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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Tricky business » » Trade Show Magic Question (5 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Mindpro
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On Jun 2, 2017, thomasR wrote:
The artists that I have worked for do not let booking agents confirm a date without getting their approval. The booking agents seek and collect the offer, they forward the offer to management, who then forward it to the artist for final approval.

*the above is in no way meant as an argument... Just saying what I have witnessed in my little corner of the industry*



Of course this is true, however I was just answering your question from above about are there markets or situations tat I know of where this is possible or happens?

I agree it is something each of us must decide, but it is also as Danny points out what the client or industry is used to. For example if the client has previously had performers, speakers or other talent and none of them ever requested pay for travel days, do you see how this makes you look different? Many of these bigger companies may have booked Jay Leno or Bill Maher, Ray Romano and or perhaps Seinfeld and none of them ever charged for travel days, so who is this unknown guy to charge for travel days?" It is a perception, often a very early on perception that I wouldn't want anywhere near me as I am trying to break into a market/industry and start a new relationship with what could be a on-going client for tens or hundreds of dollars or more over a lifetime. This possibly could be something you seek after being well established with a client and in a deal where you are doing all of their trade shows across the country, where they send you in a day in advance along with their advance team. In a scenario like this I could see this perhaps as a possibility, but again only for the top percent of pro workers in the market.

Simple is always better. I can not tell you how many of my long-term client relationships both as an entertainer as well as an agent/promoter have been based on the client saying "you make it so easy for us to work with you. Why can't others be this way." From an agency perspective I firmly believe it is because I am entertainer first and operate my business from BOTH the perspectives of the entertainer as well as those of the client all within industry standards. I can't begin to tell you what a difference it makes.

Often when reading so many posts here in Tricky Business pertaining to performer's business operations, as well as mentalities, beliefs and perceptions with regard to their performances, approaches and material, I can not tell you how many times I sincerely wish I could bring all of these performers into my office to spend a few days to hear and see the other side of the coin. How the prospects, inquiring customers and clients ask, inquire about and see things. What their interests and needs truly are and how soooo many times one single element can be a deal killer. Regardless of the level of performers or markets (we handle both consumer and professional), regardless if they are an experienced talent booker/buyer or a complete newbie that openly admit "I have never done this before and really don't know where to start." Almost every single one of these has things that most performers should really hear as I truly feel it would make the world of difference in how they operate, view, approach and deal with inquiring prospects and how to properly present and close bookings. It is much more encompassing and telling than just being a self-booked artist,as clients rarely provide the same insight and depth as to an agency or talent specialist.

On the rare occasion where I may have had an act or artist in my office when I had to take a call, they would be witness to this and would often say after the call "man, I had no idea about this." It is true, most performers don't. They tend to only see things and operate from their own perspective or worst yet beliefs.
Mindpro
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On Jun 2, 2017, Dannydoyle wrote:
Absolutely. Every situation is different. That is sort of the point I guess we are making.


Yes, especially with travel and lodging.
makulit974
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Hi everyone, I write on this thread because it seems to be followed by pros with wealth of knowledge. I am hoping you can help me.
I have been doing magic for 32 years and did my first paid gig 20 years ago when I was 18. I kept magic as a hobby, doing some gigs here and there whilst studying.

After my bachelor and MBA, I successfully worked for 12 years around the globe as a hotel manager specialising in hotel openings. A couple of years ago, I returned home to France. I had just lived through a devastating typhoon in The Philippines, losing my house in the process.
That's when I decided to turn full time pro whilst securing a salary doing consulting for hotels and restaurant. I have now come to a point where I don't do any consulting, only magic (close-up and parlour) and that's enough to secure a decent earning for my wife and 2 young children.

Sorry for the life story but I thought it was worth explaining my background. I recently decided to go into the Trade Show market. I have started reading about it. I got some french general trade show books and marketing books to understand the market and its verbiage (i studied and worked mostly in english).
I also watched some trade show magic videos (Eddie Tullock, Marc Paul). I am planning on getting Seth's book now. I will study as much as I can until I am confident I really understand the market so I can eventually sell my service. Trade show magic exists in France but I think it is very new compared to US and UK.
I could not find any specialised book or video on the subject.

Now, I understand that my question is premature since I still have so much to learn. But I wonder, how would you suggest I pitch the service to exhibiting companies if I have no experience?
I believe I understand the magic part. I have routines in my repertoire that I could apply to product presentation, company recognition... I am not really worried about the scripting either. I am also very comfortable in a business environment.
It's more about how to get started. What steps should I take and when should I take the plunge.
I guess I'll know when I am ready. But I would love some guidance. Maybe some more resources I may have overlooked.

If you have read until this point, I thank you so much.

Patrick
Dannydoyle
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There are 2 (At least.) ways to approach the trade show market.

You can do product integration or sell them on the idea that the higher number of people who go through the both the higher the sales. If the sales guys get a 10% conversion rate and 100 people go through then it is 10 people. If 300 go through it is 30. Now the numbers may not match up exactly in a geometrical progression, but it will result in more sales.

That is my preferred way to do it because SO many of the product integration attempts are so cheesy and so forced and so bad that I stay away from the idea entirely. (Everyone here is the exception to that rule.)

I have seen many companies that were burned badly by these presentations and won't use magicians who try to integrate products.

On the contrary some are quite good at it and companies won't use you if you can't do that.

For me it is a matter of preference. Either way is correct.

And simply do not tell them you have no experience. Eventually you will. Just don't approach bigger companies you want to work for later until you have experience. You don't want to make a shaky first impression.
Danny Doyle
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<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
Mindpro
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Thanks for the detailed background information upfront. That's the way to be introduced to a forum and to start posting.

The first thing you must realize is it is not about the magic. It is also not about being a magician or performer. While there are some quite successful trade show magicians, most will likely tell you the same. The magic is your presentational method to achieve a greater purpose. Trade show managers also don't book trade show talent because of the magic but rather what it is a means to.

You are an attraction to their booth. Secondly, you are best served to position yourself as part of a results-driven benefit and process that aides and assists them in attaining and achieving their goals and expectations for being at the trade show.

Remember, trade shows are part of an industry and associations. They are not like your local business expo. They are there to gain clients, continue to serve existing clients, introduce their products and services to the industry and most of all to position themselves within their industries. Once understood, you must get to know what they are trying to achieve. There are many different reasons and strategies to participate in these ranging from introducing new products/services to product demos and sampling to education, to actual conversions and sales. You need to fulfill a purpose in these efforts.

Where I see so many new magicians completely blow it is they try to sell the client on magic and entertainment. You are not intended to be the "star" of a booth, you are to never overshadow the client and their products, services, and purposes. You are there to support and enhance their already established efforts. In order to do this, you need to find what this is. When I coach and train trade show talent we begin with what I call the discovery process, which is multi-faceted. You need to do your due diligence on both the trade show market as well as the prospective clients you are approaching.

I agree with Danny in starting at a level you can handle and manage. You need to offer them a means to the desired results and outcomes they are seeking. Some of the tools in Seth's book can assist you in the information seeking process.

Also, remember the trade show market includes much more than what most talent thinks of when they think trade shows. They typically immediately think the trade show floor and exhibit booths. But there is much more to trade shows than just the expo floor, especially for magicians. I agree, educate yourself to the market as much as possible. First and foremost understand trade shows are a professional market, not a consumer market, so many things are controlled by this understanding and all it entails - everything from contacts, preferences, marketing, and resources, to operational procedures, mentalities, expectations and how and where they seek talent such as yours. In order to serve the market and industry, you must understand the market and operational mentalities.

Also be aware how many companies see and perceive magicians, as well as the trade show market. They are not always as welcome and inviting as magicians would like you to believe. Many trade shows have rules and policies specifically against magicians.

You are at an exciting place and time. Dig in! Best of luck!
makulit974
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Wow it's very nice to wake to both your messages Danny and Mindpro.
I really appreciate it and everything makes perfect sense.
I admit at first, before watching Marc Paul's lecture, I thought about focusing on the magic. I since switched that mindset.
2018 is looking promising. I wI'll let you know how I get on with this adventure. I'll take my time and start small.
I definitely don't want a shaky start.

Do you guys know of any course that would fast track my learning? I'd be happy to travel internationally for this Smile

Thank you again guys, you really made my day.

Patrick
Bill Hegbli
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Quote:
On Nov 24, 2017, makulit974 wrote:

Do you guys know of any course that would fast track my learning? I'd be happy to travel internationally for this Smile

Patrick


There are only 7 books, and 1 DVD, that have been published on the subject by Trade Show magicians.

Bill Derman, book, Eddie Tullock (DVD) (book is out of print), and Dick Ryan with 5 books, not sold as one volume.
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theothermentalist
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Quote:
On Nov 27, 2017, Bill Hegbli wrote:
Quote:
On Nov 24, 2017, makulit974 wrote:

Do you guys know of any course that would fast track my learning? I'd be happy to travel internationally for this Smile

Patrick


There are only 7 books, and 1 DVD, that have been published on the subject by Trade Show magicians.

Bill Derman, book, Eddie Tullock (DVD) (book is out of print), and Dick Ryan with 5 books, not sold as one volume.



**gasp** and Seth Kramer's book of course!
Christian & Katalina
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There is an entire video course on making your living doing tradeshow magic by Harrison Carroll. Highly recommended.
Milbourne Christopher Award for Mentalism 2011
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Jerskin
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My tip would be go to a trade show and see a magician working. I was fortunate enough to see Karrell Fox & Mark Sweet work (Mark later helped hook me up with the auto show market). I think a lot of magicians want to get into doing trade shows for the $ but don't realize what it actually entails.
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corpmagi
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My book is still available: www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
corpmagi
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You should also consider attending the Trade Show Secrets Workshop in Tulsa, OK on 4/15. Details in a separate thread in the Tricky Business section, or just PM me with any questions.
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
makulit974
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On Feb 3, 2018, Christian & Katalina wrote:
There is an entire video course on making your living doing tradeshow magic by Harrison Carroll. Highly recommended.


Hi
Yes you are right. Great course. Been studying it for the past couple of months. A lot of great information.
makulit974
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On Mar 15, 2018, corpmagi wrote:
You should also consider attending the Trade Show Secrets Workshop in Tulsa, OK on 4/15. Details in a separate thread in the Tricky Business section, or just PM me with any questions.


I would love to attend. If there is one planned in Europe, I’m in Smile

I will be getting your book too very soon.
makulit974
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Quote:
On Feb 3, 2018, Jerskin wrote:
My tip would be go to a trade show and see a magician working. I was fortunate enough to see Karrell Fox & Mark Sweet work (Mark later helped hook me up with the auto show market). I think a lot of magicians want to get into doing trade shows for the $ but don't realize what it actually entails.


Yes that’s a great advice and that would be great if only it was more popular in France.
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