic for residents only, not when co-workers are present. I will on occasion show visiting family members kids.
That said in the setting I work in due to the workload and demands on a nurses time( short staffed,unbelivable patient to nurse ratios, Incredibly long med passes, ridiculous triple documentation to cover facilities arse, dealing with families / resident behavoir, treatments, feeding, bedside and personal care,supervising other staff, transcribing orders, chart checks, developing and updating care plans , family and patient education,admission assessments, wound care , falls and incidents and the hour of filling out documents that involves ,sending residents to hospital due to serious change of staus or decline and the hour od paper work, notifying Phys. and poa's , taking phone calls, inservice meetings sheduled during shift,etc.......) in a long term care facility the magic is very infrequent.Whoops, got lost for a moment.
I have done full shows at facilities I have worked in for free on my days off.


NoVaCain, I wish more health care professionals were more like you.I have a 5 yr.old Autistic son . In addition to Autism he has other conditions requiring some of the invasive procedures you mentioned in your post.I hope more will follow your example .

Just home from a very eventfull shift,
Jim
Message: Posted by: Jaz (Jul 26, 2008 07:56PM)
NVC,
IMO you're doing magic for yourself and the patients.
You're conecting with them in a special way.

I applaud you folks.
Message: Posted by: Mitch Winkler (Jul 30, 2008 11:10AM)
I'm an adult medical oncologist in private practice and have been performing magic for my kids and friends for about 2 years now. I recently started performing for the children's ward in our hospital on weekends.

Though I periodically do tricks for my staff, I haven't performed for very many of my patients. This is mainly because of the fairly serious nature of our interactions. The patients I HAVE performed for are typically in remission and on long-term observation, and our clinic visits have a generally lighter and social feel.

I am considering branching out to perform periodically at hospices in our community, but haven't explored this very far. It's also because I seem to routine and perform most effectively for children.
Message: Posted by: gbradburn (Aug 20, 2008 01:34PM)
Perhaps you are doing it for yourself but I don't see that as a bad thing. By balancing all the "bad stuff" you're forced to inflict (for lack of a better word) on your patients with something that brightens their day, you may just be providing yourself the refreshment you need to continue to treat them.

I once read that depression is high among dentists because they daily inflict pain on their patients. I could imagine that the same might be true for you in your profession and having the opportunity to do something to balance that can only be a good thing.

I am reminded of the verse "he who refreshes others will himself be refreshed" so yes, in that sense, you are doing it for yourself as well.
Message: Posted by: Mr Deck (Sep 4, 2008 09:58AM)
Hi all this is an interesting topic for me. Before I moved to Cardiff (uk) from Sheffield (uk) I did voluntary work which involved working with men who had suffered Rape or sexual abuse as adults or children. As we know it’s a subject that is not talked about much and can often be very upsetting.

I ran a group of about 7-9 men at a time talking about how we heal and how we survive. At the end of each session I use to do some magic for them as an attention switcher. We found out later on feed back this was proven to be very successful in a lot of ways. Rather than the men going home with traumatic memories they would be thinking on how the trick was done. Ok not in every case but for them it was a big part of the healing process.

I think Magic can be used in a lot of ways some bad I.E to con people or for entertainment, but now I look at it as good attention switcher for people who find it hard at times to move on from sad memories.

Just my bit added may help someone.
Take care all
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Sep 4, 2008 08:12PM)
Another day at the hospital, and I continue to learn new reasons why I do magic there. BTW, Thanks for the excellent feedback on this subject gentlemen. Primarily, it brings a much appreciated distraction to those who have no escape otherwise. In the Children's hospital we frequently have clowns strolling to visit and entertain, but it is occasional. On rarer occasions, musicians will come by and perform, but much less often than the clowns. I have the advantage of being there the whole shift,5 days a week. Having the capability to bring a magical distraction on the fly, when it is needed most, is both a mission and a blessing. As an intregal part of my nursing practice, magic provides a special kind of relief no pharmacological agent can touch, it raises the spirit, reduces anxiety, instills joy, and demonstrates a caring relationship that goes a bit beyond the routine medical care. This is one budding magician who will keep his day job, no matter what!

Bravo Mr. Deck, even adult patients can benefit from a joyful distraction which trumps the unpleasant realities. Magic heals!
Message: Posted by: Mr Deck (Sep 5, 2008 03:20AM)
Quote: NoVaCain.
“I am pondering the notion of whether I am not also doing this for myself.”

Hi all
I have been thinking about what NoVaCain said in the line above, I am no expert on these matters but I do feel Magic is a good attention switcher when your work has added stress like working with sick children.

Someone once asked me what was the worse pain that I have ever endured, after a little thought I replied “It’s being a farther and to see any on my children suffer” Which I believe to be true seeing your own child sick and in pain for me is the worse pain I could ever endure.

I feel when working with children who are less fortunate or sick is hard on us mentally and in time may catch up with us if we don’t have an outlet /channel to suppress, control , accept our environment that we work in.

So pondering the notion of whether I am not also doing this for myself.? I think we do and there is nothing wrong in that we are all human and have feelings.

Take care all
Message: Posted by: spazm (Sep 8, 2008 08:23AM)
I am a full time medical professional with my own office. I perform tricks for the kids, staff and patients. Mostly just stuff I have in my pocket. Kind of catches them off guard. It creates a much more relaxed environment and they always come back asking to see it again. Just started working with the local Shriner club and getting ready to help with the Shriners hospitals. I feel that magic has a place everwhere. It doesn't have to be a full stage production, it can just be "pulling a quarter from the ear". It makes everybody smile.
Shane
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Sep 11, 2008 08:59PM)
Shane, if you are not already hooked, you soon could be. Once you realize how much you can do in the medical setting that uplifts and entertains your patients, you may never look at your profession the same. Perhaps more like a daily magic show with medical care on the side. I started with only a couple of amusing pocket tricks, and a simple coin thing too. Once the magic bug bit me hard.. (Lance Burton had only to fly his Corvette over my head to make me a believer).. I really began to take my magic a lot more seriously. I have elevated my personal standard to ensure that I never do magic in a half-hearted way ever again. It is my medical magic mission. The best testament I have received as a nurse, is when the kids started referring to me as "The Magician", instead of Nurse Rob.

Although it relieved many a worried parent, not a single kid ever laughed or cheered, when their IV catheter was placed in one stick..Even though that IS my best trick of all!
Message: Posted by: drpop (Sep 16, 2008 02:33PM)
I am a Paediatric Nurse in the uk. I regularly perform magic at work. At first staff thought it strange (particularly at one famous paediatric hospital), but now I am often called upon to help in challenging situations. There are many recorded benifits to laughter, and I have found magic as one route to finding that laughter. I feel if I leave work having been able to put a smile on just one childs face, then I have done my job. A smile costs nothing and laughter is remembered for a long time.
to quote Hazrat Inayat Khan 'the heart which is not struck by the sweet smile of an infant (or child) is still asleep'
Message: Posted by: Magic38 (Sep 17, 2008 01:25PM)
That's great keep up the good work. Even though you are not a famous tv magician,
in my book you are a great star. making folks feel amazed and entertained that's what magic is really about
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Sep 19, 2008 08:54PM)
Drpop, it is great to hear you resonate the same understanding of doing what we do. I find that I measure my days now by how many kids did I get the priviledge to perform for. Seeing the reactions, and how it changes the treatment experience for the patients, is a real benefit to all parties. Magic has enhanced my practice in ways I cannot yet fully appreciate. It has motivated me to keep growing in this wonderful art. It is said medicine is both a science and an art, you can guess which half I am enjoying the most! cheers.

Thanks Bill for your kind words, I hope to never have to give up my day job!
Message: Posted by: drpop (Sep 20, 2008 02:44PM)
Novacain
As a nurse I sometimes think some forget about the caring side of our profession. It is amazing what a simple magic trick or balloon animal can do to break down barriers and even assist with the provision of care.
I am glad to think that outside of the Gasundtheit insitute (where this type of thing is standard) there are other like minded professionals. I was told recently how the atmosphere in a department I work in regularly changes when I am about, I hope for the better. When I meet new staff they always say, oh your bob. My philosophy is aside from all the unpleasant things that children have to experience as part of their care, why can they not experience these things laughing, or at least smiling.
As patch adams says Laughter is the best medicine, and has no harmful side effects. Athough I did see a child laugh so much once at a clown doctor his tracheostomy blocked. The funny thing was as the staff tried to unblock it, he was pushing them aside to watch the magic.

The real magic is not the trick, but the miraculous smile it produces.
Message: Posted by: manal (Sep 22, 2008 07:21PM)
A few years back Copperfeild was involved in a project teaching/encouraging magic in pediatric wards.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Oct 1, 2008 10:06AM)
I have to share a story that taught me a great magical lesson about 3 weeks ago.

I was doing my chop routine for a 5 year old boy who had Neuroblastoma, usually a fatal form of cancer. I usually do about 3 close up effects, and close with the chop cup routine where I produce some smiley balls to give them. my close up pad is on the foot end of the gurney, and the lad was sitting indian style. He and his mother were having fun, and lots of smiles had been generated so far from an otherwise tired young boy. When I got to the part where I was about to reveal the first final load, he reached over and lifted the cup, and made the ball appear!! to my surprize, and his amazement, He lit right up! I realized that he just experienced his own magical production. He had become the magician! So I just went with it, and went on about "how in the world did you do that?!? you are Magic!!" as I casually took the cup and reloaded it for the 2nd production. When he lifted it for the 2nd time, and a bigger smiley ball appeared, the moment was PRICELESS!! I wish I had thought of this myself, but I didn't. A 5 yr old bald kid, showed me the way.

So I learned the humility and value of allowing the kids to have the finale for themselves, I am not the important one in the routine, I am just the conduit for the magic to happen in their lives, not mine.
Message: Posted by: Thought farmer (Oct 4, 2008 11:18AM)
What a great forum full of posts that show a slice of what we are here for. Keep doing what you are doing because it is plain to see how much you all get out of it.Greater still, what you give is huge even if it is to one kid at a time. Just as someone influenced you, you are influencing others for a lifetime. Thought Farmer.
Message: Posted by: manal (Oct 7, 2008 09:38AM)
And now, heres something we hope you"ll really like...

http://www.openheartmagic.com
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Oct 7, 2008 10:45AM)
Manal, that is a wonderful operation! It would be AWESOME if there were a group like that in my area.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Oct 10, 2008 02:37AM)
Some great stories, guys!

I've incorporated close-up magic as part of my family medicine practice for some 25+ years on a daily basis. I use cards, coins, malini egg bag, sponge balls, balloons, TT's and improvise with the zillions of toys that fill my rooms. In addition to my medical practice, I perform for volunteer shows for local charities.

As most of us are well aware, many patients (esp. adult men) are ashamed to be in a doctor's office in the first place. After all, John Wayne wouldn't have gone to a doctor if he were in pain - he would have sucked on a silver bullet instead! Magic is a great way to break barriers and create closer relationships with our patients. It works for all ages (I like making my seniors feel like kids again!). And, of course, the kids always look forward to seeing their "magic doc."

I also use magic as part of my patient education presentations using, for example, sponge balls to represent cholesterol molecules or magic stiff rope for discussion of hypertension or erectile dysfunction. Patients learn better when they're having fun and they remember what I tell them.

If anyone is not already familiar with it, Scott Tokar and Harrison Carroll wrote an excellent book called Side-Fx (http://www.corporatefx.com/side-fx.htm) teaching clinically relevant magic tricks for health care providers. Gotta love the cut and restored stethoscope. Highly recommended book and DVD.

Just a couple of fun medical magical experiences: I performed a fun trick for a 78 y.o. woman that was new to my practice. She liked it very much and told me that she's always enjoyed magic. "In fact, I used to work for a magician," she told me. I had to ask, of course.... Harry Blackstone, Sr! She was the girl that he cut in half on stage for 3 years. Thinking quickly, I performed another trick for her - making sure that she was an active participant in the effect. Because of this, I can proudly state that Harry Blackstone, Sr. and I shared the same magic assistant!

I enjoy creating fun effects on the spot. I recently performed signed cards to prostate and another trick that I simply will refer to as "At Your Cervix." The latter effect was a signed card that I produced while performing a PAP exam! The patients loved the tricks - it helps if you choose your subjects appropriately, I might add... (and, no additional co-pay was required!)

Finally, I want to give credit to my most recent mentor, Bob Elliott. Bob moved out here to San Diego about 3 years ago and my "game got kicked up quite a few notches." For those of you who may not be familiar with Bob, he's best known as the first teacher for many famous magicians including David Copperfield, David Blaine, Chris Angel and countless others through Tannen's Magic Camp and other venues. Bob would visit my office a few times a week and we'd go out and do magic together over lunches at local restaurants. He'd also entertain my patients while they waited to see me. Bob's given out hundreds of silver dollars to my patients over the past years (pulling the coins from out of their 'cash ears')!

In summary, my philosophy is to try and make the world a better place. A physician's job is to - essentially - comfort patients. If that involves curing them, great, but that's not always possible unfortunately. I've made house calls to my elderly patients dying at home and performed magic for them which was appreciated more than their morphine at times.

There's far too much stress out there. Injecting unexpected fun into someone's lives is a great way to get things started. I'm glad to see that others feel the same way.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Oct 13, 2008 07:57PM)
[quote]
On 2008-10-10 03:37, jocdoc wrote:


I enjoy creating fun effects on the spot. I recently performed signed cards to prostate and another trick that I simply will refer to as "At Your Cervix." The latter effect was a signed card that I produced while performing a PAP exam! The patients loved the tricks - it helps if you choose your subjects appropriately, I might add... (and, no additional co-pay was required!) [/quote]

Please tell me you let them keep the card afterward...they don't go back in the deck right?!?!? :)

[quote]



There's far too much stress out there. Injecting unexpected fun into someone's lives is a great way to get things started. I'm glad to see that others feel the same way.
[/quote]

Doc, you are my new hero! Would very much like to hear some more of your medical magic adventures!!
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Oct 17, 2008 11:13AM)
Aw, shucks.... go on - you make me blush...

Yes, they do get to keep their signed/personalized cards afterwards. If they don't want to keep their cards, we tape them to the wall of the room. People notice the cards right away and wonder why they're there - they find out pretty quickly, though.

As far as stories, no time to recount specific instances here. Suffice to say that I try to make everyday fun for my patients and staff. Also, it's not the finish of the tricks that count, it's the fun/BS on the ride to the destination (as David Kaye might put it) - i.e. the improvisation that occurs during the presentations that make them so much fun. I work with whatever happens to be lying around in the room at the time and just "go with it." I treat all ages from newborns (they're the easiest to fool!) to over 100 years old (even the worst coin vanishes work great here!) and tailor my mprov material accordingly.

I always keep quickie things in my pockets. These include:

-4 blue sponge balls (whereby they get to handle my balls during the routine)

- a small nun (how many invisible coins did you see me place in my hand? nun!)and a cigarette lighter (which one's heavier? Nope, it's the lighter!)

-money stuff: thumb tip with mismade bill, $2 to two $1 transformation, coins (silver dollar, half dollar, quarter and a penny - the latter turns into a piece of bubble gum for kids)

-Steve Draun's Real Man's Wallet for card to wallet. This also contains magical effects including B'Wave. I carry a comedy magic miniature wallet, as well.

- deck of cards (some trick decks on occasion) and rubber bands.

I may switch in fun effects on any given day depending upon my mood. Gotta keep things interesting, after all.

That's all for now - just got called to see a patient...

Make every day a FUN day!

Posted: Nov 8, 2008 12:18pm
As a follow-up to the above, I just posted pictures of my "magical" medical exam room on my web site. Go to the bottom of the page at: http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/magic.htm

One can't ever really have too many toys, can he???
Message: Posted by: ttaylor176 (Nov 11, 2008 08:32AM)
I'm a firefighter/paramedic when I go on medical calls and a child is present, I will perform a trick for them. Just like Manal said for that one brief second they forgotten all thier troubles. What a feeling it is to see thier faces light up.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Nov 12, 2008 01:13AM)
There's nothing like comforting a stressed child with magic and humor. I took care of a 10 year old girl today who just lost her hair from chemotherapy and was feeling down (and was very scared of the needles). I put clown wigs on both of us, created a mess with a confetti gun, played with some sponge balls and made her some balloon animals. It made the necessary blood draw go a lot easier. Afterwards, we took pictures of the mess that she took home with her wearing a big smile on her face!

[I'm also submitting pictures to get her a real wig from the "Locks of Love" for children where people donate their hair to make wigs for children.]
Message: Posted by: Chappo (Nov 12, 2008 08:04AM)
A fantastic thread... Though I am in no position to entertain young children (primarily a card man) it's great to see that there is some good left in the world.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Nov 12, 2008 11:16AM)
Wow Doc, nice exam room! Magic EVERYWHERE! I can see you've found the solution to prop management.

Until I discovered the purposeful use of magic, I relied on humor to help alleviate patient anxiety. I now find that the inclusion of carefuly arranged magic effects, allows me to "improvise" more effectively for each patient encounter. By having a good selection of tricks up my sleeve( in my pockets), I can respond to the moment with just the right thing. I have to be very careful though, remembering to remove my ninja rings from my pocket before entering the MRI room, it could be a career ending show for sure.

Magic is a great escape/distraction in our work. I believe it's the best reason for inspired medical care providers to study this most versatile performance art.
Message: Posted by: Wayne Kawamoto (Nov 14, 2008 01:23AM)
There's a book that presents themes to do with tricks, many of them medical. Dr. Jay Ungar, the author, is a medical doctor, a practicing internist with a specialty in geriatrics.

I thought it was very good:
http://magic.about.com/od/magicreview/fr/080306magiclife.htm

You might enjoy a recent article that talked about things that doctors can learn from magicians. You can read my thoughts about the article:
http://magic.about.com/b/2008/10/19/can-doctors-can-learn-from-magicians.htm

You can read the entire article here:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/125385.php

-Wayne
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Nov 14, 2008 01:32AM)
Thanks for posting the links, Wayne. I knew of Ungar's book, but hadn't picked it up yet.

I agree with your take on the British article. It certainly makes it seem like their doctors are akin to the old snake oil salesman (now Pop Hadyn's territory!). Magic can be very useful in our practices, but I can't think of any good doc that would purposely deceive patients in a manner such as they alluded to (I won't bring up the subject of placebo's).
Message: Posted by: Rock_Slatestone (Nov 22, 2008 05:47AM)
Hi Everyone,

This has been a great thread. Thanks for sharing your highly emotional experiences. They are beautiful.

I was just about to start approaching the local hospitals in my area to brighten the lives of others, who would you recommend I contact first? I am not familiar with job descriptions at hospitals, is there an "entertainment" coordinator?

Have a great day,

Steven
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Nov 22, 2008 12:57PM)
There are a couple of ways to go on this, Steve. My first thought was to contact the Director of Nursing, but on second thought you might want to contact the hospital's marketing/public relations director and pitch yourself to them. Anything that produces happy patients in a depressing setting is good marketing for them, after all. At the very least, they should be able to refer you to the appropriate individual.

Other thoughts: if your focus will be on children, you might call to speak with the director of the Pediatrics department. I suspect that it would be easier to get a gig with the kids than the adults.

Hope this helps. Good luck and have FUN!
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Nov 22, 2008 02:47PM)
I think it is great of you to seek out the hospital scene. If the hospital is a pediatric only facility, you should seek out the director of Child Life services, or the director of volunteer services at any hospital. Both departments are customarily directly involved with coordinating celebraties, clowns, musicians, and other philanthropic activities within the hospital setting. The management structure of many hospitals differ, and it may take some digging around to get to the right service. Once you get inside, you will find that magic that you do for these kids/patients will give you the greatest reward you could hope for. To me there is nothing more noble than to use your talents for this purpose.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Dec 16, 2008 11:33AM)
I forgot that I had written an article for docs on this subject. You can find it here: http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/Files/Documents/magic_in_medicine.doc

Hope someone finds it useful.
Message: Posted by: musicman20190 (Dec 17, 2008 06:51PM)
I started performing magic for my hospitalized adult oncology patient's about 6 years ago. This has been tremendously rewarding for my patients and myself. It breaks down so many barriers, because you are relating to the person, not just the patient. It builds trust, friendship and most importantly brings hope. I have had many patients say to me that they hope I could work the same "magic" on them. Jeff McBride offers a course each year entitled "Magic for the medical professional" I have always wanted to attend but I, like so many others, never seem to have the time.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Dec 20, 2008 12:16PM)
Nice Article Doc! I am going to begin using the cotton swab bit, it's perfect!

The magic we do for patients is as enduring as it is effective, a little side story:

The mother of a 6 yr old liver transpant patient caught me in the hall last week, while I was transporting another patient to MRI. The expression of gratitude was so profound, I was very humbled that such small diversions on my part, had such dramatic impact on others.

I had performed for her son more than a month ago while he was in my department. He was so elated by the magic that I pulled out more stuff than I usually do. Having learned that his birthday was in a couple days, I brought him some simple tricks, and sessioned with him the following week for his birthday.

The day this mom caught up with me, she had told me that they were finally being discharged after nearly 5 months in the hospital, and that over the last several weeks, how her son has cherished the magic tricks. He made a box to store his props, wrote "top secret" on it, and was performing for his doctors, nurses and anyone else he could ever since our encounter. Her eyes got teary, as she told me how much fun he'd been having being a magician, and how he went on about seeing the magic guy. Getting a little misty myself, I felt at that moment how powerful some simple magic can be.

No matter how broken the body..the spirit can be empowered by just a little kindness, and by performing a little magic at the right moments.

Magic is an awesome vehicle for reaching out to others to show you care about them.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Dec 21, 2008 12:26AM)
Beautiful story, NoVaCain.

Side Fx (by Tokar and Carroll) has many fun, easy-to-implement ideas for medical personnel. Try the cut and restored stethoscope sometime, too!
Message: Posted by: Wayne Kawamoto (Dec 22, 2008 04:47AM)
There was a recent story about Mike Walton, the founder of the nonprofit "Open Heart Magic." Once a week, he and 24 other magicians perform and teach magic to kids in five Chicago hospitals.

http://magic.about.com/b/2008/12/19/working-magic-for-sick-kids.htm

This sounds like an excellent program. Mike Walton isn't a doctor, but I thought the story might offer some insights into the subject here.

-Wayne
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Dec 22, 2008 09:52AM)
Checked out his web site - what a great program! I particularly loved the title of the upcoming March program, "Tricks are for Kids!"

Thanks, Wayne.

Posted: Dec 22, 2008 8:59pm
Before I forget, wishin' y'all a very PAPpy New Year!
http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/images/magicians/have%20a%20pappy%20new%20year.jpg
Message: Posted by: Ragnu (the O.K.) (Jan 5, 2009 04:39PM)
Wow! I'm presently between patients and was just surfing thru the Café when I noticed this thread. What a delight to see and hear all of your stories!

I've been a "Ma-z-ician" (Magician/Physician)for over thirty years and have been doing a ton of magic in my office (Internal Medicine/Geriatrics)for my patients over that time. If I'm not too far behind, and the situation is appropriate, at the end of their visit, I'll usually ask whether they'd like to see something fun, (after I'm sure that all their medical issues have been fully addressed). Most often they do! (Some, now, even preemp me and say "Doc, I'm fine; could we get to the cool stuff already.") I really believe that it really enhances our relationship. It seems to level the playing field creating a more relaxed and human atmosphere, making each of them feel special in the process. I think that the most important point is that no one ever feels medically shortchanged and the magic is perceived as the "whipped cream and cherry topping" to the visit. Interestingly enough, I don't beleive that the choice of repertoire matters that much, 'cause the real Magic is not so much in the tricks but in the relationship it creates!

By the way, if any of you are interested, there is a Magic for Medical Professionals conference at Jeff McBrides's Magic and Mystery School every November; and he has developed a specific web site blog for all of us Magic/Medical enthusiasts.

I look forward to discussing our dual passions with all of you and would love to hear how you feel magic may have enhanced your medical approach and vice versa.

Jay Ungar (MD) / Ragnu (the OK)
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 5, 2009 08:10PM)
Nice to hear from you Jay. I heard about your book, but have not seen a copy of it to look through.

To quote Jimmy Buffett, "If we weren't all crazy, we'd all go insane..." 'Nuff said?
Message: Posted by: Ragnu (the O.K.) (Jan 6, 2009 06:53AM)
Have any of you have adapted a presentation for any of your tricks to a medical theme?

I've done it with a couple of my pieces which were recently published in MUM - A way to help motivate your smoking patients quit their habit - "My Pledge Pack" in the March 2008 issue; and, in May 2008, "I.C.U.", a medical themed piece using the wonderful "WOW" card changing gimmick by Katsuya Masuda.

If any of you are interested in checking them out and don't have access to MUM I'd be happy to E-mail them to you.

My E-mail is magicju@aol.com.

All my best,

Jay
Message: Posted by: deathrisingup (Jan 6, 2009 01:36PM)
Cool thread! I'm a transfusion medicine doc at a large blood center. Started doing magic when I was a kid under an old timer in Arkansas named Colonel Seymour. Was away from it for most of my life and have gotten back into in during recent years, cards only, and primarily gambling sleights. I've found this hobby to be very beneficial in both the doctor/patient relationship as well as with the nurses and other healthcare workers I come in contact with on a regular basis. Really does a lot to break the ice and show others how down to earth some of us really are and that we're not just "out-of-touch medical robot-type thingies" (a phrase I once actually heard a patient make in reference to one of her other, presumably less approachable docs) lol.
Message: Posted by: manal (Jan 6, 2009 11:10PM)
[quote]
On 2009-01-06 07:53, Ragnu (the O.K.) wrote:
Have any of you have adapted a presentation for any of your tricks to a medical theme?

[/quote]

Yes, Harry Andersons Needle Through arm to demonstrate sterile technique for a presentation I had to do while in nursing school. I got a "B" with a written comment from the instructor stating she felt she wasn't sure the material was appropriate. I took being able to gross out a very experienced RN as a compliment.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 7, 2009 12:41AM)
[quote]
On 2009-01-06 07:53, Ragnu (the O.K.) wrote:
Have any of you have adapted a presentation for any of your tricks to a medical theme?
[/quote]

Yes, I use magic as part of my patient education talks on a daily basis. Some of the effects include:

- I'll use the "stiff rope" during my discussions on hypertension and for (obviously) erectile dysfunction, the latter also utilizes a Levitra unfolding pen as my magic wand.

- I use sponge balls to discuss lipids (different types of cholesterol) and then demonstrate how treating them makes them disappear.

- I use my color changing knives set to explain how pills dissolve in the stomach (note: my set is actually comprised of pharmacy knives with spatula blade, etc).

- To ease fear of needles, I'll occasionally do needle through balloon.

- To test vision, I'll vary effects: Danny Archer's Vision Test, sponge balls, or coin production/vanishes

I also do lots of magic just for the fun of it - I've performed signed card to prostate as well as a similar piece that I call "at your cervix" (use your imagination here). My rooms are filled with magic and props with which I use to improvise as the mood strikes me. [You've seen what my exam room looks like in a previous post.] I also perform a lot of card/bar magic effects including a variation of "The Pulse" that uses a center peek followed by me "diagnosing" their card by checking their pulse. I'll type up my patter for this at sometime in the near future - it's fun and mystifies everyone!
Message: Posted by: Ragnu (the O.K.) (Jan 7, 2009 07:33AM)
What an impressive list of material! I'd be willing to bet that your patients love you!

Now, a tough question, has the magic ever backfired on any of you or created an uncomfortable situation in the office?

It's happened a few times to me over the years; either someone felt it was inappropriate in a "medical setting", they were delayed for an appointment or for religious reasons "magic" was taboo. I apologized and moved on, but it really made me realize that I have to be especially careful about who to do this stuff for. Now, when I'm unsure, either I'll pass on performing or ask whether they have the time and would like to see something fun.

Jay
Message: Posted by: manal (Jan 7, 2009 10:13AM)
I have had co-workers that thought it was unprofessional or in appropriate.
They were, however, in my opinion to put it mildly, "quirky' people. People I would not want treating any of my family.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 7, 2009 10:49PM)
[quote]
Now, a tough question, has the magic ever backfired on any of you or created an uncomfortable situation in the office?
[/quote]

Only once and that was when I was participating in a mass athletic physical screening for a local college. Most of the kids had been waiting in line for 1-2 hours before they made it to the doctors' stations. To "wake them up" for the physical, I'd check their eyes real quick with a 10 count sponge ball routine, using blue spongeballs. I would place one blue(sponge) ball in each of their hands and ask them to keep their eyes on my balls... - well, you get the idea. Only got one complaint out of over 100 physicals (from a 19 y.o. girl). Note, I do this type of routine several times a day for my patients of all ages (altering my language accordingly) and have never had a complaint. In fact, its one of my more popular routines as they tell their friends to come see me and ask if they can hold my balls!
Message: Posted by: Justin Style (Jan 8, 2009 04:51AM)
Doc, you are soooo naughty. Bob really has had a (profound) affect on you...lol!

In all my twenty plus years working in (extreemly sensitive) hospital and psychiatric centers, I only have had ONE issue.

In a half-way house for adults, I once said..."I do this trick all over the world and it drives people crazy trying to figure it out."


I got a letter telling me that the word [i]crazy[/i] was a no-no!

other than that - it's all been good.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 8, 2009 03:23PM)
You have no idea, Justin! [Steve Youell calls me the "Lenny Bruce of Magic"]

Today reminded me of another venue for medicinal magic - the house call. I made two of them today, each to seniors that have a difficult time getting about. The first call was pretty much a straight house call with some magic thrown in at the end. The second one, however, was for one of my hospice patients and his wife. The visit was 30 minutes of their own private fun close-up show. Better than all of the chemotx in the world, in my opinion...

Posted: Jan 8, 2009 7:28pm
Quote:


The second one, however, was for one of my hospice patients and his wife. The visit was 30 minutes of their own private fun close-up show. Better than all of the chemotx in the world, in my opinion...



As an FYI for all of you docs out there, Medicare only covers 10 minutes of close-up maximum...

[For the record, I did NOT charge for the visit.]
Message: Posted by: mddkf (Jan 20, 2009 10:35PM)
Hi all,
I'm a Neurologist in Portland and I really enjoyed reading all of your experiences with magic and medicine. I've only been a magician for the past three years, but I was lucky enough to attend McBrides course two years ago. It was a great opportunity and I enjoyed meeting other docs with same hobby. Interestingly there was only one pediatrician in the group. Ragnu was one of the instructors. (Hi Jay).

I love doing rubber band magic for my patients. I wear a wrist full of bands and it often provokes questions from both patients and nurses. "what are those for?". Let me show you. Do you like magic?
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 21, 2009 01:26AM)
Welcome mddkf!

A fun effect for a neurologist to perform on patients is Bob Elliott's Sensory Control. Bob employs a large coin and demonstrates how touching certain parts of the body can effect loss of sensation so that the spectator is unable to feel the large coin touching their palm. Michael Ammar teaches this on vol 2 of his Easy Money Miracles DVD. I have a copy of Bob performing (and teaching) this during a lecture from the early 1990's. It's a large (420 MB file) so I'll have to find a way to upload it for viewing. It's a great/fun effect!

jeff in san diego

Posted: Jan 24, 2009 12:43am
Well, can't get this large file to load on my web site for some reason. If you'd like to see Bob Elliott teaching his great and funny sensory control, PM your address to me and I'll burn a copy to CD for you.

jeff in san diego
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 29, 2009 12:48AM)
OK, I managed to get the Bob Elliott video uploaded. It's a large (approx 140 MB) file of Bob teaching his Big Coin Pulse Trick (what Michael Ammar calls Bob Elliott's Sensory Control). It was recorded in the early 1990's. It's a fun routine that you should all try!

Watch it here: http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/Files/Fun/bob_elliott_big_coin_pulse%20routine.mpg
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jan 29, 2009 10:16AM)
I love the big coins. I use a jumbo penny a lot in my pedi close up, and kids go wild when they see it appear. It gets handled alot. Another great bit of business I've used is Bizzaro's "Foiled Again" it really adds a lot to the jumbo coin routine.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 29, 2009 09:15PM)
On the subject of smoking, a quick routine for your patients: http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/Files/Fun/cig%20vanish.mpg

[I suppose that one could work in cigarette through quarter in midst of routine, but my "fake" cigarette is too big for my coin. You can buy these fake cigarettes at Spencer Gifts - they emit smoke when you blow through them!]
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jan 31, 2009 11:40AM)
Nice Vanish there Doc! Say have you ever done any work with Thimbles?..I am gonna jump in and try to learn them. I'm always on the lookout for good magic I can produce from my scrub pockets.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Jan 31, 2009 09:18PM)
Thanks for the compliment. I picked up thimbles and Shoot Ogawa's DVD on the subject after attending one of his lectures. Did some work with it initially, but too many other distractions for a while. They're on my "to do" list.... (along with half a zillion other things!)

Shoot is a very good teacher - his DVD's on thimbles and on the Ninja Rings are excellent. Check them out if you've not seen them (or try to catch him perform or at a lecture). He'll be in Carlsbad, CA on Sat Feb 7th if any locals are interested.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Feb 5, 2009 07:53PM)
I am just on fire for manipulation here lately..I have Mogars thimble DVD and Digital effects book, and am working the thimble drills. My card handlings are steadily improving finally, thanks to much help from good magic friends. My mitts have never been more active, as I am constantly working either coins, cards, thimbles or balls. I don't think I'm gonna get much golf in this year.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Feb 6, 2009 09:21AM)
That's the way to do it - always keep something in your pockets to play with as the day goes along. Practice muscle passes, for example, when you have downtime or do your normal everyday tasks while palming a coin (David Roth and others' idea).
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Feb 6, 2009 08:28PM)
I loved Shoot's Ninja DVD it was easy to follow. Although It was great to study, I could not have really owned the routine without the help of Christopher Lyle who spent more than just a little time helping me perfect the moves. It is good to have friends in magic! Now if I could just find a thimble guy in my hometown..I'd be golden.
Message: Posted by: Mysticman319 (Feb 21, 2009 11:29PM)
I'm a EMT, I almost ALWAYS perform for children during our transport time to the hospital, given that I can perform my various assessments and render patient care first and/or during. If I am riding with a third provider, or it's a routine medical transport I'm doing various effects almost the entire time enroute to the facility. I am lucky that I am based (mostly) out of one local hospital and I am VERY close with a lot of the ER staff members. This allows me the chance to take an extra few minutes "finishing paperwork aka performing magic" before coming available for any children that I see in the ER. But I don't limit myself to performing just for children, I perform for most of my patients, even if I'm just using quick little lines that are used in my effect patter. The hospital and pre-hospital enviroment is wonderful for performing magic in, it suspends those moments of stress, sickness, and pain.

I've performed while giving tours of the station, doing standbys, parades, and special events. In fact, this past summer I had to chance to perform for about 30 children and 15-20 parents all crowded around the back of my ambulance doing standby for a middle school football game.

I like having the ability to get the patients mind off of the situation and inject some fun into the hospital and pre-hospital experience. It is very rewarding.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Feb 22, 2009 10:54PM)
WOW Mysticman, awesome to hear about a first responder out there performing!! The greatest thing about being a medical magician, is that when we perform it comes as a surprising relief of anxiety, or at least an added benefit to our patient contacts. Many first responders have toys or stuffed bears to help provide comfort to kids in these tough situations, as a magician you can offer a lot more than fluff!! grats and welcome to this forum, look forward to hearing more!
Message: Posted by: bosque (Mar 4, 2009 02:58PM)
Hi everybody- what a great thread. So, I'm not alone.... I didn't think so. I'm a registered nurse working at a pediatric/psychiatric facility in San Francisco. I work with kids who are severly emotionally disturbed, often having suffered abuse, neglect and in-utero exposure to drugs. One day a child was being restrained by the staff (he was attempting to injure himself), and I was able to convince him to take some medication to calm himself down by performing a coin trick my father taught me 40 years earlier. I instantly gained the child's attention and was able to help him get out of the situation he was in at the time. That day I became a magician. That was about 8 years ago. I'm still employed at the same facility and perform magic for the kids every day. To them, I'm Steve the magician more than Steve the nurse. I've branched out into library shows and magic competitions, but really I'm a magician for these special kids. Thanks for letting me share. It's good to know that others are using magic the same way.
--Steve Bosque
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Mar 5, 2009 12:35AM)
Welcome to the club, Steve. Great story!
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Mar 5, 2009 08:49PM)
Yep Steve, you've definitely seen the light.. the power of magic to help kids in a number of medical situations is amazing to me to this very day. There is no way to measure the benefits patients gain from caregivers like us, but we see it work time and time again! Magic is an awesome vehicle for making life better for those entrusted to our care. Lets keep the candle burning for other nurses and docs who have yet to see the light as we have!
Message: Posted by: Al Hastings (Mar 26, 2009 01:37AM)
If anyone is interested I wrote an article regarding Magic and The Healthcare Professional.

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.magic.secrets/browse_thread/thread/cfa1750e0e4f0b2d#

I wrote it in a public and permanent forum because I don't want my ideas to be proptery of any one -private- forum.

-Al Hastings
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Mar 26, 2009 08:14PM)
Id be interested in how to make balloon animals from latex gloves, Al. Please post the video somewhere - it sounds like fun!

jeff in san diego
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Mar 27, 2009 12:04AM)
Al, I can appreciate your reasons for the separation of nursing and magic for your personal preferences, but the negative ethical impact you describe just does not apply in all settings or situations

A cheezy hack magician is not appropriate ANYWHERE, much less a hospital, and if the part-time hack/medical professional is doing it to feed his own ego or birthday show calender, then Yes that is SSSOOooooo wrong!!

I agree, the ICU is one thing, so is the OR or other settings which clinical focus must be maintained. I would hope the Medical Professional is smart enough to know when the use of magic as a distraction is therapeutic or not.

In pediatrics, there is much more leeway for age appropriate distraction: music, arts, crafts, clowns, and yes even magic. Pediatric medical staff should know how to interact appropriately with patients of all developmental levels, and properly employ stress relieving techniques. Non-pharmicalogical anxiolysis is not only good medical practice, but healthy and highly desireable for our patient populations. The benefits are well documented. In fact there are child life specialists, recreational thereapists, music therapists, and others who focus on helping patients cope with stress within the hospital.

Doctors and nurses are not out of their scope if they incorporate similar techniques in their practice. Magic, applied appropriately, by skilled and compassionate caregivers, enhances the patient experience when you can make them laugh and smile!
Message: Posted by: bosque (Mar 31, 2009 07:58PM)
Well spoken, Rob.
--Steve
Message: Posted by: bwarren3 (Apr 8, 2009 05:59PM)
Hey Guys,
I just found this thread... I work in a very large 8 hospital system, I used to teach Physicians over 21 different computer systems but have moved over to a PACS site Coordinator, the guy that takes care of all of the digital Imaging. When Copperfield first started Project Magic A guy named Rory & I were 2 of the first magicians to jump on that and we had a blast taking it to the hospitlas. We have a children's hospital real close by and they pretty much give me an open door policy. Lots of times I would get a call from one of the pediatric physicians or surgeons to come on over and bring my bag of tricks..
Then years later project Magic kinda died out & Kevin SPencer pushed out Healing with magic, basically the same program without the politics.
When I was at the largest hospital it was right next door to the children's hospital with a cross-over in the middle of the 2 buildings. That got used on a weekly basis but now I'm an hour and a half away. I'm thinking it would be great to get the new SAM assembly with all of it's new members to come together and do a show for the kids....The CHKD changed the visiting kids rules to have to be 18 which cut out a lot of our kids in the SYM assembly.
This is a really great thread and hope it continues to roll along and gather new members.

Bill
Message: Posted by: lozey (Apr 20, 2009 12:59PM)
Im EMT-A and work around hospitals all the time. Unfortunatly it seems that magic, baloon models ect seem to be regarded as vastly inappropriate in the places that I work. It seems that its regarded as 'showing off'. Its a real shame
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Apr 29, 2009 12:39AM)
Howdy Bill, Welcome to the thread! I would really like to get involved in a program like project magic, in my area..I am hoping to promote the use of therapuetic magic distraction, and teaching to patients and other caregivers.

Lozey, nice to see another first responder in this thread. I was an ER trauma nurse, and have many EMT friends. Welcome!
Message: Posted by: DougTait (May 4, 2009 02:50PM)
On a similar note, Kevin and Cindy Spencer ----- "The Spencers" [url]http://www.spencersmagic.com/[/url] have an occupational and behavioral therapy program called "Healing of Magic".

It is is geared more towards using magic as therapy, but it is worth taking at peek at: http://www.magictherapy.com/index.html

To all, keep the magic flowing.

Doug
Message: Posted by: Turk (Jun 6, 2009 01:13PM)
[quote]
On 2008-10-01 11:06, NurseRob wrote:
I have to share a story that taught me a great magical lesson about 3 weeks ago.

I was doing my chop routine for a 5 year old boy who had Neuroblastoma, usually a fatal form of cancer. I usually do about 3 close up effects, and close with the chop cup routine where I produce some smiley balls to give them. my close up pad is on the foot end of the gurney, and the lad was sitting indian style. He and his mother were having fun, and lots of smiles had been generated so far from an otherwise tired young boy. When I got to the part where I was about to reveal the first final load, he reached over and lifted the cup, and made the ball appear!! to my surprize, and his amazement, He lit right up! I realized that he just experienced his own magical production. He had become the magician! So I just went with it, and went on about "how in the world did you do that?!? you are Magic!!" as I casually took the cup and reloaded it for the 2nd production. When he lifted it for the 2nd time, and a bigger smiley ball appeared, the moment was PRICELESS!! I wish I had thought of this myself, but I didn't. A 5 yr old bald kid, showed me the way.

[b]So I learned the humility and value of allowing the kids to have the finale for themselves, I am not the important one in the routine, I am just the conduit for the magic to happen in their lives, not mine.[/b] (Emphasis supplied by Turk)
[/quote]

This is a wonderful thread, and, reading NurseRob's above story, made my day.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jun 23, 2009 09:32PM)
Thanks for the kind words Turk. Working in a pediatric hospital has been a real blessing for my journey in magic. There is no better purpose for magic than to make these kids forget about their troubles for a time.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Aug 1, 2009 11:45PM)
Anyone have any new stories to tell.. we've been really busy this summer so far...I've learned to move faster, and tighten my routines more. More RN's are calling me out to perform for their patients too..I am surprised my co workers continue to endulge my oddities so regularly.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Aug 9, 2009 05:38PM)
Ditto, Rob. Very busy over the past few months.

As I have been making "magic" housecalls to some of my elderly patients over the years, I decided to kick it up a notch and create a formal program, in conjunction with my local hospice. It's called "The Magic of Hospice" whereby I (or some friends) visit hospice patients at their homes (or wherever) and perform close-up/comedy magic for them. We usually end up doing about an hour. It's a lot of fun and extremely rewarding. For some pictures and info on this program, go to http://www.medicine-in-motion.com/magic_of_hospice.htm

Hope y'all are having a fun summer (despite working so hard)!

jeff in san diego

p.s.

On an unrelated matter, I will be working as a volunteer physician for the Sorcerer's Safari Magic Camp in Ontario for one week at the end of this month! Can't wait!
Message: Posted by: jbrealmagic (Aug 10, 2009 05:37PM)
Hello,

I'm a Respiratory Therapist and incorporate Magic when appropriate.

Being that I was a full time professional Magician before I got into Respiratory, Magic is much more rewarding now used as a depression breaker with my Patients. jbrealmagic
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Aug 10, 2009 10:34PM)
Welcome to the Café JB, glad to have you in this forum as well. You are among friends here!!

Doc, your hospice housecall program looks fantastic. I am so impressed by your courage to take your magic to this patient population. My hat is off to you Jeff, once again you are my medical magic hero!! I think the emotional toll would be a lot higher for the magician, but what an awesome gift to give!

I haven't been to camp in decades, nary a magic one at that...sounds like a great time!
Message: Posted by: bosque (Aug 11, 2009 03:05PM)
Hi, everyone!
Yes, it's been busy, but I guess that's not such a bad thing. Anyway, as far as stories go, this morning while passing morning medications I came to a child who has just recently been admitted to our facility and was depressed and agitated and had 30 minutes earlier made a suicide attempt (more of a gesture, or attention-seeking behavior, nonetheless concerning). Staff thought I would have trouble administering her medication, however, after doing my chop-cup routine and card to cell phone, she took her meds, let me treat some wounds on her arm, and let me teach her 2 simple tricks. In the long run, I don't how therapeutic the magic will be, but for the moment, she was amazed and absorbed in something mysterious and challenging and safe. I use magic everyday, and get as much or more out it than my clients.

--Steve Bosque
Message: Posted by: 55john55 (Sep 4, 2009 06:49AM)
I'm not in the profession, but reading these posts has been inspiring! Thanks.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Oct 2, 2009 07:58PM)
Hi again medical magic threaders...been missing the green room a lot lately. I will be going to Boston this week for a conference of the American College of Emergency Physicians. I may try to share some medical magic ideas if I have the fortune of meeting Doctors who have an inkling for magic appreciation. We'll see.

check out my pal Shel the escape artist on my You tube channel: MetroplexMagic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS1ueBY59ZM

he may also be seen in the upcoming release by Mario Morris on the Busking school DVDs soon to be released. It has been a real priviledge and honor to work with such a dedicated street performer as my friend SHel. Magic has been a great outdoor adventure for me, as we 've been takin it to the streets when not in the hospital. I hope we have an even greater season in 2010.

Oh if you all are twittering, you can follow my tweets I'm: MagicNurseRob
Message: Posted by: absoulute (Oct 12, 2009 02:14AM)
Awesome stuff Rob! I am also a firefighter/paramedic who performs magic on occasions to help patients keep their minds off certain things. It is a great distraction for patients
Message: Posted by: tnmagicgator (Dec 28, 2009 06:49PM)
NurseRob,
Just happened to see this post after making one earlier today about performing at my local hospital. What an impressive array of repsonses and ideas. Thank you for the original posting that has spured all of this discussion. I know from personal experience that my heart is filled with joy, compassion and love whenever I perfrom at the hospital or nursing home. I've often driven home with tears brimming in my eyes. May God bless you and all those who perform and bring smiles to the faces for those in need.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Feb 19, 2010 10:39PM)
Came up with another spontaneous bit of medical magic today. I was treating a child with urticaria and wanted to demonstrate dermatographism to the mom. I traced an Ace with a diamond next to it using reflex hammer handle. Then forced the card on mom and the prediction slowly revealed itself on her daughter's arm. It was a fun way to teach this sign!
Message: Posted by: Jay (Aug 5, 2010 11:25AM)
Hi everyone! I just found this thread and hope to revitalize it a little bit. My name is Jay and I have been a Registered Nurse for 13 years, and a magician for 9 years. I have been combining the two for those 9 years as well.

I work in an acute physical rehabilitation hospital, and interact with people who have Spinal Cord Injury, Brain Injury, Stroke, Amputation, & joint replacements. My specialty is Spinal Cord Injury, although for the past few years I have been an administrator in the hospital and no longer have direct patient care responsibilities. The good news is that switching from scrubs to a suit and tie means more pockets :)

I attended Jeff McBride's very first "Magic for the Medical Professional" conference in 2005, and he still refers to me as "New Jersey's best Nurse Magician." I am quite certain that I am the only nurse magician he knows from NJ, but I'll take it!

Thank you all for sharing your stories on this thread, and others. I am inspired by your words and I also love the feeling that magic creates between me and my patients, their families, my staff, and anyone else who happens to be around.

Keep up the great work, and I hope that we can continue to add to this thread with tips, effects, and words of encouragement for our colleagues who, for whatever reason, have not begun their medical/magical journey but want to.

Jay
Message: Posted by: MrHoudini666 (Aug 20, 2010 12:00AM)
Hmm, not sure if I count... but I hope to enter medical school one day. I am a Mentalist.
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Sep 12, 2010 05:53PM)
Mr. Houdini666 - That may be a plus - you'll find that most medical complaints in a primary care office are psych issues (whether obvious or not)!
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Sep 12, 2010 05:56PM)
I was reminded the other day that this thread has often focuses on performing for patients. However, the other day while rounding I did several impromptu close-up shows for the floor staff in the "units". The nurses, respiratory techs, etc all work hard in a stressful environment. It's a good feeling knowing that I could get them to laugh so hard and amaze them at the same time. Good stress reliever for them! I strongly recommend getting these hardworking staffs involved with your magic as well.
Message: Posted by: sthielman (Oct 17, 2010 07:09AM)
Has anyone read the Jay Ungar Book Bringing Magic to Life? If so, how useful was it?
Message: Posted by: Paul Draper (Nov 8, 2010 09:12PM)
Wonderful finding this thread on The Magic Café!

Yesterday I spoke at the McBride Mystery School before his class "Magic for Medical Professionals" and one of the MD's told me about this thread!

:-)

I have a new series of lectures for medical professionals where I combine my background as an Anthropologist and culture expert with the life lessons that I have learned as a professional Vegas Magician/mentalist.

We talk about Communication, Motivation and Change through interactive games and learning simple Magic tricks.

This is a relatively new program for me called "Helping Hospitals Heal" and I would love your thoughts on it. So far I have spent a few weeks with Martin Memorial Health Systems in Florida, IHC in Salt Lake City, VHA SE in Alabama and will soon be working with some campuses in Chicago and Montana.

The book will be coming out this year :-)

Thank you for your thoughts and time!

Paul Draper
http://www.helpinghospitalsheal.com
Message: Posted by: magicguy72 (Nov 12, 2010 11:26PM)
I've spent the evening reading through the posts in this thread. It is inspiring to see so many people share their time, energy, and talents with others.

Years ago when we first started HEALING OF MAGIC - with the support and encouragement of Project Magic, David Copperfield, and Julie DeJean - a reporter wrote a great line that has become our "moto":

"Magic wands don't always belong with black hats and rabbits. Sometimes they belong in hospitals where frail hands learn tricks and the magic - the real magic - is in the healing."

This fall I have had the great privilege of conducting several Continuing Education Workshops for therapists and physicians as we toured with our show. This aspect of my work is one of the most significant and meaningful things that I do. I can tell from the posts on these pages that those who have participated in similar projects know that what we experience has such an impact in our own lives.

My exposure to therapists and patients in hospitals led me to work children with Sensory Integration Disorders, EBD, those on the autism spectrum, and dozens of other challenges. I became so intrigued with these kids that I have spent the last 2 years researching and writing a new program called HOCUS FOCUS. It is currently in the hands of about 35 researchers in several countries.

It has been an exciting, frustrating, challenging, and totally encompassing experience. I've learned so much I'm not sure I can put it all into words. But I'm hopeful that the program will help a lot of children.

In the coming weeks, I'll be heading to Hong Kong to speak at the East Asian International Conference on Teacher Education Research. And next summer, I'll be addressing the participants of the International Conference on Special Education in Namibia, Africa. I'm humbled by the opportunities and enthusiastic about the possibilities.

All I can say to everyone is Keep Up The Great Work! It is an incredible thing that you are all doing!

Kevin
http://www.SpencersMagic.com
http://www.MagicTherapy.com
Message: Posted by: jocdoc (Nov 26, 2010 11:17PM)
Jay's book is very good. Lots of good content and I like his writing style. I'd recommend it and Scot Tokar/Harrison Carroll's Side Fx.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Mar 25, 2011 10:42PM)
Hi Again magic friends! Its been a long time away from the forum for me, but I am back for a quick update. I am not working full time in the hospital any longer, and am now a Clinical Director for a medical software company specializing in emergency medicine. This career fell into my lap unexpectedly through some side consulting I was doing, and the deal was too good to pass up. There was a major downside to leaving the hospital though, which I struggled with for a long time: I was no longer caring for patients, and doing what I loved. Magic took a back seat, and was demoted to hobby status, and not a very active one at that. My new career has enhanced my life greatly, no question, but my motivation for doing magic was gone as a result.

Until recently, when through some old contacts, I was asked to be a camp nurse at a special weekend camp for medically challenged kids. GAME ON for The Magic Nurse!! After a year of no magic, I dusted off the best of what I knew and jumped right back in. This led to an additional opportunity to perform and teach a magic class at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas, where I will be returning as often as I like to demonstrate therapeutic magic effects geared at empowering kids with mobliity impairments, to learn and perfom magic. My first class was this week, and it could not have gone better. Though I still miss the trenches of patient care, I now have a reason to wake up and practice my double lift again.

I want to thank my dearest friends Christopher Lyle and Shel Higgens for their continuing support and magical mentoring, even through the dry spells. Good magic friends are awesome to have!
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (May 9, 2011 09:48AM)
Today I'm helping physicians train on our software in the ER of a Tuscon hospital. I will of course be interspersing my techno speak with some useful magic effects for those who are receptive. My favorite effect for use with physicians is what I call the "universal multi cultural Wong-Baker pediatric pain scale detection meter" Which uses the smiley faces hot rod paddle which I give them afterwards. It is a great opener to begin a meaningful dialogue in the use of magic in the clinical practice setting. It's going to be fun playing in an ER again for the week.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jun 21, 2011 11:33PM)
Where have all the magical medical professionals gone? I blame ObamaCare!
Message: Posted by: ThinkThurston (Aug 31, 2011 10:47PM)
I'm hoping to add some stories for this thread in the future; for now I wanted to say Thank You and congratulation to all of you compassionate people. You inspire me.
Message: Posted by: FranciscoDancon (Sep 4, 2011 01:07AM)
I'm a medical student, and I became really interested in doing magic during my pediatrics rotation (which I am still doing). Even though I hate pediatrics with a serious passion, I still like bringing a smile to the faces of my patients. It is not only a stress reliever for them, but it is also a serious relaxer for me. So, I'm working on a variety of the card found in an orange trick, and I'll present it to all my colleagues on call in the next week.

I've thought about going to the medical school anatomy lab to do a very disturbing version of a found card trick....like....card magically found in a brain.....and putting that on youtube. But ultimately I decided against that because it has the potential to create controversy, and I don't want any of that :-/. Even though it would be pretty awesome to load a card into a brain!
Message: Posted by: JasonbytheOcean (Sep 6, 2011 03:09PM)
Francisco,

I can't recall the name of the fellow who did it, but I recall seeing an amazing video demonstrating the power of robotic surgery. He had someone pick a card, then surgically peeled the grape on camera with the robot, revealing a very tiny card hidden underneath. Absolutely astonishing! Maybe you can try something like that, still amazing but a lot less graphic than what you suggested?
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Sep 14, 2011 02:08PM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-04 02:07, FranciscoDancon wrote:
...I've thought about going to the medical school anatomy lab to do a very disturbing version of a found card trick....like....card magically found in a brain.....and putting that on youtube. But ultimately I decided against that because it has the potential to create controversy, and I don't want any of that :-/. Even though it would be pretty awesome to load a card into a brain!
[/quote]

grossing me out a little there doc..
Message: Posted by: MagicDr (Dec 27, 2011 05:01AM)
[quote]
On 2011-09-04 02:07, FranciscoDancon wrote:
I'm a medical student, and I became really interested in doing magic during my pediatrics rotation (which I am still doing). Even though I hate pediatrics with a serious passion, I still like bringing a smile to the faces of my patients. It is not only a stress reliever for them, but it is also a serious relaxer for me. So, I'm working on a variety of the card found in an orange trick, and I'll present it to all my colleagues on call in the next week.

I've thought about going to the medical school anatomy lab to do a very disturbing version of a found card trick....like....card magically found in a brain.....and putting that on youtube. But ultimately I decided against that because it has the potential to create controversy, and I don't want any of that :-/. Even though it would be pretty awesome to load a card into a brain!
[/quote]

You can dress it as a mentalism trick : P
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (May 3, 2012 01:20AM)
I thought it would be good to revive this thread with an update. I have been back to camp and was magic nurse for some very appreciative kids with complex medical condition at camp John Marc this spring, and will be going again in June. I really enjoying the camp experience, teaching magic to great kids: empowering them to perform new skills, in spite of their medical challenges.

I wish especially to thank Christopher Lyle for joining me last Saturday to entertain kids with Spina Bifida at a special event for them held by the Spina Bifida Association of North Texas. The kids and their families were so thrilled by your performance, and I am so blessed to have you as my friend!
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jun 29, 2012 08:50AM)
A lot is happening lately in my quest to bring magic to patients, please help with quick visit to my website and follow the link to cast your vote to help me qualify for a grant. here is a link to a recent show put on by the Spina Bifida kids at a summer camp magic class I held 2 weeks ago. Please help me continue to empower these patients by supporting me with your vote: http://youtu.be/MmPHWsZA2oo


It is crunch time and this is my last chance to get votes for a chance at a grant to help my MagicNurse.com mission to help pediatric patients through the performing arts. I need 169 more votes before midnight Saturday to stay in the running. Please help and pass on to your friends. Go to http://www.missionsmallbusiness.com for more details.
Thank you so much, and Bless you for helping!

1. Go to http://www.missionsmallbusiness.com/
2. In the lower right-hand corner, click on Log In & Support
3. A box will pop up - select Log In With Facebook (or equivalent)
4. The Small Business Vote page will appear. Scroll to the bottom
5. Type Magicnurse.com in the search box and hit Enter
6. MagicNurse.com shows up. Click Vote to the right of that
7. All done. You can then "share" your vote and let others know about it.
Message: Posted by: Ikswonilak (Jul 15, 2012 07:55AM)
This is a great thread. I'm a primary care care doc and have been a long time fan of magic. Finally got back into it about a year ago but still with limited performing chops... I wondered about bringing magic into my work (primarily underserved patients with a focus on primary care for mentally ill patients). Any thoughts on appropriate effects for those with severe mental illness? (Probably not a good idea to do too much mentalism/mind-reading with a patient with active schizophrenia!)

Cheers.
Aaron
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jul 27, 2012 08:32AM)
Hi Aaron,
I think anything you do to entertain your patients to bridge the caring gap is worthwhile! Find close up tricks that you enjoy most, then try them on your patients. Try to make the story relevant if possible, but having a nice story that has a positive ending leaves the patient with a feel good moment. I like Tricky paddles with the rabbit in the hat, then I give the prop to the patient to keep. I present it with a little story progression. It is a small act of kindness when you diverge a little from the medical interview to present an effect, and leaves a lasting impression of compassion. You will enjoy your days more when you can perform and have a little fun in your work!
Message: Posted by: Christopher Lyle (Aug 3, 2012 01:36AM)
[quote]
On 2012-05-03 02:20, NurseRob wrote:
I thought it would be good to revive this thread with an update. I have been back to camp and was magic nurse for some very appreciative kids with complex medical condition at camp John Marc this spring, and will be going again in June. I really enjoying the camp experience, teaching magic to great kids: empowering them to perform new skills, in spite of their medical challenges.

I wish especially to thank Christopher Lyle for joining me last Saturday to entertain kids with Spina Bifida at a special event for them held by the Spina Bifida Association of North Texas. The kids and their families were so thrilled by your performance, and I am so blessed to have you as my friend!
[/quote]

I just saw this...

You're very welcome! :)
Message: Posted by: Braaainz (Aug 22, 2012 03:42PM)
I'm a registered nurse, usually emergency/trauma and also specializing in vascular access. Due to the hospitals being more and more latex free, I recently stopped doing any rubberband magic in them.

Little kids still love the Slydini Toilet Paper Trick... and I started keeping a thumbtip on hand.
Message: Posted by: JonesingForTruth (Sep 7, 2012 03:22AM)
Thumbtips were my former RN Girlfriend's best friend... Thanks so much to all of you for everything you do.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Oct 3, 2012 09:53AM)
Sorry I've been away for a bit. I took a humanitarian clown trip with Patch Adams as part of a group of clowns from all over the world to clown in some very distressed environments in Costa Rica. We clowned in a very poor community of Nicaraguan immigrants settled near the City Dump, a childrens hospital, the state psychiatric facility and the prison. check out my photo gallery: http://www.magicnurse.com/apps/photos/

now I am ready to focus on bringing my clowning closer to home!
Message: Posted by: Ikswonilak (Oct 14, 2012 08:05PM)
Can you share more about how things went at the Psychiatric facility, NurseRob?

I'm curious to know how magic effects go over with that type of patient population in particular and am interested in bringing magic to folks in group homes for the mentally ill but do wonder about how to "appropriately" do this...

AK
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Nov 16, 2012 11:15PM)
I had one encounter with a woman who was somewhat catatonic with her hands tied with linen ties to the arms of her wheel chair. She was parked away from the other patients in an outside open area. When I approached her she smiled, so I began to interact with her in clown. I juggled my Dube juggling scarves and she watched with interest. I then placed a scarf in each of her hands and began exchanging the scarves between her and I in a juggling pattern, hence making a restrained psychiatric patient part of the juggling act. I could not help but think to myself (in that moment)That through clowning, I have freed her a little bit from her bonds, even if just in her imagination. In those moments while we juggled together, we both escaped the loony bin, and ran away to the circus together. I had many other special moments of discovery, and connected on a human level without the benefit of common language or mental capacity. Love truly is a universal language, where sanity is not required.
Message: Posted by: Granger (Dec 15, 2012 03:19AM)
A very useful thread to read upon! I am a dentist myself and I certainly learned a lot here! Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Ikswonilak (Dec 21, 2012 02:32PM)
Wow, Rob. Finally got back to this thread. thanks for sharing this very touching story. You are so right about connecting with folks.

I'm getting closer to putting together a small show (maybe 30 minutes) that I want to present at local group homes for the mentally ill. I think there's just something wonderful human (and humane) about bringing this kind of entertainment and wonder to folks who otherwise have no access to live performance and engagement.
Message: Posted by: jcrabtree2007 (Feb 4, 2013 03:21AM)
I'm an ER RN. We get a lot of kids that come to the ER and many are scared. A little magic can really make them feel comfortable with me and the other staff. I have a pen for recap, a coin in my pocket, a rubber band - I am set.
I get a lot of people who come back to the ER and ask for me to be their nurse.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Feb 17, 2013 10:42PM)
[quote]
On 2013-02-04 04:21, jcrabtree2007 wrote:
I'm an ER RN. We get a lot of kids that come to the ER and many are scared. A little magic can really make them feel comfortable with me and the other staff...
[/quote]

That is Awesome!!! I did ER for 12 years before went into pediatrics to chill out. I reduced my stress and increased my clinical magic as a result. My hope is to now spread the word about how close up magic can help clinicians with their patients, AND combat their own stress by using this performance art in their workplace!! Keep it up Brother!! check out my website http://www.magicnurse.com for more details on my approach to magic nursing.
Message: Posted by: Pseph Choy (Feb 18, 2013 11:41PM)
Hi Rob and friends on this thread! Very happy to find this thread. I'm in medical school and was lucky to take a seminar with a physician/magician on magic and medicine. I very much believe that magic can be a powerful tool to comfort patients. Moreover, I also believe that magic can inspire those of us in the healthcare professional alliance. I saw a nurse with an ace of hearts on the back of his hospital ID badge... he told me that a young patient of his performed magic with it and he carries it as a reminder of the importance of his work. My professor has taught me to think about how the extensive amount of practice, control of environment, and empathetic attention to our audiences as magicians can powerfully and positively be applied to our care for patients. I'm very excited to be part of both fields of magic and medicine with you!
Message: Posted by: DanielCoyne (Mar 6, 2013 07:42PM)
When I started cultivating my interest in magic, I had no idea I'd be posting on this thread. But a few years (and huge career change) later, and here I am an R.N. about to start my first nursing job! I'll be working with youth, so I'm sure I'll have some opportunities to break out a few effects.

Wish me luck!

— Daniel
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Mar 11, 2013 09:13AM)
[quote]
On 2013-03-06 20:42, DanielCoyne wrote:
When I started cultivating my interest in magic, I had no idea I'd be posting on this thread. But a few years (and huge career change) later, and here I am an R.N. about to start my first nursing job! I'll be working with youth, so I'm sure I'll have some opportunities to break out a few effects.

Wish me luck!

— Daniel
[/quote]

WOW....WOW...Really that is Awesome Daniel!! You are going to experience the power of clinical magic, when you see how effective it is in reducing patient anxiety and creating a better patient care experience. I am so thrilled for you. PLEASE post your experiences here in this thread. YOU are going to have some GREAT stories to share!!!
Message: Posted by: hail_to_the_victors (Aug 6, 2013 06:27PM)
Hi all!
So...I'm a 31 year old male nurse, and I absolutely love using magic as a tool at work. As a hospice nurse I care for those who are dying. Sometimes magic is a simple tool I can use to rid the grieving patient or family member of the severity of the challenging situation...even if only for a brief moment. Magic can take them back to their childhood days even though the end is near. I'm thinking of volunteering at the University of Michigan hospital just to do magic. Love you guys!
Message: Posted by: dykstraj99 (Oct 5, 2013 08:41AM)
I'm a fp doc. I think connecting with people is the most important thing. I think the trend of medicine is moving away from that and treating people as numbers. We need to fight that and keep humanity in medicine. Magic is a great way to do that. It helps me enjoy my job and help my patients feel like real people and not just a number.
Thank you to all who try to keep humanity in medicine!
Message: Posted by: Digitalyosh (Dec 19, 2013 07:37AM)
I've been working in an outpatient pharmacy in a medical center and have seen many parents come in with their kids bored and screaming, I can see it in the parents eyes that they wish they could get the kids to stop misbehaving. I normally walk up to the window if things are slow and ask the parents if their child would like to see a magic trick. There hasn't been a time when the parents said no. I pretty much do CMH and finish off with Hanson Chein's Touch and give them the rubber bands as a souvenir. Making not just the parents but the kids feel a sigh of relief makes my day whenever I get a chance. I understand that patients have been in the urgent care or ER for hours at a time or just being discharged from the unit, and the small amount of magic makes them forget all of it just for that one moment and I think it's worth it to bring some kind of amazement to a family that's just been through a lot.
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jan 9, 2014 10:58PM)
I am back for another quick update. I am now working clinically in a pediatric day surgery unit at Baylor Our Children's House, while I continue to build my clinical entertainment business: http://www.MagicNurse.com I am back to performing close up magic for my patients as part of my nursing practice. It really has had an impact on surgery patients and their families. performing a trick or two in pre-op is a fantastic way to distract and alleviate fear and anxiety. Then a finale performance upon discharge sends our folks home happy, knowing that we cared for them giving our best care performance. It just plain works.

on another note:

After graduating from clown school with the New York Goofs, and taking the clowning trip with Patch Adams, I developed a tramp clown character and began working as a professional clown: http://www.Trampclown.com . My master plan was to introduce the art of clowning into my skill set so that I may also include therapeutic clowning into my practice. I hope to report on my progress in this effort soon. I have found that the clown has universal appeal where magic may not be able to reach. As a "Clinical Performance Artist" adding clowning opens new doors. Hospital clowning as a therapeutic profession is gaining strength in healthcare settings throughout the world. There are degree plans in Therapeutic Clowning which combine courses in nursing and theatrical arts to prepare clowns for this specialized work. We are so fortunate to have one of the top rated programs right here in Dallas/Ft Worth.

Please keep adding your stories and experiences here. I will try to better attend and share more soon.
Take care and God Bless you guys who are sharing your talents with those who need it most!
Message: Posted by: thementalcoach (Jan 15, 2014 06:39PM)
[quote]
On 2014-01-09 23:58, NurseRob wrote:
...I am back to performing close up magic for my patients as part of my nursing practice. It really has had an impact on surgery patients and their families. performing a trick or two in pre-op is a fantastic way to distract and alleviate fear and anxiety...
[/quote]

Very nice! Adding some positive distraction (and maybe sneak in a positive suggestion of a great outcome) is a good thing to do. I worked as a US Navy Hospital Corpsman in the hospital, clinics and ER, I learned that helping alleviate fear and anxiety, as you say, is a wonderful gift to give.

Please keep us posted.
Message: Posted by: Ray Bertrand (Jan 21, 2014 10:43PM)
Keep on giving. The rewards are priceless.

Ray
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (Jul 28, 2014 08:38AM)
I have recently learned of a non profit magic organization in Chicago: http://www.openheartmagic.org/ I hope they have much success. I would like to see more of these programs get traction in hospitals around the country.
Message: Posted by: FatherWilliam57 (Nov 2, 2014 05:18PM)
This thread has been a wonderful read. When I did my clinical pastoral education at Hershey Medical Center during seminary, I was assigned to the pediatric ward and the heart transplant ward. I am always pleased to see the holistic approach applied to the art/science of medicine. Patients are people! Please, please, please keep up the exceptional work...and Well Done!
Message: Posted by: Magic Oli (Nov 6, 2014 05:50AM)
I'm doing my high school finals at the moment and have always wanted to be a doctor but also a magician. I can't wait to be able to help and give wonder to the people in need :D
Message: Posted by: 55Hudson (Nov 7, 2014 06:41PM)
[quote]On Jul 28, 2014, NurseRob wrote:
I have recently learned of a non profit magic organization in Chicago: http://www.openheartmagic.org/ I hope they have much success. I would like to see more of these programs get traction in hospitals around the country. [/quote]

This year Open Heart Magic will help over 7,300 sick children deal with the stress of being in the hospital. This is an organization with only a few on staff and over 100 volunteer magicians visiting hospitals on a weekly basis. Please consider making a contribution to keep this wonderful organization growing. www.OpenHeartMagic.org

Hudson
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (May 4, 2016 10:03PM)
I have been quite busy these last 2 years working on this Magic Nurse concept. Here is a link to a news story: http://www.dallasnews.com/lifestyles/headlines/20141226-dallas-life-hes-a-nurse-who-is-also-a-clown.ece
Message: Posted by: NurseRob (May 14, 2017 08:15AM)
Have I mentioned lately that being a "Magic Nurse" has been a lifetime game changer for me? I wrote a book about it, and I will share the details on that experience soon. If we are not already FB friends look up MagicNurse Rob. Happy Mothers Day Everyone!
Message: Posted by: Rook (May 22, 2017 03:43PM)
I'm not a physician, but a clinical psychologist. As part of my outreach, I incorporate magic as part of my talks. Heck, I even did a magic trick as part of my ABPP exam.
Message: Posted by: cskibinsky (Jun 6, 2018 05:48PM)
Can I ask, does anyone provide a program teaching doctors magic? To help connect them with patients?
Message: Posted by: Dr.Brown,dc (Jul 19, 2018 10:07AM)
[quote]On Jun 6, 2018, cskibinsky wrote:
Can I ask, does anyone provide a program teaching doctors magic? To help connect them with patients? [/quote]

You can try Project Magic. The program was started in 1981 by David Copperfield. It is the best program I have found for beginning magic. I use it in my clinic for children.