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mvmagic
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This is certainly nothing novel, but I just couldn't live without it...

Get a steel sheet and a lot of different magnets (square) and you can create on infinite number of jigs.
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Michael Baker
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Quote:
On 2012-01-02 06:13, mvmagic wrote:
This is certainly nothing novel, but I just couldn't live without it...

Get a steel sheet and a lot of different magnets (square) and you can create on infinite number of jigs.


mvmagic, I like this idea. Please give an example of how it may be used.
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mvmagic
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Certainly!

Lets say you need to make a frame of certain size. Just place your wood on the sheet metal and put magnets around the pieces (I usually use two magnets on both sides of the wood) to keep them in place while gluing. If your magnets are square and large enough, you can use them at the corners as well.

You can customize your sheet by drawing straight lines at intervals of your liking (use a straight edge) to have guides on it.

Instead of just magnets, you can get varying lengths of steel or aluminum angle (I have 2" by 2" angle) to make yourself jig pieces. Get some round magnets, drill corresponding size holes on the angle, make sure the magnets are flush with the bottom surface of the angle and from the top, glue them into place with a generous amount of epoxy (or whatever you like).

You can also take two identical pieces of steel plate and put a few magnets between them to make an instant jig piece which will stick to the "main plate" as well.

Really your imagination is the limit here! You really can create jigs for almost any need with a system like this. You can add magnets to existing clamps to further expand the possibilities.

I got the inspiration years ago from this product:

http://www.micromark.com/magnetic-gluing......038.html (Cut and paste, the comma breaks the link)
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AGMagic
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OK, this is an easy one. The top of a plastic butter tub makes a great glue holder when you are brushing glue onto your parts. Just put a puddle of glue on the lid and use it for your glue up. The lid doesn't get soggy from the glue and when the unused glue dries it will peel right off the lid.
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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AGMagic
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Love the steel plate and magnet idea!
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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When I'm hand painting details, I find that the bottom of an empty soda can makes a perfect paint pot; just break off the tab and flip it upside down. Nice little dished area for mixing small amounts!
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mvmagic
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Now this is not a tip per se, but a brand recommendation...If using an airbrush to paint props, Wicked Colors are amazing to paint with. They will stick even when reduced 800% and work on pretty much anything from a T-shirt to car bodies-and I have used them on many things from t-shirts to metal (no cars though). The one issue I have had with them is that they don't mix well. They do mix but will separate in a few minutes. But the spraying capabilities outweigh that.
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AGMagic
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Michael, I used your very first tip in this post last weekend to straighten up some 1/8 inch maple to get it ready for inlay. I taped the maple to a piece of hardboard and it worked like a charm! I knew of this trick, but had never really needed it before. Thanks for the reminder!
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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AGMagic
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Does anyone have any plastic or metal working tips to share?
Tim Silver - http://www.facebook.com/pages/Magic-Woodshop/122578214436546

I know you believe you understand what you think I said, but I am not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.

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Leland Stone
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Simple metal tip I picked up at a knifemaking workshop: Store your files in sections of PVC pipe. Cheap, easy to cut (and even stack into 'file cabinets!') and NOW your files won't be knocking together in toolbox or on the shelf in your shop.

Also, don't assume that since the stock you found in the scrap pile used to be a coil spring, it will therefore make a dandy woodworking gouge, only to find out (after forging a bolster and lavishing hand filing on the hammered blank) that it can't be hardened to more than Rc25. But I digress. :0/
Michael Baker
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We have just been honored with a sticky, my friends! A first for The Workshop!! Keep the great info coming!

~michael
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Ray Tupper.
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When sanding moulds or intricate carved work during finishing,use a scotchbrite
scouring pad rather than wire wool.Less mess and easier to handle.
They can also be used for bare metal to achieve a brushed finish.
Available in a variety of different grades,from fine to extra coarse.
http://www.vikingtapes.co.uk/Abrasives/3......rite.htm
(UK link)
Ray.
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Bob1Dog
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Michael, great idea for a thread and congrats on coming up with a sticky!

I don't have a tip, but rather a question that will probably require a tip from someone reading through this thread. This isn't really a workshop question, but I tried posting it elsewhere in the Workshop forum and it hasn't gotten any response, so perhaps I can try it here. Here goes....

I'm restoring a old MAK French Wrist Chopper. It's old and rickety and the last time I tested it before a performance, one of the spacer shims fell off and rendered the trick useless so I axed it for the performance. I was actually going to throw it in the garbage because MAK doesn't make a quality chopper; at least this one isn't.

My wife convinced me that I should look it over before trashing it, and I did. I took the whole thing apart, and found that all it really needed was some new glue and tightening up. However, in my test failure, the blade got stuck and jammed in the bottom, marring the surface pretty badly. I took some emery cloth and a file to the aluminum blade dings and realized I would have to put a lot of elbow work into re polishnig the blade, and the effect just isn't worth that much labor to me.

So I thought, why not age the blade? Rough it up a bit and stain it somehow so that it gives the appearance of old blood stains on it. It is after all an old prop I purchased from someone for about $75 and I only used it twice. I introduce it as an old device anyway, that might be "well, a little rusty in some places." So aging the blade might add to the effect.

Any ideas on how to make that blade look old, worn and bloody without the blood?

If this isn't the appropriate place, perhaps a suggestion on where to post? Thanks folks.
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Michael Baker
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Hi Bob,

I was going to reference this thread.

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......forum=26

But, it seems you have already found it. I am not an expert working with metal, although I suspect your techniques will be based on whether the blade is steel or aluminum (I don't know which MAK uses for their chopper).

~michael
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Bob1Dog
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Hi Michael, it's aluminum. I'll play around with it a little.

I might just not put a band-aid on my finger or whatever, the next time I bleed a little in my shop. That happens a lot, so I'll just keep letting the blood stains pile up! I'm sure after playing around with it I'll find the right reactive agent that will help it all along. It's not major on my to-do list. I don't like the quality of the thing to begin with. I've already changed the drop bag from the original cheap felt that's stapled in place and made a nice black satin drape. It actually looks a lot better and does a better job of hiding the rubber hand I keep in there for the climax.

Anyway, thanks for getting back! Best, Bob
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chrom
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Nice thread! I am a hobbiest woodworker and just recently got into learning magic. So far its been a blast and when I saw this thread I felt right at home. A couple of recommendations as I have done everything from small puzzle boxes to lathe work and I even built my own CNC. For small pieces you are trying to cut I highly recommend using a combination of a sliding sled, like the one pictured a few posts back, and a Micro Jig GRR Riper. Whats nice about it is you can span across the blade with pieces as small as 1/8 inch. Then if you combo this with a riving knife (if your table saw supports it) its a breeze to make each cut. I was making puzzle boxes out of 1/8" plywood and it was a snap. The other recommendation I would make would be to pick up some double sided pressure or turner's tape. Its great for holding pieces while you work on them and I have used it to secure bowls while turning them on a lathe. The stuff is very strong and great with small parts.

One final tip, I can't remember if you posted it with your straw idea from earlier, but when doling any glue up, if you wait about 30 minutes or so after you have clamped everything together the glue starts to congeal. It is still plyable but is hard enough to easily remove with your weapon of choice. I personally use an old cheap sharpened chisel but the straw idea will work just as well.

Hope this helps.


Shane
Michael Baker
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Hi Shane,

Welcome to The Magic Café, and welcome to the workshop!

Thanks for your tips! I'm taking the liberty of posting a link to the Micro Jig GRR Riper. I had not seen that before, but it looks like a great device!

Regarding the straw to scrape up glue squeeze-out, the best use for that is when working with hardwoods that will have any penetrating finish that leaves the grain visible. The advantage is that the excess glue goes up inside the straw, rather than possibly being spread into the wood grain, where it would affect the finish.

For general glue scrape-ups, I keep most of the trimmings from my metal cutter. Those little scraps of brass, aluminum and steel make handy scrapers, and can be cut to a variety of lengths, widths, and angles. They're also disposable, and save the time of cleaning tools!
~michael baker
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chrom
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Thanks Michael for posting the link. I do not yet know of all the rules surrounding posting of links etc. I like your straw idea as well. I was only pointing that if you wait until the glue is a little dry it is easy to manage and remove without affecting the future stain. That being said most of the glue ups I have done are large enough projects that by the time I have all the clamps applied (you can imagine how many clamps) the glue is just perfect to get up.

Thanks for the welcome!

Shane
Michael Baker
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Yes, I understood, Shane. Maybe down the road we'll have enough combined info to start a completely new thread just on joinery! Ha! There are entire books dedicated to the subject. Smile

Ok, in order to stay true to this thread, let me offer a tip for more shop tips...

Each of us likely won't have the same programming, but my local PBS station runs "The Woodsmith Shop" on Saturday afternoons. It's really a very informative show, but even if you don't have this on your local programming, I'll suggest you go to their website, and sign up for the email shop tips.

http://www.woodsmithshop.com/
~michael baker
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Chance Wolf
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Here is a wood filling/gluing tip that I use on all of my hardwood projects. It may seem a bit laborious but it is well worth the effort. It kind of kills two birds with one stone.
This method prevents the glue from getting into the wood grain which sometimes ruins the staining process as the glue will resist stain even if you think you have wiped it away.
Apply strips of easy release Blue Tape on all surfaces right on each edge of the joint where the glue would typically squeeze out. Glue and clamp as usual and take a lightly moist paper towel to wipe off seeping glue.
Peel the tape off after the glue has dried.
This same method can be used when using wood fillers. Mask off the area to be filled. Apply filler and sand down level. Remove tape and finish sand. This not only minimizes the filler exposure but ti also protects the wood from over sanding.

One last tip.
When you need to set a depth on your drill bit, use a Whit Out Pen to make your depth mark on the bit. These pens are available at any office supply store. The white paint/ink dries fast on the bit and stays on long enough to get thru any job. The pens have a ball point tip and a shaker/mixing ball in them. They are about 3" long and blue with a white label. These pens also work awesome on to make indicator marks or lines on dark surfaces. You will find a lot of places to use them once you have one. Plus they do NOT dry out.

Hope this helps. I will drop in more tips as they come to mind.
Chance
Creator of Wacky Wolf Productions & Fine Collectibles

A DECADE of building Magic and we're just getting started!

http://www.wolfsmagic.com
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