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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The March 2006 entrée: Tim Ellis & Sue-Anne Webster » » Aussie Expressions » » TOPIC IS LOCKED (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Michael J. Douglas
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Ok, so we've all heard famous expressions like "crikey," "fair dinkum," and "g'day."
What are some of your favorite expressions, and for us Aussie impaired, what do they mean?
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Tim Ellis
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C'mon you mugs, don't give us stick! We've stuck to straight English since we lobbed in, now you rock up and want to hear some strine.

You mob probably think all us Aussies are bludgers knocking back the turps - veging out in our trackie daks, sitting on a slab and throwing down tinnies and stubbies, ready to have a technicolor yawn.

Well that's definitely a porky in my case, I'm a real piker. Sue-Anne enjoys a glass of plonk now and then, Cab Sav or even cleanskin, but I wouldn't even touch a pot or a middy if it was a prezzy. Give me a bag of lollies, though a lolly bag is something completely different...

I'm flat out like a lizard drinking right now, but I don't want you looking like dills or drongos, so before I shoot through I'll give you the good oil. Don't spit the dummy though, I'm not having a lend of you, you've got to promise you'll give it a burl or you'll have Buckley's of understanding your cobbers.

So, you might be at an ace barbie, or spending the arvo watching a game of aerial ping pong, when some bloke bails you up and gives you an earbashing. No need to chuck a wobbly, she'll be right if you just look at the context of what he said.

Though, there are some pretty prickly ones.

* You can take a cut lunch with you, but whatever you do, don't cut your lunch in polite company.
* A cockie could be one of three things... maybe four.
* To go to bed with a hottie is not as exciting as you might think, it's just a hot water bottle.
* Knockers can be a good or bad thing.
* It's good to have a pack of mates here, but in a very different sense than it is in the USA.
* The only place that's good to eat a freckle is in a lolly shop.
* In the same vein, you can go on a date, or sit on your date.
* And an extremely important one for the ladies: as a certain female tourist from the USA learned, you don't arrive in Australia and promptly announce how sore your fanny is.

So study up carefully and I reckon you'll have no worries. You won't sound like a galah, a dipstick or a septic... you'll pass for a true blue, dinky di Aussie!

Hooroo!
Sue-Anne Webster
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Blimey, Tim.

Onya, mate!

Your chooks cooked, so don't be hangin too long or you'll be done like a dog's dinner. Luv from ya missus.
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Lookin' a bit wonkie there, Tim. If you're busier than a one-armed paper hanger you better get a wriggle on. As for NOT having a bevvie every now and again: you must be troppo. I like a cold Schoo-ie myself every now and again and even get in a wedgie in between shouts whenever I'm drier than a dead dingo's donger (or a pommie's bath towel, even). These blokes who don't have a quiet one, I reckon they wouldn't know the postman was up 'em until he blew the whistle.

Mind you, over here, a cold one is rare than rocking horse manure.

See you 'round like a rissole.
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Gees guys,

all this guff is enough to put a bloke off his Dog's eye and dead horse! Ah, no probs! But I'd love to see the rest of em Drongo's try and get a gander at what the hell we're all rabbiting on about.

Mind you, they're giving both Tim and Sue-Anne a fair suck of the sav, so I guess I can't whinge much - and we all know you'r blood's worth bottling.

Better stop bludging now, rack off and get back to the hard Yakka - I've got to make a quid, ya know.

She'll be right!

M@
Ian Richards
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Struth,

You blokes have come the raw prawn, time for the rough end of a pineapple.
Tim Ellis
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Onya Ian for trying, but I can still hear your accent! Smile
Michael J. Douglas
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Fair suck of the sav, Tim! You're a dinki-di bottling his blood's worth.
I may be a bit bodgy with the Aussie lingo, but I reckoned I'd give it a burl. I'm still nothin' like a ridgy-didge, but like London to a brick, she'll be apples if I don't give it away.

Now who opened their lunch?
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Tim Ellis
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Okay, a quick Strine quiz for all you wannabees out there, no help from the Aussies though:

Chemist =

Footsies =

Dingaling =

Cark =

RBT =

Brass Monkey Weather =

Lollipop Lady =

Kick to Kick =

Heart Starter =

Over the shoulder boulder holder =

Husband beater =

Chuck a Uee =

King Dick =



Good luck! Copulater!
Michael J. Douglas
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Ok, now you're just makin' up words there, Tim. Smile
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Sue-Anne Webster
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He's fair dinkum Michael - why not give it go!!

It's imaginative language - very visual... for example -

Whaddya reckon an "Over the shoulder boulder holder" might be. Imagine - boulders. What might hold something like boulders that is over the shoulder? (hint: of a woman)
IT Magic
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Hey anyone know the origin of the brass monkey comment. A lovely naval story it is.
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Sue-Anne Webster
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Tell it!

It may help the "foreigners" figure out what "brass monkey" is.
Vandy Grift
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Well, I'm sure that over the shoulder boulder holder is a a bra. Heard that one years ago.

I think a chemist is what we would call a drug store or pharamcy over here.

Really no clue on the rest. Over here a "wife beater" is a name for a tank top undershirt. NO clue what a "husband beater" is.

Is a dingaling a telephone? Are footsies little socks?

If Brass Monkey Weather means very cold weather than I think I get that one as well.

Vandy
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Ian Richards
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Quote:
On 2006-03-08 17:52, Tim Ellis wrote:
Onya Ian for trying, but I can still hear your accent! Smile


Good on ya Tim, whenever I go home to Melbourne people think I talk like a Yank! After having been away for eighteen years I was beginning to wonder ... Now I'm a bloke without a country because people in the U.S. still think I talk like an Aussie!
Michael J. Douglas
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Chemist = someone who makes, or serves, liquid amber

Footsies = Aussie football players (rugby)

Dingaling = telemarketer Smile

Cark = a worry or care

RBT = police

Brass Monkey Weather = really cold weather

Lollipop Lady = in Britain it's a crossing guard, but I'll say it's someone who serves drinks

Kick to Kick = a game of footy

Heart Starter = a heart attack or a defibrillator (or operator of one)

Over the shoulder boulder holder = a bra

Husband beater = a rolling pin

Chuck a Uee = throw a u-turn

King Dick = captain of a rugby team?


Now I shall go play with my straightjacket!
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Vandy Grift
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You cheat!! I'll bet dollars to doughnuts that you googled those answers!! Are they all correct?

Vandy (shaking my fist at Michael)
"Get a life dude." -some guy in a magic forum
Williamanon
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Tim Ellis
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I'm not so sure he did cheat, he only got a few right:

Chemist =

Footsies =

Dingaling =

Cark =

RBT =

Brass Monkey Weather = really cold weather

Lollipop Lady = in Britain it's a crossing guard

Kick to Kick = a game of footy (more information please)

Heart Starter =

Over the shoulder boulder holder = a bra

Husband beater =

Chuck a Uee = throw a u-turn

King Dick =
Michael J. Douglas
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Vandy,
This is NOT the place to reveal methods! That's in the Secret Sessions. Smile

Some of them, I had heard before. I used to watch Rugby! Some of them, we use here (husband beater and chuck a uee). Quite a few are just guess work. I googled two - RBT and Lollipop Lady - and they're still pretty much guesses. I found that in Britain, a lollipop lady is a crossing guard. However, I've heard that lolliwater is beer in Australia. So, I took a guess.

The link Williamanon posted only has "Cark it" which it says means "to die." I seems I'm wrong on at least that one!
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Tim Ellis
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Well Michael J, "Cark" is actually "die", so you're making progress.

Husband beater and RBT were wrong though... see my post above and try to fill in the gaps!

This is not just a challenge for Michael J though, anyone can play!
Jonathan Kelly
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I have to have a go!!

Chemist = Well in Ireland a chemist is a pharmacist...maybe it's the same downunder

Footsies = As in play footsies? Under the table?

Dingaling = A stupid person. I've been called it!

Cark = die (from your post!!)

RBT = It's an acronymm but I haven't a clue.....really brilliant tinny???

Brass Monkey Weather = really cold weather

Lollipop Lady = in Britain it's a crossing guard

Kick to Kick = a game of footy (more information please)

Heart Starter = Whiskey?

Over the shoulder boulder holder = a bra

Husband beater = If it's what I'm thinking....I knew it as 'the punishment' when I was a kid. Rolling Pin?

Chuck a Uee = throw a u-turn

King Dick = Queen Fannie's husband?
"But where did the lighter fluid come from?"
Elly May Drudge
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Well Johnny I've heard a lot about the Irish but you certainly know your Aussie slang. I'm surprised that, being Irish, you don't know RBT (Random Breath Test).

The only others you missed were Husband Beater, which is a long bread stick, and King Dick... someone who thinks he's really sooooo good!

It can be used in a sentence like: "Tim's so clever he just thinks he's King Dick!"

But those words Tim put up are pretty basic Australian. I've put some much more interesting words on my DVD - like "Cackleberry"


Here's some to really test you:

Cheese and kisses

Her indoors

The old girl

Ball and chain
Jonathan Kelly
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Just because I'm Irish doesn't mean I like to drink........well ok....it does!!!

That reminds me of a story about a small pub in the Irish countryside. It was in the middle of nowhere so everynight the regular customers used to drive there, and obviously drive home "under the influence". Well the local police heard about this and set out to find the pub and perform a sting operation.

So after a few hours searching they found the pub. Sure enough there were about 15 cars parked outside. So they waited till closing, parked across the street, to catch their first drink driver. Being a country pub it didn't abide by the closing time laws and it was 2:00 before there was any sign of movement. Sure enough soon after the front door opened and out staggered a poor fella who looked a bit worse for wear. He was walking from side to side, speeding up, slowing down. They watched him closely and knew they had their man when he took out the car keys, walked to his car, dropped the keys, fell over picking them up, picked up a stone by mistake, felt a bit puzzled when it wouldn't open the door......

All the while more people were leaving the pub but they focused their attention on this one guy who had finally got the car keys back from the ground, opened the door, got in a started the engine. Immediately they put the sirens on and sped over to his car. All the other cars left the car park quickly but the policemen didn't mind, they had their unlucky scapegoat that would lose the pub it's licence.

One of the officers got out and cockily walked over to the drunk man's car. He tapped on the window. The man missed the window winder on the first attempt but managed to open up on the second.

"Sir, we have suspicion that you intend to drive under the influence of alcohol. If you'd be so kind as to blow into this breath tester........that's it, a little longer....*beep*...great, one moment while it calculates the result."

The officer waited and suddenly the green light popped up. He was amazed. He tried it again, and again it passed.

"I.....I don't understand....." he said as he was lost for words.

The man calmly answered. Tonight, officer, I'm the designated decoy.
"But where did the lighter fluid come from?"
Jonathan Kelly
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Quote:
On 2006-03-09 20:43, Elly May Drudge wrote:
Well Johnny I've heard a lot about the Irish but you certainly know your Aussie slang. I'm surprised that, being Irish, you don't know RBT (Random Breath Test).

The only others you missed were Husband Beater, which is a long bread stick, and King Dick... someone who thinks he's really sooooo good!

It can be used in a sentence like: "Tim's so clever he just thinks he's King Dick!"

But those words Tim put up are pretty basic Australian. I've put some much more interesting words on my DVD - like "Cackleberry"


Here's some to really test you:

Cheese and kisses

Her indoors

The old girl

Ball and chain


Do they not all mean the same thing? Wife?
"But where did the lighter fluid come from?"
Elly May Drudge
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Yep.

And she's called Sue-Anne!

LOVE THE STORY!! I like your Irish sense of humour. Remind me to have a Guinness with you when next we meet.

Bottom's up!
Jonathan Kelly
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How did you know my bottom was up???? I didn't know my webcam was on.

I don't even have a web cam....:?

Hey, it's St. Paddy's Day on the 17th, what better time to visit Ireland. You'll even get a nice shamrock in your Guinness. I'll be sure to give you a tour if you're ever over here. Maybe even Tim and Sue-Anne too!
"But where did the lighter fluid come from?"
Michael J. Douglas
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Chemist = a rugby referee

Footsies = a football

Dingaling = There's an old Chuck Berry song called "My Dingaling" about a type of child's rattle. You don't want to know what Wikipedia says.

RBT = RugBy Tournament

Kick to Kick = a game of footy (footy is Australian football, or rugby)

Heart Starter = the beginning of a game of footy

Husband beater = an alcoholic drink

King Dick = Dick Reynolds was a rover in football that was known as "King Dick."


You like rugby, don't you?
Michael J.
“Believe then, if you please, that I can do strange things.” --from Shakespeare’s ‘As You Like It’
Elly May Drudge
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I see all Johnny my boy...

Interesting name you have by the way ... hmmm

Anyway... forget the other two, I'd be there with bells on! And a shamrock in your Guinness? My, my... where do they fit the liquid? You Irish are a weird lot, aren't you?! No wonder America and Australia have some real doozies amongst them.

I've got a lovely Irish friend, you know. Lovely lady, really. Makes me laugh... just like you.

I'll have a guinness and think of you on the 17th Johnnyfingers, dear.

And Michael J - I really like to sit back in my comfy chair when I have a break from my neighbourhood watch activities, put up my feet, guinness in my hand and watch the rugby. My favourite is Rugby League - you know, the real rough one where the players were no helmets... and they do that wonderful 'coat hanger' move. Yes... although, since moving to Melbourne from Sydney, I've grown rather partial to Aussie Rules. Very skilfull game, that is. Yes...

Got another Irish joke, while I think of some harder Aussie slang?
Jonathan Kelly
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Ok Elly May. One more joke for you that's very apt for this time of year...

Seán was born and raised in Dublin, and still lives there. But his two brothers, Paddy and Séamus both emigrated to America and Australia respectively. Every evening Seán would go to the local pub and order 3 Guinnesses. He'd take them and sit by himself and drink one after the other till all 3 were gone. Then he'd get up and leave.

After a few months of this the barman got very curious. The next time Sean came in and ordered 3 Guinnesses the barman said to him "Sean, if you don't mind me asking....why do you come in and order 3 Guinnesses, sit by yourself and drink them?"

"Ah that's easy" sais Sean. "You see I've two brothers that have moved abroad, Before they moved we used to go to this pub every day and I'd buy a drink for meself, and one each for them and we'd have a drink together. I keep up the tradition in their honour. Since they're not around anymore I drink their's aswell."

So this continued until one day in March when Sean walked in and ordered only 2 Guinnesses. The barman became very worried...this went on for nearly 40 days. Finally he couldn't take it anymore and went up to Sean fearing the worst.

"Sean, I hope nothing has happened to one of your brothers." he asked.

Sean just looked puzzled and took a sip of Guinness. "They're fine...What makes you think that?"

"Well", said the barman "Everyday you used order 3 Guinnesses, one for you and one each for your brothers. But lately you've only ordered 2"

"Ah!" says Sean pausing to take a long gulp "Sure aren't I off the stuff for Lent".
"But where did the lighter fluid come from?"
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