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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Once upon a time... » » Greek Mythology (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

myoungbauer
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Hi everyone

I've always loved Greek mythology, and have recently become motivated into trying to incorporate a few favorites into my routines. I've been inspired by Christian Chelman's work(especially "Irma" from Hauntiques), Jim Henson's Storyteller series, and a childrens novel "the Lightning Thief"(Great fun)

Is anyone else out there using these stories? Any favorites? Any stories you just can't find a routine for? Least favorites? Anyone feel like brainstorming?

Matt
mrmystic
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In my dice act on the history of dice I talk about the godess Fortuna who determined the outcome of a roll of the dice making luckly throwers fortunate and winning a fortune.
Payne
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I have a routine for the Beads of Prussia trick built arouind the tale of Pandorra. It's in an old Lonking Ring. Don't remember the date or issue as I don't subscribe but it's got Jeff McBride on the cover.
I contend that we are both atheists.
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mark townsend
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Hi Gang,
Check out the Mythic Tarot book and deck (if you don't own it already of course). It's a beautiful psychologcial / quasi-Jungian approach to Tarot, that uses the Greek Myths and their gods/goddesses as archetypes for spiritual self knowledge etc. I have been amazed by the power of these cards... and I'm sure you can adapt them for magic (i.e. conjuring) effects.
Mark
Ps. Yes both Capricornian Tales and Hauntiques are truly wonder-full indeed!!!
So here's a huge thank you to the 'Curator' Christian Chelman (from a 'Curate' Christian Priest)
Ringo
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The godesses of fate lend themselves to rather charming presentations Smile
Big Daddy Cool
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How about Pygmalian and Electra? That is a story just begging for an innovative stage illusionist.
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zwong
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If I'm not wrong, Juan Tamaris has a routine involving Centaurs in his Lessons in Magic series. It might not follow the Greek mythology stories but it does involve mythological creatures. Check it out!
leapinglizards
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Mark,

Good suggestion! I have been reading with the mythic tarot for over 15 years, and it is one of the only decks I recommend and the only book (Aside from My own of course) that I think is worth anything when it comes to tarot.

Dean
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Silvertongue
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How about the story of Narcissus with a ruperts pearl as the tears of Echo and a narcissus flower, if you know the story it ends with him growing into the flower...
How about this ( sorry about its length )...

Narcissus, a youth who knelt daily beside a lake to contemplate in his own beauty. He was so fascinated of himself that, one morning, he fell into the lake and drowned. At the spot where he fell, a flower was born, which was called narcissus. But this is not how the story ends. When Narcissus died the goddesses of the forest appeared and found the lake, which had been fresh water, transformed into a lake of salty tears. "Why do you weep?" the goddesses asked. " I weep for Narcissus, " the lake replied. " AH, it is no surprise that you weep for Narcissus, " they said, "for though we always pursued him in the forest, you alone could contemplate his beauty close at hand." "But…. Was Narcissus beautiful?" the lake asked. "Who better than you to know that?" the goddesses said in wonder. " After all, it was by your banks that he knelt each day to contemplate himself!" The lake was silent for some time. Finally, it said: "I weep for Narcissus, but I never noticed that Narcissus was beautiful. I weep because, each time he knelt beside my banks, I could see, in the depth of his eyes, my own beauty reflected.
This is a rendition by Paolo Coelho... made me cry... all you need is a salty tear and your off... I have more idea's I will post soon for I too have thunk about this one...
For as long as space exists,

And living beings remain in cyclic existence,

For that long, may I too remain,

To dispel the sufferings of the world.



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Silvertongue
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I could see the story of Icarus being well adapted into a routine. I think just a simple lrg white feather, loops or elastic i.t. ala Losader and the paddle move. How about ending it with an ICARUS levitation.
There are lots of renditions of this story and a great one on the 'storyteller series' This story appeals to a lot of people too. Cirque du soliel did a beautiful rendition of it in the 'flight of icarus' in the Varekai show...
Not mentioned yet is the story of King Midas, there is lots of potential for this routine in todays age. There are already props and routines on the market for this idea and there are a few ideas here in the forum too.
For as long as space exists,

And living beings remain in cyclic existence,

For that long, may I too remain,

To dispel the sufferings of the world.



-Shantideva

Engaging in the Conduct of a Bodhisattva
Magicmike1949
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I'm working on a gypsy thread routine and the goddesses of Fate. Read up on them and you'll see the connection.
SpellbinderEntertainment
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Magic in the Ancient Greek World
By Derek Collins
ISBN: 978-1-4051-3239-8
Paperback - 224 pages
Other Available Formats: Hardcover
March 2008, Wiley-Blackwell
List US $27.95

Original and comprehensive, Magic in the Ancient Greek World takes the reader inside both the social imagination and the ritual reality that made magic possible in ancient Greece.

Explores the widespread use of spells, drugs, curse tablets, and figurines, and the practitioners of magic in the ancient world

Uncovers how magic worked. Was it down to mere superstition? Did the subject need to believe in order for it to have an effect?

Focuses on detailed case studies of individual types of magic
Examines the central role of magic in Greek life
“Tales of Enchantment: The Art of Magic”
by Walt Anthony
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Bill Palmer
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Quote:
On 2007-06-03 11:44, Silvertongue wrote:
I could see the story of Icarus being well adapted into a routine. I think just a simple lrg white feather, loops or elastic i.t. ala Losader and the paddle move. How about ending it with an ICARUS levitation.
There are lots of renditions of this story and a great one on the 'storyteller series' This story appeals to a lot of people too. Cirque du soliel did a beautiful rendition of it in the 'flight of icarus' in the Varekai show...
Not mentioned yet is the story of King Midas, there is lots of potential for this routine in todays age. There are already props and routines on the market for this idea and there are a few ideas here in the forum too.


See "Swan Lake" in Final Curtain.

See "The Philosophers Stone" in Sheherazade.
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Magnalucius
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The very powerful story of the Minotaurus and the Labyrinth. You can use the images of celtic and christian medieval cathedrals, wich have labyrinth patterns, or take some inspiration on Robert Neale´s books.
Lux In Tenebris
Magnalucius
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And, by the way, the Ariadna´s thread myth as a pattern for the Gypsy thread? Look Eugene Burger´s performance for more inspiration. Or a cups and balls storitelling routine, with Perseus looking for the Minotaurus and lost in the Labyrinth?
Lux In Tenebris
Rosemary
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...or Borodin...
The Curator
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I use myths in almost all my stories, traditional mythologies and local tales.
From Medusa to the 1001 Nights or the Flying Dutchman (some have been published here).
The latest (the Drabardi) is about a Russian folk tale, Vassilisa the Beautiful and Baba Yaga. The tale also reinterprets the idea of the origin of the tarot. It started with the discussion about vampire ESP, but at the end I came up with a very interesting theory, totally usable in performances...
I'm also currently working on the myth of Kadmos, the foundation of Theba and the teeth of Drakon.
Lynne Kelly
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Spiders often feature in my routines, so the story of Arachne and her weaving competition with Athena, leading to Arachne being turned into an spider is one I am working on using a few of Card-shark's Medieval Tarot cards. I use one of the blank cards with added spider for the final reveal.
Stefan
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Some ideas others have used, discusseed on the Shadowdigest a number of years back - Stefan

Gypsy thread - tie in the story of the 3 fates and the thread of life

Pandora's box and finding hope

The Bed of Procrustes - a story of Theseus
Big Daddy Cool
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Back to Pygmalian & Electra... I was hoping someone else would pick this up and run with it - Pygmalian was a scupltor who sculpted a statue of a woman. The statue was so beautiful that Pygmalian fell in love with her. Aphrodite (I think) was so moved by his love that she gave life to the statue. The creator falls in love with his creation.

There was a play about this called Pygmalina, which later inspired the musical My Fair Lady.

There are so many directions one could take this concept...
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The Curator
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Quote:
On 2008-11-21 09:49, Big Daddy Cool wrote:
Back to Pygmalian & Electra... I was hoping someone else would pick this up and run with it - Pygmalian was a scupltor who sculpted a statue of a woman. The statue was so beautiful that Pygmalian fell in love with her. Aphrodite (I think) was so moved by his love that she gave life to the statue. The creator falls in love with his creation.
There are so many directions one could take this concept...


Wasn't that also the theme of Tim Powers'The stress of her regard ?
Big Daddy Cool
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I'm not familiar with that work...
Although the theme is one of my favorites... It actually give me an idea for the new Roxy show I'm writing...
Swing Hard, Swing Often!
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