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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workshop » » Spray Painting in cold weather - questions (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Ron Reid
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Phoenix, Arizona
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Hello All:

I live in the Phoenix, Arizona area and for the next couple of weeks, high temperatures should be in the 50's which is cold for us. In the past, I've gotten some "Orange Peel" when painting in cold weather - 40's - so I've always avoiding doing it. I use Krylon which says it can be used when temperatures are from 50's to 90's.

I'm painting metal tubes - will it help to keep them in the house (70 degrees) before taking them out to be painted?

The spray paint cans - should I keep them in the house too?

Any suggestions will be appreciated. All of my painting right now is going to be on metal...no wood. Unfortunately, I can't do anything inside...maybe, someday!

Thanks for any help.

Ron
Bill Hegbli
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By all means keep the products in the house before taking them out to be used.

I would think that the metal tubes would be colder then current air temperature. Place the products in a sunny area, that may raise the temperature and warm up the tube a few degrees. If you have a large cardboard box to put the parts in, will also help to keep the wind blowing dirt on the prop.

Those are my thoughts and experience with outside painting.
Graduate of Chavez College of Prestidigitation and Showmanship
jazzy snazzy
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This is a big problem for me this time of year.
The wife goes bonkers when I bring all my paint in for the winter.

I hope to make a small spray booth out of one of those portable wardrobes.
A vinyl covering over a plastic frame.
This would only be good for small items.

Paint must be kept warm. I lost everything that was stored next to the cellar wall last year.
Another plan is a propane heater in the garage for spraying.
This means the air in the compressor should probably be warm too.

Fortunately we have a couple of more days above 50 degrees.
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
Ron Reid
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Thank you, Bill and JS. Just to confirm...one of the causes for orange peel is cold paint. Is that right? My understanding is if the paint droplets are too cold, they won't flatten out propery on the surface of what I'm painting.

Ron
jazzy snazzy
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Yes, at least 50 degrees. The warmer the better.
"The secret of life is to look good from a distance."
-Charles Schulz
IDOTRIX
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Yes Ron 50 degrees and above. another tip on spray paint, when getting close to the can being empty run it under hot water and it puts pressure in the can so you can squeeze out the last drop. BTW Ron, your work is amazing.
Michael Baker
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I move all my paint indoors, or at least into the basement when it gets cold. The same goes for any liquids and semi-solids... glues, stains, wood fillers, etc.

Here is something I learned years ago...

I was helping my girl friend's father do some touch-up painting to head off a rusted area on her car's fender. He set up a clamp-on heat lamp to keep the area to be sprayed warm. The can was kept in a pocket, or at least under the coat, so that body heat kept it warm. Full cans will hold the heat longer than empty cans, and certainly longer than the metal tubes you plan to paint.

50 degrees is cold, but not terrible. We painted the car's fender outside when it was in the teens!

You might consider fabricating a makeshift spray booth if for only one purpose... to warm up the inside with a couple lamps. Warm up the pieces, then open it up long enough to shoot a coat of paint and close it back up again.

If I recall, it was Tabman who said his father taught him to warm spray cans in a pan of water.

To Jazzy: I had to make the decision last year when I moved to Illinois, how to heat my garage. Several people told me that propane heaters in enclosed placed will cause headaches. For that reason, I bought a kerosene heater, and do not regret doing so. The smell is not bad. You get a little when you first fire it up, and when you shut it down. Otherwise, it does the job quite nicely. Some days, I use a lot of kerosene just bringing the room up to a good working temperature, but it beats not being able to work.
~michael baker
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Anverdi-museum
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Generally the warmer to better when spray painting, this time of the year is rough. My wife cannot stand the smell of paint, she immediately knows when spraying is going on in the basement.

Be sure to use a fan(s) in the basement to circulate the fumes.


Chuck C.
Bill Hegbli
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I do not recommend painting in the basement, besides the pilot lights from gas furnances and water heaters, I almost killed myself once. The fumes do not rise, they stay low on the ground.

Also the overspray that you cannot even see, gets all over the place. I made a make shift paint booth and when I took it down, overspray was all over the floor.

That idea Michael Baker had was a good one I think, get a box and put a clamp light on the edge. That will keep the part warm, do it outside.
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Ray Tupper.
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What sheen level are you trying to achieve Ron.Gloss,satin,matt?
There are multiple post painting methods to rectify imperfections.
Cheers,Ray.
If you close the door the night could last for ever,leave the sunshine out and say 'hello' to never
Ron Reid
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Hello All:

Sorry for the delay in posting results. This coming weekend should be much warmer...in the high 60's. I did some experiementing and things went fine. I kept my paints in the house and when I went out, I kept them in the sun while they weren't being used. I did the same with the metal tubes I'm painting. I just primered them, and the paint went on fine.

I put the coats on extra lightly. I'm going to put the color coat on next weekend, followed by waterslide decals, and finally the clear coats. I won't be able to do it all next weekend, but that's the order. My color coat will be satin, but the clear coat will be high gloss. I like the way satin color coats goe on better than gloss.

I'm also going to try putting my spray cans in warm/hot water. There is quite a bit of information about this when I Googled it.

IDOTRIX: Thanks for the compliment and encouraging words. I'm on a never-ending quest to improve my techniques and results, and I appreciate the encouragement I get here.

Again, thanks for the help, everyone. More ideas are welcome.

Ron
thegreatnippulini
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Ron, put the metal tubes in a toaster oven for a short amount of time on a low setting. That may help, but don't overheat, you don't want to cook the paint either!
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
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MentalistCreationLab
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It is always too hot or too cold here in Ohio, one thing you may want to try when using rattle cans is place the can upright in some hot water. The can will retain some of the heat for a period of time and allow the paint to flow freely. This can also work in reverse when its too hot the paint will dry very fast in the air before it hits the object. Putting the can in cool water can sometimes help.

However I noticed you mentioned orange peel, that can be caused from all sorts of things here is a site that covers the causes very well.

http://pc.dupont.com/dpc/en/US/html/visi......eel.html

Just something to keep in mind in an extreme climate. Also as of recent some of the rattle cans I used have way too much thinner. That could also be the problem.
Ron Reid
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Hello All:

Here is an update of my experiences. I've done quite a bit of experimenting over the last two months and have had some good results and some bad results painting in colder weather. Long story short...I've decided not to do any painting in weather less than 70 degrees which is pretty easy in the Phoenix area.

We've had a very mild winter with a few days in the 70's, many in the 60's, and a few in the 50's. Primer does not go on nearly as well in the 50's and 60's. Satin and flat spray paint are much easier to deal with than gloss in colder weather - I'm not sure why. In the 50's, the paint starts separating once it hits the surface...nothing terrible, but I need it to be perfect.

The last two weekends have been in the upper 70's. Spray paint goes on perfectly with no orange peel.

A weird thing that I can't figure out...it's never happened to me before, but I've never tried painting in the 50's or 60's. I put a glossy clear coat over the color coat, and all of a sudden, stains start coming to the surface. It looks like someone was reading the newspaper and then handled the prop with dirty fingers. Needless to say, I've had to strip down everything and start over which is very frustrating. So, in the future, I won't be doing any painting in the colder weather unless I can figure out a solution to some of the problems I've been having.

Ron
Michael Baker
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Ron,

I'd imagine we each develop our own processes and tricks depending on where we do the work. I've had to adjust some things after moving from Alabama to Illinois. I'd bet that your techniques would be challenged here, as mine would be if I tried to paint where you live.

The clear coat/stain thing has me at a loss, though. I've never seen or heard of that happening.

~michael
~michael baker
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Ron Reid
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Hi Michael:

Yes, I think you're right on with your comments. The longer I paint, the more I realize that environmental factors play such an important role. At least that's my experience.

I did test out the Painters Touch brand from Home Depot, something I've been meaning to do for years. I really like their Satin paints, but not the glossy. In colder weather, I either had orange peel or lifting...one or the other. I could never find just the right amount to put on with the glossy. The satin paints went on very well. Their clear coat was excellent too, but I was really careful not to put it on too heavy.

The Painters Touch gives much better coverage than Krylon, but I've been using Krylon for so long, I'm used to the multiple coats and have developed my own system for getting a satisfactory result. I wish Krylon had a red that's as bright as Painters Touch.

Here's a Don Alan Egg Can done with Painter's Touch. I'm now using McGuire's Ultimate Compound on the final clear coat.

Image


And some Tea Canisters also done with Painter's Touch...notice how bright the red is.

Image


I still dream of the day when I'll have an inside room with no wind and a climate controlled 75 degrees at all times. And perfect lighting as well!

Ron
francisngkl
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So beautiful! Always a joy to look at the items you have completed, Ron.

Francis
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Wizard of Oz
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I finally bought my first effect by Ron right here on The Café. It's a set of Tricky Bottles. I was completely blown away by the quality.
We are so lucky to have him in the magic community. I look forward to adding more to my collection.
Pay no attention to that man behind the curtain.
thegreatnippulini
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Ron, that is simply amazing work.` With skills like that, you could make a good amount of money in restoration work.
The Great Nippulini: body piercer, Guinness World Record holder, blacksmith and man with The World's Strongest Nipples! Does the WORLD care? We shall see...
http://www.greatnippulini.com
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