The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » What happened, was this... » » What is the craziest story you've heard about your own performance? (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Kameron Messmer
View Profile
Special user
Billings, MT
691 Posts

Profile of Kameron Messmer
Forgive me if someone has posted this before...
After seeing this article:http://www.freakonomics.com/2012/04/27/messing-with-memory/
about how "alarmingly easy to create false memories for people, even when they know an event didn’t happen. "

What is the craziest story you heard about your own performance?

I did a show and got a call the next day from someone who couldn't make it to the previous show. She told me she heard about my show and how I flew around the room and all this crazy stuff. I didn't do anything close to that. It turns out the client tried to tell her about my show, but she wasn't quite paying attention, so the client started messing with her. She heard THAT part. Anyways, she book another show, but what is YOUR crazy story?
Michael Baker
View Profile
Inner circle
Near a river in the Midwest
9876 Posts

Profile of Michael Baker
I listened to a re-telling, and apparently I made this guy's signed card magically appeared in his own wallet.

Someone else told their friend that I made a bowling ball appear under my hat. (It was only a cannonball, but I'll never tell. Smile )
~michael baker
The Magic Company
J-L Sparrow
View Profile
Regular user
127 Posts

Profile of J-L Sparrow
Great idea for a topic, Kameron!

In his book Magic: The Complete Course, Joshua Jay gives instructions on making a home-made Invisible Deck. He also gives a new routine for it, which has a few advantages over the classic routine. His routine is this:

Pretend to give the spectator an invisible deck of cards and have him/her pick one, name it, and then put back into its invisible box. Then open an (apparently empty) paper bag (the kind used for sack lunches) and, while holding the bag, invite the spectator to toss the imaginary deck of cards into the bag. Right after the deck is thrown, the sound of a deck of cards landing in the bag is heard. The magician then takes out the deck -- now clearly visible -- then opens the card box, then spreads the cards from hand to hand with the cards facing towards the spectator. However, one card is found to be facing the other way. The spectator takes this card, flips it over, and it is revealed to be the selected card!

So I did this trick for a friend, and it succeeded in baffling her. I didn't know it until later, but afterwards she went to a mutual friend's father (who is also a magician) to ask him how I did the trick. (He wouldn't tell.) Later I did the trick for the same father explaining to him that it was Joshua Jay's routine. After I finished the trick for him, he realized that this trick I had just performed for him was the same trick she was asking him about, but she described it in such an odd way that it wasn't clear to him (until then) which trick I had done.

You're reading this second hand, but basically one of the things she said about me and my routine was:

"He took all the cards and stuffed them in a paper bag and then pulled out my card."

Granted, her description may not sound so impressive, but if you add a few details with just the right wording (such as "first it wasn't there and then it was!") it can make a listener think something grand and ineffable happened.

-- J-L
Atom3339
View Profile
Inner circle
2992 Posts

Profile of Atom3339
It seems to be true that generally people hear and see only about 25% of what we communicate. It may not be a bad idea to say and show things in a few DIFFERENT ways for perception to "sink in."

(Hope you got at least 25% of that). Smile
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Joackes
View Profile
New user
23 Posts

Profile of Joackes
Quote:
On 2012-05-26 11:50, Atom3339 wrote:
It seems to be true that generally people hear and see only about 25% of what we communicate. It may not be a bad idea to say and show things in a few DIFFERENT ways for perception to "sink in."

(Hope you got at least 25% of that). Smile


Or say that you do things you don't do (like I never touched the deck and then you chose a card), since they will probably just remember the ending and then think back on how we got their and remember your words. In that way you can turn your tricks into real magic, atleast in their memories.
Herr Brian Tabor
View Profile
Special user
West Virginia
660 Posts

Profile of Herr Brian Tabor
A few years ago, I did an effect for people at a youth group. I put a penny in their hand and waved over it, turning it into a dime. After about a week, word got back to me that not only did I levitate and allow someone to run a broom under my feet to prove I was really doing it, but when a phone rang in their kitchen, I held out my hand and it flew to me so I could answer it. That was always funny to me.
griffindance
View Profile
Regular user
126 Posts

Profile of griffindance
I try to be as honest as a magician can be. ie "There's no supernatural force here, I've learnt some tricks."
So at an aftershow party Im doing some IT tricks with some mental magic and the ocassional card effect whilst talking about people like Popoff, Hydrick and Sylvia Brown. All the while explaining that magicians know the methods that these people use and how easy it is to fool the public with a bit of bulls#t. I ended the magic with a demo of a street magic levitation and a "goodnight." Seeing the people the next day at the theatre I kept getting asked how "I flew and would I pretty please teach them for work."
The magic worked but I guess the public service announcement failed.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » What happened, was this... » » What is the craziest story you've heard about your own performance? (0 Likes)
<<< Previous Topic Next Topic >>>
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001- 2014 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.070120 seconds, requiring 26 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

[1] [0] [5] [9] [0] [3] [1] [3] [6] [4]