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Bato William
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What other effects are related to Malone's 'Sam The Bellhop'?

By this I mean effects where the deck is constantly being shuffled and cut, and most of the deck, or the entire deck, is dealt out to tell a story between the cuts and shuffles?

Bato William
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Doug Arden
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Quote:
On 2010-06-28 20:32, Bato William wrote:
What other effects are related to Malone's 'Sam The Bellhop'?

By this I mean effects where the deck is constantly being shuffled and cut, and most of the deck, or the entire deck, is dealt out to tell a story between the cuts and shuffles?

Bato William

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kentfgunn
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From a thread, long, long ago:

Here's the updated list. Hope I didn't miss anything:


* Sam the Bellhop - Bill Malone - DVD: Sam the Bellhop
* Diamonds on the Islands - unknown - Doesn't use full deck
* Who Killed Lilly Longlegs - Simon Lovell - Book: Simon Says
* A Chip and a Chair - Scott Grossberg - Web: http://www.underground-collective.com/ef......ct_id=13
* Risen - Michael Paul - Web: http://www.michaelpaulmagic.com
* The Adventures of Diamond Jack (original version) - Namreh - Book: Encyclopedia of Card Tricks (Hugard)
* The Adventures of Diamond Jack - Eugene Burger - Book: Secrets of Magic
* The Adventures of Diamond Jack - Diamond Jim Tyler - Book: Precious Gems Lecture Book
* A Soldier's Prayer Book - unknown - Web: http://www.newtscards.com/history_biblestory.asp
* After Hours - David Regal - DVD: Power, Premise, Participation Vol. 4
* Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret - Dave Williamson - Book: Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret
* A Night at the Improv - Eric Mead - DVD: ETMCM Vol. 1 or Mag: Magical Arts Journal - Paul Harris Issue
* Hopping Henry - Tim Sutton - Web: http://web.mac.com/timsutton1/iWeb/timsutton/magic.html
* A Detective Story - Al D'Alfonso - Web: http://www.online-visions.com/effects/0512al.html
* Aristocrats Magic Trick - Eric Mead - Web: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztBZcfAIqXM
* An Englishman in New York - Wayne Dobson - Book: Dobson's Choice
* Joe Kerr's Love - Robert E. Neale - Book: Tricks of the Imagination
* The Journey of Joe Kerr - Robert E. Neale - Book: Tricks of the Imagination
* The Fleeting Queen - Murry A. Sumner - Mag: Linking Ring, Sept. 1988
* Love Conquers All - Jack Vosburg - Mag: Jinx no. 109
* Unknown - Elliot "The Hawk" - Vid: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=oyV7n4WstMY&feature=related


We're up to 21 "deck story tricks," (Cranial Fermentator found a bunch!) with three being Diamond Jack variations.

The thread is here:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......&start=0
bishthemagish
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Before Sam the bellhop was known in Chicago there was a trick called Mo and Sam that was in the book The Last word on cards by W. F. (Rufus) Steel. Frank Everheart who was a magician that was performing at a place called the Ivanhoe was the first magician known to do Sam The Bellhop in Chicago.

He was the one that wrote up the trick that was sold by Magic Inc.

There is more to the story but a lot of it is hearsay and what I remember reading when I got the trick from Magic Inc. What can I say it has been a few years. If I remember right Bill Malone took this trick and made a miracle out of it. There were a few other magicians doing it in Chicago as well at the time.

I hope this helps.

I hope this helps.
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Bill Hallahan
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Although on a different subject, there are some routines using narrative at Rechecking Sam The Bellhop history.

This might be the thread KentFGunn is referring to, I didn't check all the routines. (Thanks Kent!)
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pepka
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Quote:
On 2010-06-28 23:38, bishthemagish wrote:
Before Sam the bellhop was known in Chicago there was a trick called Mo and Sam that was in the book The Last word on cards by W. F. (Rufus) Steel. Frank Everheart who was a magician that was performing at a place called the Ivanhoe was the first magician known to do Sam The Bellhop in Chicago.

He was the one that wrote up the trick that was sold by Magic Inc.

There is more to the story but a lot of it is hearsay and what I remember reading when I got the trick from Magic Inc. What can I say it has been a few years. If I remember right Bill Malone took this trick and made a miracle out of it. There were a few other magicians doing it in Chicago as well at the time.

I hope this helps.

I hope this helps.

Interesting that you bring up this book Bish. I have an autographed copy, signed "To my very good friend, Walter Gibson sincerly Rufus Steele." Then a date, which I can't quite recall, but I believe it's '57
Lawrence O
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Bato William, here is the list I have in my notes (in chronological order). Even if Bill Malone is delivering a successful performance of Sam The Bellhop which helped revive the genre, it really existed before.

The debate on this effect is whether it should be presented as a story which unfolds even though the game is shuffled (the approach followed by Bill Malone) or whether the cards are shuffled and the magician seems to make up the story as the cards come out (the approach followed by, amongst others, Michael Ammar.) I dare supporting the second approach for, after a while in "Bill Malone's approach", spectators realize that all these shuffling are not mixing anything and, as such, constitute an exposure of all kinds of false shuffles and just a self serving demonstration of skill.

Kent, thanks for the reference on Elliot "The Hawk" that I was missing.

Gay, John: Fables de [John] Gay & Beautés de la Poésie Anglaise ©1857, Chevalier de Châtelain, Londres : this Chevalier de Châtelain, known for his humoristic tone, privately published a versified account of the Richard Middleton story & Fables, Tr. En Vers Fr. Par Le Chevalier De Chatelain ©2010 by Nabu Press. There is no evidence but a strong probability that the Richard Middleton story (of obvious translated origin) could be the work of John Gay, born 30 in June 1685 at Barnstaple (Devon), who died 4 in December 1732. John Gay was an English poet and playwright and is best remembered for his 1728 “The Beggar's Opera”. In 1727 he had written for six year old Prince William, later the Duke of Cumberland, Fifty-one Fables in Verse which were translated in French by the Chevalier de Châtelain, the first writer of a versified account describing the Richard Middleton story.

Baldwin, Richard: London Magazine or Gentelman’s Monthly Intelligencer Vol XLV for the Year 1776, at the Rose in Pater Noster Row, p 544 “The Card Spiritualized” seems to be the first account of the story-deck genre and of Richard Middletown’s one. It describes soldier Richard Middleton who whips out a pack of cards rather than a Bible while attending a church service. Brought forth before the Mayor after the complaint of his sergeant and the Clergyman, he is threatened with severe punishment should no apology or explanation be forthcoming. Richard drew out his pack of cards, and upon presenting one of the Aces to the Mayor, continued his address to the magistrate as follows: “When I see an Ace, it reminds me that there is only one God; and when I look upon a Two or a Three, it reminds me of the Father and Son; the later of the Father, Son, and Holy Ghost”... And so it continues with all the cards in a suit.

Wilkinson, Thomas: Newcastle newspaper 10 August 1776 in Durham University Library Archives & Special Collections (Item Add.MS. 1474 of that collection) consists of the memoranda book of Thomas Wilkinson, a former chief constable of Chester Ward, Co. Durham. It contains an “Account of Richard Middleton, a soldier, and why he had playing cards in church at Glasgow”.

Bras-de-Fer, Louis: Explication Morale du jeu de cartes ; Anecdote curieuse et intéressante ©1778 “sous le nom de Louis Bras-de-Fer engagé au service du roi”, Bruxelles, p 7 : Explication Morale Du Jeu De Carte replaces the name of Richard Middletwon by the one of Louis Bras-de-Fer for a brief version of the story using all four colors from each ace to each King before commenting on the structure of the deck (2 colors, 4 suits, 12 court cards, 40 non court cards, 52 cards, 364 pips total, the white background, the shape of the cards …) & Anecdote curieuse et intéressante ©1809, Paris : Explication Morale Du Jeu De Carte

Hadin: Histoire du jeu de cartes du grenadier Richard ou explication du jeu de cinquante-deux cartes en forme de Livre de Prière, suivi de l’analyse de l’histoire sacrée et profane des Sciences et Arts, de la Mythologie, etc., etc., enrichi de Notes curieuses pour l’édification, l’instruction et l’amusement des personnes de l’un et de l’autre sexe ©1811 by Hadin employé au ministère des finances, Paris : Histoire du Jeu de Cartes du Brigadier Richard offers a very detailed version far exceeding the religious details found in other versions ; It is however using only one series from ace to King and then commenting on the structure of the deck (2 colors, 4 suits, 13 cards in each suit, 365 pips total …) to give the impression that it covered the full deck. Some fuzzy calculations are done like adding the four tens or the number of pips on the cards between Ace to five (inclusive) or adding the card values between the three and the six (inclusive) in order to find meaningful biblical correspondances. Chapter two (also in French) covers the same routine’s principle but without the introduction of Richard Midaleton and with all the references treated as mythological instead of Christian. Hence the Ace is Saturn (with explanations) Two is illustrated by Talus, Daedal’s nephew and Leda who as a swan laid two eggs: one with Helen and Clytemnestra and the other one with Castor and Pollex… very interesting and easier today than the extremely religious version which doesn’t concern everyone. Since everybody heard about mythologies but doesn’t remember all the details, it makes the routine very interesting and original for (richer) educated audiences

Anonymous: Cards Spiritualised or the soldier’s Almanack, Bible and Prayerbook: showing how one Richard Middleton was taken before the Mayor of the City he was in, for using a Pack of Cards in the Church during divine service; being a droll, merry, and humorous account of an odd affair that happened to a Private Soldier in the 60th regiment © [1786 circa] Newcastle

Anonymous: The Soldier’s Prayer-Book © [1790 circa] by J Ross printer, Newcastle: a rare printed sheet with the Richard Middletown’s story

Cumberland, Mr.: Satirical, Humorous and Familiar Pieces Prose 1795 by G. Nicholson and Co, Manchester, The Card Spiritualized by a Private Soldier

Le Normand, Marie-Anne-Adélaïde: Almanach du bonhomme Richard ©1809, Flying sheet about the story of Richard Midaleton (in that spelling) & Les Souvenirs prophétiques d’une sibylle sur les causes secrètes de son arrestation, ©1814 à Paris chez l’Auteur, rue de Tournon n°5, faub[our] S[aint] G[ermain] p 340 Histoire du jeu de cartes du grenadier Richard develops the story of Richard Midaleton (with that spelling). The version of this famous royalist fortune telling courtesan appeared after the French revolution and large parts relatively laicizing the text have been replacing other parts considered to be too religious.

Sporting Magazine or Monthly Calendar of the Transactions of The Turf The Chace and every other Diversions Interesting to the Plan of Pleasure, Enterprises and Spirit Vol The Seventh MDCCXCVI Printed for the proprietor and Sold by J. Wheble Warwick Lane near Saint Paul, p 90: Pack of Cards Spiritualized or the Consecration of the Devil’s Book,

Noël, François-Joseph-Michel & Chapsal : Leçons anglaises de littérature et de morale: sur le plan des Leçons Françaises et des Leçons latines, ©1817, Le Normant, Paris: even though the book is a French book it refers to English culture and is fully written in English p 55 The Cards Spiritualized by a Private Soldier tells of the story of the « One Richard Middleton, a private soldier…”

[Catnach Press Broadside]: The PERPETUAL ALMANACK; or, Gentleman Soldier's Prayer Book: Showing how one Richard Middleton was taken before the Mayor of the City he was in, for using Cards in Church during Divine Service ... (n. d. - Ca 1820s.) Catnach, Printer, 2, & 3, Monmouth-Court, 7 Dials., [London]: Single sheet, printed recto only. backing to sheet. A rare item illustrated with 2 woodcuts under the mast-head title, each 2-1/4" x 3-1/8". Illustrative border of playing cards [45 cards total, plus an emblem in each of the lower corners]. This is the version of the Seven Dial paper reported with a wrong date (at the time of this writing) by the magazine Genii as the first account of a story-deck

Mathie & Lockore: The Kilmarnock Mirror, and Literary Gleaner, consisting of Essays, Moral Tales, Poetry and a Variety of Miscellaneous Pieces, Adapted for Instruction and Amusement Vol 1 1819 by the Kilmarnock Press p 269 The Cards Spiritualized offers Richard Middletown story again.

Chatto, Facts and Speculations on the Origin and History of Playing Cards ©[1848] Chatto quotes the entire text of the “The Perpetual Almanack; or, Gentleman-Soldier's Prayer Book” stating that the pack of cards has served as “moral monitor, and help to devotion. Chatto underlines that the Perpetual Almanack is the most popular, and best known, of such devotions, or rather applications, erroneously noting its first publication believed to be Brussels, 1778 (the Louis Bras de Fer text wasn’t the first publication), with many subsequent editions, usually in chapbook format. Chatto goes on to state that his source as this very Catnach broadside. John Gay was an English Poet (1688-1732) whose Fables were published in 1726, first translated in French by Mme de Keralio in 1759, and then in versified form by Joly de Salins in 1811

Châtelain, Chevalier de: Fables de [John] Gay & Beautés de la Poésie Anglaise ©1857, Chevalier de Châtelain, Londres : this Chevalier de Châtelain, known for his humoristic tone, privately published a versified account of the Richard Middleton story & Fables, Tr. En Vers Fr. Par Le Chevalier De Chatelain ©2010 by Nabu Press. There is no evidence but a strong probability that the Richard Middleton story (of obvious translated origin) could be the work of John Gay, born 30 in June 1685 at Barnstaple (Devon), who died 4 in December 1732. John Gay was an English poet and playwright and is best remembered for “The Beggar's Opera” (1728). In 1727 he wrote for six year old Prince William, later the Duke of Cumberland, Fifty-one Fables in Verse which were translated in French by the Chevalier de Châtelain, the first writer of a versified account describing the Richard Middleton story.

Taylor, Rev Ed. S.: The History of Playing Cards with Anecdotes of their use in Conjuring, Fortune-telling and Card-sharping ©1865 by Rev. Ed. S. Taylor, B.A., published by John Camden Hotten, London, gives the history of this “Cards Spiritualized; or, the Soldier's Almanac, Bible and Prayer Book” often in short as “Soldier’s Bible”


Bolte, J.: Eine geistliche Auslegund des Kartenspiels ©1901 Keitschrift des Vereins Volkskunde, pp 376-406 : a complete survey of the different versions, in French, English, Spanish, German, Swedish, etc. of the classic Richard Middleton motif.

Shain, Steve: Prophetical ,Educational and Playing Cards ©1912 by Mrs. John King Rensselaer, George W. Jacobs and Co. It supplies a variant of the Richard Middleton Story with a Jewish faith slant to it.

Namreh [Herman L. Weber]: The Adventures of Diamond Jack marketed item: ©1926 ad in The Sphinx of April 1926 & Tops, Vol. 20, No. 11, ©Oct/Nov 1955 by Percy Abbott, Tops, p. 7 Diamond Jack

Lane, Frank [Morand Francis Caldwell]: Why Dan McGrew Was Shot ©1930 circa refers to Robert W. Service's poem The Shooting of Dan McGrew published in Songs of a Sourdough, 1907, Briggs, Toronto and brought to film by Herbert Blache in 1915 in The Shooting of Dan McGrew and a remake in 1924 under the same title by Clarence Badger starring legendary Barbara Lamarr who portrayed the shady prostitute with a heart of gold, "the lady known as Lou," with a noted grace and realism. The tale takes place in a Yukon saloon during the Yukon Gold Rush of the late 1890s. It tells of three characters: Dan McGrew, a rough-neck prospector; McGrew's sweetheart "Lou", a formidable pioneer woman; and a mysterious, weather-worn stranger who wanders into the saloon where the former are among a crowd of drinkers. The stranger buys drinks for the crowd, and then proceeds to the piano, where he plays a song that is alternately robust and then plaintively sad. He appears to have had a past with both McGrew and Lou, and has come to settle a grudge. Gunshots break out, McGrew and the stranger kill each other, and the Lady that's known as Lou ends up with the stranger's poke of gold.

Grant, Ulysses Frederik: 25 Tricks and Ideas Part One ©1931 by U. F. Grant p 11 Effect 25 offers a shorter version of Frank Lane’s The Shooting of Dan McGrew. Ulysses use only a partial deck and Jumbo cards but involves funny bits and pieces like a bread roll, two small full shot glasses produced from the jacket (novelty store glasses which are double with the liquid between the partitions so it cannot spill out), a Joker painted negative, a Joker painted like a sunrise (with the lower half blank), and the card box & U. F. Grant, An American Original (3 DVD Set) The Shooting of Dan McGrew

U.S. Playing Card Co: Official Rules of Card Games 1930s, American version of Richard Middleton story. It closely follows the Newcastle version, with the following exceptions: The soldier is named "Richard Pike", "The five reminds me of the five wounds of our Lord...", "The Jack of Clubs represents the traitor Judas, also the knave who reported me to you", "The other three jacks represent the executioners of Christ", "The queens remind me of the women who anointed Christ; and the Queen of Hearts of His Mother. When I see the King, I think of God Almighty, King of Heaven; also of the three wise men from the East"

Benham, William Gurney: Playing Cards, History of the Pack and Explanation of its many Secrets, ©1931 Ward Lock, London; 1957 Spring Books, London, The Soldier Almanak

Morley, Henry Thomas: Old and Curious Playing Cards, Their History and Types from Many Countries and Periods ©1931 B.T. Batsford London, p 217: The Soldier Almanak

Leedy, Charles A.: Linking Ring, Vol. 4, No. 6 ©1936 by Charles A. Leedy, p 109 A Play on Hearts

Hugard, Jean: Encyclopedia of Card Tricks ©1937 by Glenn G. Gravatt and Jean Hugard, Max Holden NY, p 242 The Adventures of Diamond Jack; p 374 The Perpetual Almanac or The Soldier's Prayer Book & Encyclopedia of Card Tricks ©1961 by Glenn G. Gravatt and Jean Hugard, Faber & Faber edition p 270: The Adventures of Diamond Jack ©1992 Spanish translation by Monica Tamariz

Nellar, Robert: Genii Vol 1 N°8 ©April 1937, p 6 A Story and A Deck of Cards

Applegit, Elmer: More Card Manipulations N°2 ©1939 by Jean Hugard, p 24 Silas and the Slickers, a fourteen verse ballad

Edward M. Wilson Folklore, Vol. 50, No. 3 ©Sept 1939 by Taylor & Francis, Ltd. on behalf of Folklore Enterprises, Ltd. pp. 263-272 The Tale Of The Religious Card Player.

Harris, Monte: Tops Vol. 5, No. 4, ©1940 by Monte Harris p 32, Jack Hart in the Army

Vosburgh, Jack: The Jinx, N° 109 ©September 7th 1940, p 650 Love Conquers All

Labermier: The Linking Ring, Vol. 20, N° 9 ©November 1940, p 672

MacKenzie, Geo M.: The Story of Each Playing Card ©1945 by Mac's Mysteries in Glasgow, Scotland, the routine adds nothing new to the classic almanac or prayer book stories, it does however have fascinating information on each of the cards in the pack

Wallace, Roy: Linking Ring Vol. 28, N° 10 ©1948 by Roy Wallace, p 72 Sermon with a Deck of Cards

Tyler, T. Texas: Deck of Cards ©1948 by T. Texas Tyler took the song "Deck Of Cards" to #2 using the classic Richard Middletown story going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck. Texas Tyler however placed Monte Cassino in North Africa when it was a fierce battle in… Italy. Texas Tyler’s song however became a success and launched his version of the “deck of cards”. Texas Tyler’s manuscript of the lyrics, owned by Dominic Winter Book of Maxwell Street, Swindon, UK, were sold at auction by Wiltshire auction house on Wednesday, December 11th 2002.

Beckham, Richard & Ritter, Tex F.: Deck of Cards ©1948 by T. Texas Tyler; Richard Beckham who did the writing took Texas Tyler’s song to #10. It’s a versified gospel country using the classic Richard Middletown story going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck. This time the mistake on the Monte Cassino location is enriched with a mistyping making it “Casino”. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfOXLd5yFo8&feature=related and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lx9I1mnPsqo&feature=related

Harris, Phil: Deck of Cards ©1948 by T. Texas Tyler; The mistake on the Monte Cassino location enriched with the “Casino” misspelling enables to state that Phil Harris based his version on the Richard Beckham and Tex F. Ritter variant. It’s a versified gospel country using the classic Richard Middletown story going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck and referencing it to a year’s components.

Williams Sr., Hank: The Deck of Cards gospel country song © 1948 circa by Richard F. Beckham and Tex Ritter a rare wartime variant of Richard Middletown’s story, transposed in the 1944 Italian campaign at the terrible battle of Monte Cassino. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gib-V-FQAT0&feature=related

Navarino, Nick: Scarne on Card Tricks ©1950 by John Scarne, Crown Publishers, Jack Goes To Town

Anonymous: The Last Words on Cards, ©1952 by William F. “Rufus” Steele, p 53: Moe and Sam is actually the story of Sam the Bellhop: SAM is the manager of an hotel and sends Moe, his Bellhop to find a few customers for the last four available rooms in his hotel… with the 678 club and the two dollar tip running gags.

Scheiber, Alexander: A Hungarian Encyclopedia of Cards ©1952, On the Parodies of Catechism Song. Midwest Folklore II: 93-100.

McEnery, Dave: The Red Deck Of Card ©1953 gospel country song by Red River Dave McEnery adapting the Richard Middleton story, this time to Korea. It’s going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck

King, Pee Wee [aka Julius Frank Anthony]: The Red Deck Of Card ©1953 gospel country song by Pee Wee King adapting the Richard Middleton story, this time to the Korean war. The routine is going up the deck card by card from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the decks. Source: add in “The Billboard January 2 1954”

Anonymous: Monty The Spiv marketed item ©1954 circa by Harry Stanley's Unique Magic Studios

Martindale, Wink: A deck of cards ©1959 gospel country song by T. Texas Tyler allocating the Richard Middleton story to an anonymous American soldier. The lyrics is going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about numbers of cards in a deck. Martindale’s attempt to surf on Texas Tyler’s song was a success and his take was an even bigger hit than the original song. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPjeHr5WK0g&feature=related & © 2009

Curless, Dick [Richard William Curless]: Deck Of Cards ©1959 by Tiffany Records. The gospel country song, A deck of cards is again allocating the Richard Middleton story to an anonymous American soldier.

Cowboy Copas [Lloyd Estel Copas]: Alabam Gospel Country ©1960 by Lloyd Estel Copas, Starday. His first single for the label, "Alabam," became the biggest success of his already respectable career. It is a short versified “country” song reviving the classic Richard Middletown story now transposed in a Cowboy scene. It goes up only one suit of cards before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIQ9gczME5c&feature=related

Everhardt, Frank: Saga of Sam The Bellhop marketed effect, ©1961: The first advertisement appeared in Genii, Vol. 25, N° 11 of July 1961. Frank Everhardt had launched his version at the Black Knight Ivanhoe Bar in Chicago

Gallmon Cooke, Edna: Stop Gambler ©1961 takes the meaning of the cards in the Gospel songs. It can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJDbwfbT_Qo

Cray, Ed: Midwest Folklore, Vol. 11, No. 4 ©1962 (Winter, 1961-1962) by Ed Cray, Indiana University Press p 225-234: "The Soldier's Deck of Cards" Again

Runge, Herb: New Tops Vol. 4, No. 12, ©December 1964 by Herb Runge, p 48 A Fish Story

Lowe, Fred: The Gen ©1964 by Fred Lowe: The Wide Boy & New Pentagram Year 4, Issue 10 © December 1972 by Fred Lowe: The Wide Boy & Intermagic © March 1978 by Braunmüller, “Der Filou” is the German translation of “The Wide Boy”

Martello, Leo Louis: It's in the Cards ©1964 by Key Publishing Co NY, p 11 Legends Behind the Cards is Richard Middleton story (with the spelling shifted from Middletown into Middleton)

Fisher, John: John Fisher's Magic Book, ©1968 p 68 Treasure Trail is a tale of adventurers hunting for diamonds. It doesn't however use the entire deck (just 32 cards) but is well adapted to a children performance.

Bygraves, Max: Deck of Cards song ©1973 gospel country song by T. Texas Tyler’s 1948 song referring anonymously to the Richard Middletown story with the Beckham spelling mistake and Texas Tyler location mistake. It’s going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck.

Low, Bruce: Das Kartenspiel [The Deck of Cards] ©1974 is a German version of “Deck Of Cards”

Beal, George: Playing-Cards and Their Story ©1975 by Arco Publishing New York, refers to Morley’s account of The Soldier Almanak

Read, Bob: as from 1976 this most gifted British comedy magician made a trademark of his to perform Frank Everhardt’s story telling feat, Sam The Bellhop, using different newspaper hats while reciting the patter and displaying the cards.

Kaplan, Stuart R.: Encyclopedia of Tarot Vol. 1, ©1978 p 25 Soldier's Almanack, Bible, and Prayerbook reproduces the scarce text of the first story telling using a full deck

Ganson, Lewis: The Ganson Book, ©1983 by Lewis Ganson, p 108 Clever Dick

Malone, Bill: Lecture Notes ©1987 by Bill Malone: Sam the Bellhop & The Linking Ring, Vol. 68, N° 8 ©August 1988 p 84 Sam the Bellhop & Stevens Magic Emporium Greater Magic Video Library : The Art of Restaurant Magic, Vol. 44, ©1993 Sam The Bellhop (performance only) & On The Loose Vol 1 DVD Sam The Bellhop

Mead, Eric: MAJ Magical Arts Journal Paul Harris [triple] Issue ©1988 by Michael Ammar, Night At The Improv with Michael Ammar’s very subtle presentation suggesting that he is making up the story as the cards come out & Easy to Master Card Miracles, Vol. 1 ©1994 presents Eric Mead’s Night At The Improv & World Greatest Magic for the World Greatest Magicians: Storytelling Deck a nice compilation of some very great performance including Eric Mead’s Night At The Improv presented by Michael Ammar

Sumner, Murry A.: Linking Ring ©Sept. 1988 by Murry A. Sumner, The Fleeting Queen

Mead, Eric: Magical Arts Journal, Vol. 2, N° 9-10-11-12 ©1989 by Eric Mead, p 58 Night At The Improv is crediting The Adventures of Diamond Jack by Namreh as his source of inspiration. The story appears to be made up as the cards come out & Aristocrats DVD The Aristocrats is an adult patter short very entertaining version with a punch finish using the card box.

Stewart, Redd [Henry Ellis Stewart]: is reported as singing a version called “Red Deck Of Card” with Pee Wee King (for whom he had composed Pee Wee's biggest 1948 hit "Tennessee Waltz") published in 1989 in "16 country hits from the 1940's", and in 2003 in "The Essential Patriotic Collection". I could not find a recording date.

Neale, Robert E.: Tricks of the Imagination ©1991 by Robert Neale and Eugene Burger, Joe Kerr's Love; The Journey of Joe Kerr

Anderson, Bill: Deck of Cards song ©1991 gospel country song, revised and simplified by Bill Anderson which is a versified variant of T. Texas Tyler’s 1948 song referring anonymously to the Richard Middletown story going up the cards one by one from ace to king before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CW_41oGmdrM&feature=related

Socrate, Philipe: Notes de conférence ©1993 by Philipe Socrate, a story in French: Un Anniversaire Pas Comme Les Autres

Brooks, Robert L.: Apocalypse Vol 16 N° 2 © Feb 1993 by Harry Lorayne, p 2180 Saga Of Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid found a nice way to involve the audience into the story by chanting together a sort of simple funny line

Voigt, V.: Acta Ethnographica Hungarica – An International Journal of Ethnography Volume 44, Numbers 1-2 © July 2000 by Akadémiai Kiadó p Playing-Cards Are My Calendar And Prayerbook

Hood, Douglas: Ken Brooke's Magic Place ©1994 by L&L, A Tanner for the Waiter uses any pack with two Joker & A Tanner for the Waiter - updated Marketed Effect © by Eddie Burke, Amusing story illustrated by dealing playing cards. Use any pack with two Jokers. As shown on television several times

Sovine, Red: Cryin’ in the Chapel©1994 by Red Sovine: “Vietnam Deck of Cards” song was ordered from Red Sovine as a tribute to Vietnam Vets. This time the story is featuring an American soldier with the scene happening in Saïgon during the Vietnam war. Can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJLXbmLPjbU&feature=related

Brahams, Anthony: Ken Brook's Magic Place ©1994 by Anthony Brahams, p 288: Wide Boy

Travis, Merle Robert: Guitar Rags & A Too Fast Past © 1994 Merle’s Honky Tonk song Deck Of Cards is a heir or T. Texas Tyler allocating Richard Middleton’s story to an anonymous American soldier in the Italian Monte Cassino battle in WWII reinforcing the confusion about a Casino in French North Africa were Allies troops had landed at the end of 1942 before starting the Italian campaign. Merle Travis was virtually without peer as a guitarist and songwriter. A unique stylist, he was respected and prominent enough to have an instrumental style ("Travis picking") named after him. Merle Travis however died Oct. 20, 1983, in Tahlequah, Okla. U.S. and no date could be found for the recording of his take on the "Deck of Cards"

Decker, Ronald & DePaulis, Thierry & Dummett, Michael: A Wicked Pack of Cards The Origins of the Occult Tarot ©1996. St. Martin Press, p 127: refers to Mlle Le Normand’s routine.

Doc Eason: Bar Magic Vol 2 DVD ©1996 Sam the Bellhop-with Doc's entertaining twists

Kam, Curtis: Professional Close-Up of Curtis Kam - Deceptions in Paradise ©1996 by Jerry Mentzer, Published by Magic Methods p 71 Hard Boiled Detective: Story effect using a stacked deck

Lovell, Simon: Simon Says! The Close-Up Magic of Simon Lovell ©1997 by Simon Lovell, L & L Publishing p 83 Who Killed Lilly Longlegs

Daniels, Paul: You Don't Have to be a Kid to Pull a Rabbit Out of a Hat; Magic for Adults ©1997 Paul Daniels and Barry Murray; Barricade Books Inc, p 132 The Perpetual Almanack or Gentleman's Prayer Book: a story to go with a stacked deck

Malone, Bill : Bill Malone Tips Sam The Bellhop VHS © 1998 by BM Enterprises ; Since it appeared in his 1987 Lecture Notes, Bill Malone has garnered a worldwide reputation with this routine. He has performed it in every possible venue including on television and formal close-up shows. By adding expert blind shuffles and cuts, he has made his now classic Sam the Bellhop story and stack into a reputation making signature routine. By now the routine seems as impossible as extremely impressive looking. Several magicians had attempted to learn the routine, but missed the essential ingredients. This DVD uncovers Malone's original dynamics that make the effect flow. If we apply ourself, we can learn a four-minute act that we can use to impress as we entertain

Rhett Bryson: The Devil's Prayerbook ©1999 by WeeMagicBook, A fascinating compendium of all of the numerical coincidences associated with a deck of playing cards. Also includes the variations on the "Soldier and the Prayerbook" story, in print and song, tidbits about the suits and the deck. Spelling the suits is presented (in FOUR languages!) along with two methods of "culling" the cards into the proper position right in front of the audience. The author has discovered an amazing new numerical coincidence which is so amazing that it is the perfect ending to a story about all of the numerical details about the deck that it is sure to cause the audience to have chills when they hear it! This version 9 contains contributions by Bob Neale, Max Maven and Algonquin McDuff, a gospel version of the "Middleton Story" and reprints of woodcuts from an early English chap-book

Tyler, Diamond Jim: Diamond Jim Tyler's Precious Gems lecture notes ©2000 (circa) by Diamond Jim Tyler his version of The New Adventures of Diamond Jack routine is another whimsical story using every card in the deck. The cards that the magician needs to tell his story seem to just magically appear at the his fingertips as he tells his story while mixing the cards & The New Adventures of Diamond Jack marketed effect is supplying the detailed instructions with a deck of Bicycle cards

Dixon, Doc: IBM convention note, Little Rock ©1999 by Doc Dixon, Dental Surgery

Persuasions, The: Sunday Morning Soul ©2000 this prototypical and legendary vocal harmony “A cappella” sing group, borrows from the Southern gospel tradition including “deck of cards” can be heard on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FmsQATA68k

Tamariz, Juan: Mnemonica ©2004 Juan Tamariz, Hermetic Press p 189 Two stories introduces the story deck concept using Tamariz’s stack; First story starts with: “I was born in the year of 42, I come from Ecija which is where the gang ‘The Seven Kids from Ecija’ came from. Three of them were dark hair and four were redheads…; p 190 Second Story begins with “Once upon a time there was a pair of twos (of course!), two three card monte men in the middle of a crowd of eight people, each with with a five dollar bill in his hand. One of the pair was known as the monte King…” Both stories use only 26 cards following a seemingly casual cut from an allegedly mixed deck.

Regal, David: Constant Fooling, Vol. 2. ©2002 by David Regal, p 227: After Hours is a detective story trick & Premise Power & Participation Vol 4 DVD After Hours & & World Greatest Magic by the World Greatest Magicians © 2009, L & L Publishing; a re-edition of the Stevens Magic Emporium release.

Giesecke, Ron: Apologies to Dickens © 2002 by Ron, Self-published, 22 pages

Dobson, Wayne: Dobson’s choice e-book ©2002 by Wayne Dobson, An Englishman in New York

Bakner, Gérard: Virtual Magie Forum website ©2003 (June 22th) is a different more modern French version

Sweet Girl: Deck of Cards ©2003 gospel country song adapted from Tex Tyler but transposing this time Richard Middleton’s story to an anonymous American soldier in the Afghanistan scene

Dennis Loomis: The Legend of Southside Johnny ©2003 by http://www.loomismagic.com is a reworking of a story effect for the Aronson Stack. This was originally created in 2001 by Doug Brewer who wrote the story and Paul Thomey who put it in verse. Because they realized that Simon Aronson wasn’t doing anything with it either hey granted permission to Dennis Loomis to release the version he had written to adapt their work to his personality.

Steinmeyer, Jim: Magic Magazine ©February 2004 by Jim Steinmeyer, Magic Magazine, Conjuring #67: True Tales from the Newsstand offers a story effect that uses magazines like the Sam the Bellhop story uses cards

D’Alfonso, Al: Magic Magazine September ©2005 Private Ace & Online-Visions.com The on line Journal of the Art of Magic ©2005 by Al d’Alfonso, The Visions Group A Detective Story is the same as the Private Ace routine but with a new title; it ends up using the Joker guarantee card

Grossberg Scott J.: The Linking Ring, ©May 2005 in Tony Econ’s “The Cord Corner,” Scott J. Grossberg's take on Sam The Bellhop appears under the name of "A Chip And A Chair" & "A Chip And A Chair" e-book 2005.

Wardell, Peter: Hustle DVD. ©2006 by RSVP Magic, Russ Stevens. It features Peter's live performance in London, followed by a detailed explanation of routines including The Almanac (Soldier's Prayer Book revisited) This is a 13-card production with meaning and a demonstration of how to make magic more entertaining. A classic lesson in showmanship and presentation

Paul, Michael Risen e-book ©2007 by Michael Paul is a gospel version of the effect

Barnowski, Larry: Kingdom of the Red ©2007 by Larry Barnowski, ch 11 offers the fairy tale which gave the name to the book/DVD told in verse using a deck of cards which is also shown performed on the companion DVD

Malone, Bill : Bill Malone Tips Sam The Bellhop VHS © 2007 by BM Enterprises, the 1998 VHS now on DVD ; Bill Malone has performed this routine in every venue possible including on television and formal close-up shows. What he has done to make the classic Sam the Bellhop story and stack into a reputation making signature routine is add expert blind shuffles and cuts to make the routine impossible and extremely impressive looking. Many magicians have attempted to learn this routine, but they missed the essential ingredients. This DVD uncovers Malone's original dynamics that make the effect flow. If we apply ourself, we can learn a four-minute act that we can use to impress as we entertain.

Hein, Karl: Lecture Notes ©2007 Jack Spade Private Eye is making use of the Heinstein shuffle, a brilliant in hand card cascading false shuffle.

Hollingworth, Guy: Once Upon A Time © 2007 by Guy Hollingworth, sefpublished, combines the charm of fairy tales with the wonder of magic. It contains three charming routines (Cinderella, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, Jack and the Beanstalk) The cars are slightly bigger than regular playing cards and decorated to tell the story with just pictured references. The performance requires the use of simple sleights like a double lift and a double turnover but this makes it really magical. Any magician with false shuffles and a few more sleights could make a very ambitious routine with the tool offered by Guy Hollingworth. Not only new stories in the genre referenced in this bibliography but a new way of handling them. Check the effects produced just by double lifts on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fWkp2iXNYVw&feature=related

Mellers, Mel: Tickling The Mind Vol 2 ©2007 Thinking on Your Feet tells a story with playing cards. Unlike Bill Malone’s approach, the emphasis here is not on flashy sleight of hand but on sometimes sex oriented puns. Mellers’ brilliant routine is performed with jumbo cards but could be performed with regular-sized playing cards. He appears to be making the story up as he goes along, which adds to the entertainment. Since Mellers is a British performer, the story talks about pubs and has other British references which can be adapted

Abbott, Bill: Cabaret Card Magic ©2008 Bill Abbott, p 16 The Last Romance of Diamond Jack: Abbott's version of the Diamond Jack story

Burger, Eugene: Greater Magic Video Library Vol 4: Eugene Burger DVD ©2008 by Stevens Magic Emporium, Diamond Jack is the classic routine but with Eugene Burger intertwining dramatic storytelling and penetrating magic & World Greatest Magic by the World Greatest Magicians © 2009, L & L Publishing; a re-edition of the Stevens Magic Emporium release.

Benton, Colin: Gideon The Fighter © 2008 by Colin Benton, FCMUK (Fellowship of Christian Magicians United Kingdom) tells the story of Gideon: the story requires a full deck of 54 playing cards with blue backs plus an extra blank card.

Jay, Joshua: Vegas Visit Marketed effect (Props and DVD) ©2008 by Joshua Jay. It's like Six Card Repeat meets Sam The Bellhop! While recalling your last visit to Las Vegas, you display a handful of credit cards. No matter how many times you discard them, you always have five cards in your hand! The cards change from credit cards to plane tickets to tarot cards to Vegas show tickets and more. In the end, they transform into a Royal Flush in Spades...the perfect ending to your Vegas Visit!

Fletcher, Whiskey: Sam the Call Girl marketed effect © 2008 circa by Whiskey Fletcher, The Visions Group: The story is all about a hooker named Sam and her solicitous johns, after all, so you can't expect hearts and flowers and a Walt Disney ending. This is not just a few "***s" and "hells" and the f-word or two. This type of effects don't get raunchier, more pornographic, or hilariously revolting than this, but they don't get nearly as plain funny, either. The presentation is solid, which is a tough thing to pull off with a story-deck. Whiskey uses the Shapeshifter Change without description, so if you're not familiar with it you'll have to look that one up. Also, the routine itself would benefit from some sort of set-up for performing this in the first place -- it seems a little rushed just to start flipping cards and telling a story without a lead-in

Pollock, Kerry: Kate and Edith Marketed effect ©2008 by Doc Eason Magic, a long out of print and one of the funniest rhymed patter routines in magic. Scripts from Kerry Pollock, Dan Garrett, Doug Slater, RJ Owens and Doc Eason are included in pdf form so that, once we have chosen the version we want to use, we can download and print it & World Greatest Magic by the World Greatest Magicians © 2009, L & L Publishing; Doc Eason’s performance only.

Kozmo: Tales from The Streets: a Guide to Performing Magic on the Streets DVD ©2008 by Kozmo Magic: The World’s Greatest Card Trick & The Magic Newswire MNW 186 Kozmo ©Feb 2010 by Dodd Vickers, The Spirit of Magic offers Kozmo’s thoughts about effects like "Sam the Bellhop" that he not really considers as being magic, but he certainly makes magicians pause, reflect and look at things through a new lenses

Smith, Jerry M.: Playing Cards and the Bible © 2008 http://www.articlelistworld.com Richard Middleton appears now as a United States soldier

Sutton, Tim: The Magic Circular ©January 2009 by Tim Sutton, p. 8-9 Hopping Henry is a Henry VII story apparently made up as the cards are shuffled and cut.

Aevans: Cowboys-Meaning-Of-A-Deck-Of-Cards © 2009 by Aevans, http://hubpages.com/hub/Cowboys-Meaning-Of-A-Deck-Of-Cards this is a short revival of the classic Richard Middletown story as revisited by Cowboy Copas. It goes up only one suit of cards before discussing generalities about the number of cards in the deck but the text is very slightly different from the 1960 Lloyd Estel Copas’ one.
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magicfish
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Two good lists here. Just wanted to add to Kent's list that After Hours by David Regal is actually from Constant Fooling. I really enjoyed this version when I first worked through it. I've never really liked Sam the Bellhop or any of the "relatives" I've read or seen performed. But I don't mind David Regal's. Just my opinion.
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Thank you so much, Lawrence O, or should I say 'Merci beaucoup'.

And thank you very much, too, kentfgunn.

Bato William
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Quote:
On 2010-06-28 23:38, bishthemagish wrote:
Before Sam the bellhop was known in Chicago there was a trick called Mo and Sam that was in the book The Last word on cards by W. F. (Rufus) Steel. Frank Everheart who was a magician that was performing at a place called the Ivanhoe was the first magician known to do Sam The Bellhop in Chicago.

He was the one that wrote up the trick that was sold by Magic Inc.

There is more to the story but a lot of it is hearsay and what I remember reading when I got the trick from Magic Inc. What can I say it has been a few years. If I remember right Bill Malone took this trick and made a miracle out of it. There were a few other magicians doing it in Chicago as well at the time.

I hope this helps.

Quote:
On 2010-06-29 00:06, pepka wrote:
Interesting that you bring up this book Bish. I have an autographed copy, signed "To my very good friend, Walter Gibson sincerly Rufus Steele." Then a date, which I can't quite recall, but I believe it's '57

I really like the old Rufus Steele books there are a lot of great classic card ideas hidden in those books Mo and Sam reads a lot like Sam The Bellhop but in Sam the bellhop the Mo person is droped from the story.

I hope this helps.
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Unless I somehow missed it, not included in Lawrence O's incredible list is, "King Of Club Entertainers" - Chuck Smith from his 1994 "What If" lecture notes.
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Cgscpa and helder: you linked me to the same video!

Bato William
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There is another one called "The Legend of Southside Johnny". I don't know who authored this effect.
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Btw, I really love doc eason's version of sam the bellhop lol

its basically magician seems to fail and just make story as it goes but

finish clean in the end. he performed once to me and ppl and it was...

just too fun lol
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Quote:
On 2010-06-28 20:32, Bato William wrote:
What other effects are related to Malone's 'Sam The Bellhop'?

By this I mean effects where the deck is constantly being shuffled and cut, and most of the deck, or the entire deck, is dealt out to tell a story between the cuts and shuffles?

Bato William


Michael Baker's "The Last Adventure of Diamond Jack" is the one I use.
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