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seraph127
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"Substitution Envelope Mystery"
The Card Magic of Le Paul, pp. 143-6
Skill Level: Early Intermediate

Effect: A card is chosen and replaced. The top card of the deck is shown and placed face down in an envelope. The envelope is placed in the middle of the deck with the sandwiched envelope is turned end-for-end three times. The envelope and all the cards above it are lifted. There is the card that was supposed to be in the envelope, face up. In the envelope is the original selection.

It's a bleeding shame how long I've had this book and yet it's only in the last couple of days I've really studied it. What an overlooked classic.
There are many tricks, and many effects, but rarely a Grand Effect. There are many entertainers, but few real magicians. Many technicians, but few artists who use their art to explore their vision. - Derren Brown, Absolute Magic
Atom3339
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I always find something new when I re-read Le Paul's book.
TH

Occupy Your Dream
Vlad_77
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The Dream by Aldo Colombini
Best of Friends III (Harry Lorayne, author) pp. 80-84.

Effect: A card is selected from a red backed deck. The card is lost into the deck which is thoroughly shuffled face up/face down. Suddenly all of the cards magically face the same way except for the selected card. When that card is turned over it is seen that it is the only blue backed card!

Skill level: advanced beginner to early intermediate

I love double punch tricks and this one is another example of Aldo's brilliance. I am certain that many will work out a method and certainly there are other ways to accomplish the effects. But what I love about this routine is that the selection process looks SO good as it is done from a hand to hand spread locking in the fact that this is a red backed deck - and there are no gaffs. The trick is Brainwave without the think of a card and gaffed deck and of course it is also a Triumph variant. The handling is very convincing, i.e, there is nothing contrived about "proving" it is a red deck. Additionally, there is a beautiful sleight in there that is worth a look.

Aldo presented it as a sort of story about a dream he had about the spectator and the card - hence the title.

The trick requires a very easy set up and Harry Lorayne offers a completely impromptu version PLUS an additional effect in his "Afterthoughts" section. So, if you have Best of Friends III check this one out, or rather, check these three out. Triumph is a popular effect and I cannot fathom how many variants there are. This one is a worthy addition to the body of work on this Vernon classic.

Best,
Vlad

PS: I just noticed a thread asking about the "best" Triumph. Well, I don't believe in the concept of "best" in magic. That said, The Dream certainly qualifies as a superb Triumph variant.
magicfish
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Funny thing, Vlad, my random book selection tonight was Best of Friends III. I took it off my shelf and read for about an hour.
I have definitely overlooked this one.
Ill be looking it up tomorrow. Thank you sir.
seraph127
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"Invisible Sandwich"
Ben Harris, Off the Wall, pp. 51-3
Skill Level - Advanced

Two mates are removed from the deck, for example, the red Kings. A card is selected and returned. The mates are placed face up on top and bottom of the deck. In a flash the Kings vanish. The deck is spread and the Kings are seen in the middle - the spread is split between them. The spectators are told that the Kings are sandwiching the selection, but it's invisible. The Kings are tossed to the table and a face down card appears between them, which, of course, is the selection.
There are many tricks, and many effects, but rarely a Grand Effect. There are many entertainers, but few real magicians. Many technicians, but few artists who use their art to explore their vision. - Derren Brown, Absolute Magic
David Martin
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"Remote Control"
Theodore Annemann
Encyclopedia of Card Tricks pg. 121
Skill Level-Beginner

Imagine this: You're performing a set with a pack of red cards. At any point you can remove a blue card from your pocket and stick it, sight unseen, somewhere in the red pack of cards.

You then spread the pack of cards face up on the table or in the hands and give the spectator the task of using their intuition to find the blue card. Despite the freedom the choice and all the chances you give them to change their mind, the spectator WILL ALWAYS choose the blue card!

This is a wonderful item to include in any card set. The lack of manipulation on the part of the performer and the abundance of freedom of choice on the part of your audience makes this direct effect extremely disarming!
Vlad_77
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Quote:
On Nov 13, 2014, David Martin wrote:
Remote Control
Theodore Annemann
Encyclopedia of Card Tricks pg. 121
Skill Level-Beginner

Imagine this: You're performing a set with a pack of red cards. At any point you can remove a blue card from your pocket and stick it, sight unseen, somewhere in the red pack of cards.

You then spread the pack of cards face up on the table or in the hands and give the spectator the task of using their intuition to find the blue card. Despite the freedom the choice and all the chances you give them to change their mind, the spectator WILL ALWAYS choose the blue card!

This is a wonderful item to include in any card set. The lack of manipulation on the part of the performer and the abundance of freedom of choice on the part of your audience makes this direct effect extremely disarming!


Nice one David and you have demonstrated why Magicfish and I started an informal competition a few years ago to see what we could find in our own libraries. This grew into two long threads in Secret Sessions and now here. I have had The Encyclopedia of Card Tricks for eons, I am a huge Annemann fan, and yet this one slipped under my radar.

I am beginning to believe that this happens to a lot of us and reminds me of the maxim in magic that "if you want to hide something, put it in print." A few years ago there was some talk about the Mene-Tekel deck and a few of us were discussing it as best we could on the open forum and lo and behold, Nathan Kranzo decided to revisit this still underused deck and produced a spiffy production of new effects with it.

I am really glad that there has been so much participation in this thread and I believe there have been close to 1500 views!

@Seraph, I really like the Ben Harris effect you posted but I don't think I have Off the Wall. I wonder if this was part of the project he started four years ago called The Backstory Project. It was an infrequent series of releases of all the material he had created up to 2011. I don't remember this manuscript being part of it and The Backstory Project kind of fizzled out. I'll have to see if I can find this somewhere. Thanks for the heads up!

@Magicfish, while you're checking out the Colombini trick in BoFIII, have a look at the effect that follows it called Faster Triumph which begins on page 85. It's pretty cool. Smile

Best,
Vlad
Terrible Wizard
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I'll be looking into that Annemann one ... sounds interesting Smile
Terrible Wizard
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Just read it. Very cheeky Smile Might think about that one some more ...
David Martin
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Quote:
On Nov 13, 2014, Vlad_77 wrote:

Nice one David and you have demonstrated why Magicfish and I started an informal competition a few years ago to see what we could find in our own libraries. This grew into two long threads in Secret Sessions and now here. I have had The Encyclopedia of Card Tricks for eons, I am a huge Annemann fan, and yet this one slipped under my radar.


Thank you Vlad! I'm glad that I could share with you one of the many gems buried in that book. I hope you have fun with it!

Quote:
On Nov 14, 2014, Terrible Wizard wrote:
Just read it. Very cheeky Smile Might think about that one some more ...


I'm so glad you decided to check it out Terrible Wizard. Smile It is very cheeky. I can tell you that this effect of Annemann's plays very big! I sincerely hope you give it a try and it plays well for you too!
Vlad_77
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Choice Choice by J.K. Hartman in Card Dupery pp. 331-336.

Effect: A spectator selects a card, adds it to a dozen or so indifferent cards and shuffles the packet. He next distributes the cards face down in any random pattern. The performer, holding the deck several inches above the table, carries it over each of the tabled cards. He repeats this process until the spectator tells him to stop. The card over which the deck is hovering is picked up beneath it. The performers turns each of the other face down cards left on the table face up asking whether each card is original selection. The answer is "no" throughout. "In that case, it must be this one," says the performer; turning the deck face-up on the table - and so it is.

Skill level: intermediate

J.K. Hartman occupies an interesting place in magic. His work is well known and respected but at the same time, his work is also the best kept secret in magic. I've always thought of his ingenious work as underground magic public for all to see. He also has a gift for revising existing and new tricks and routines by others and adding an extra kick to them. He is a very private person who loves magic for its own sake. He's not a professional yet his work influenced/influences the work of many professionals.

This trick may read as though it's not strong but consider:

1. The selection is genuine - no forces. You do not have any knowledge of the card until it is revealed. Inferior methods would allow for a peek or whatever.
2. The SPECTATOR shuffles the cards and the SPECTATOR deals the cards in any order and pattern she wishes and no, you don't have to estimate or keep track of the selection. The effect is exactly as it appears to your audience.
3. The trick can be done with any deck - even an incomplete one - so no gaffs and no "paper."

I labeled this trick as intermediate because for best effect it requires an important sleight from Marlo although other sleights may be substituted. Hartman mentions a few of his own but prefers a particular sleight from Marlo. Additionally, a beginner may have trouble creating what Terry Lagerould would label "The Belief State" in this trick. I hasten to add however that there are no "bluffs" going on here.

It's not a walkaraound effect because of the dealing so you would need a table unless you have an opportunity to sit on a floor and perform it. Come to think of it, SOME walkaround situations work very well for this, so, if you look this up and learn it, use your judgment. Smile

I like the "Stop" plot and this one moves at a brisk pace.

I hope you enjoy it!

Best,
Vlad
seraph127
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"Big Deal" by Don Alan
In A Class By Himself: The Legacy of Don Alan, written by Jon Racherbaumer
pp. 63-9
Skill Level: Fairly Easy

Effect: A Jumbo card is removed face down from the performer's pocket. Cards are dealt, one at a time, onto the card and subsequently slid off onto the table until ""stop" is called. The tabled cards are turn face up to show the cards that were passed up. The Jumbo card and the one on back of it are turned over and shown to match. The performer goes to put away the Jumbo card but changes his mind. The remaining cards are riffled til "stop" is called and the spectator takes the stopped-at card. Performer claims he will produce a card half the value of the spectator's selection (wait for it, wait for it...). The selection is revealed to be, say, the Seven of Hearts. The Jumbo card is shown to be the 3 1/2 of clubs.

The first part of the trick is also in Mark Wilson's Complete Course in Magic ("Sympathetic Cards").
There are many tricks, and many effects, but rarely a Grand Effect. There are many entertainers, but few real magicians. Many technicians, but few artists who use their art to explore their vision. - Derren Brown, Absolute Magic
Vlad_77
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The "Best" Lie Detector as unofficially titled by John Luka and routined by Ron Bauer
presented in a column by John Luka in The New TOPS
v.33, n.10, October 1993, pp. 6-10.

NOTE: The New TOPS is available digitally from The Conjuring Arts Research Center as well as Todd Karr's Miracle Factory unless of course you are Byron Walker, Denny Haney, or Jon Greget in which case you have a complete paper run. (I wager my friend Etienne has a complete paper run as well. I am a pauper so my copy is digital).

Effect: It's a lie detector. This is the Workers section and it must logically follow that this is a lie detector routine with cards. (Live long and prosper).

Skill level: easy (John Luka says so Smile )

So, this one is interesting - hence the bizarre titling - and let's get into a bit of history. In the October 1993 issue of The New TOPS, The Café's own John Luka (though there was no Café yet) wrote the first of a series of columns titled "Thoughts On ..." and the column is wonderful. I would compare it favorably to Charlie Miller's Magicana in Genii though obviously it didn't run as long as it was introduced in the penultimate volume of The New TOPS. In this inaugural column John Luka spotlighted the lie detector routine by Ron Bauer. Where it gets interesting for you and me is that Mr. Luka provides us with a comparison to an item that appeared as a cover item in the February 1993 issue of Apocalypse titled The Best Lie Detector, attributed to Marty Kane. (Apocalypse, v.16, n.2, February 1993, pp. 2173-2175)> See what a nice guy I am? I provided the cite to Apocalypse. Smile Actually, I wanted to do this because those who have Apocalypse and The New TOPS can make comparisons between these two routines.

Okay, back to history. John Luka writes that Ron Bauer's routine came about when in 1956 Mr. Bauer had read Martin Gardner's "Improved Lie Speller" from Twelve Tricks with a Borrowed Deck by Martin Gardner. John Luka wrote that Ron Bauer was convinced he could "get more out of the effect and began performing it around the Detroit area" in the late 50s and early 60s. [N.B.: For those new to the art, I want to editorialize a moment here. If you are unfamiliar with Ron Bauer's work, you need to get up to speed. His "Private Studies" series is in the opinion of many experts simultaneously a course in magic as well as performance. Mr. Bauer certainly does "get a LOT more out of routines and I urge you to get thee to a dealer and snag these]. Where was I? Oh yeah, history and such! Mr. Luka states that at the time, no one was performing close-up in the Detroit area at the time and Bob Stencil credits Ron Bauer with introducing professional close-up magic in the Motor City. [Some guy named Larry Jennings would meet Ron Bauer, and, well, the rest IS history]. At the time, Mr. Bauer was also performing the classic Stewart James effect "Further Than That" and he felt that while it was a great routine, that too could be coaxed to yield more.

Enter yet ANOTHER legend, namely pharmacist and magical genius Milt Kort. Ron Bauer was still trying to more out of the James and Gardner effects and Kort (as Stephen Minch writes is what Milt Kort preferred to be called) advised Ron Bauer that when he was trying to solve a magic problem he [Kort] would "work it backwards" - that's reverse engineering for the IT geeks among us. Smile Anyhow, fast forward to 1993 and John Luka writes in "Thoughts On ..." that he wrote a letter to Harry Lorayne about the cover item, stating that he didn't agree that the item was the "best" lie detector. Obviously, by the tone of the writing, John Luka was not being antagonistic, and even Harry Lorayne admitted in his write up of the Marty Kane routine that he was not a big fan of these types of routines but that of the ones he had liked, the Kane routine was the best one. [Check out Harry Lorayne's own Spel[l]Egant in a lter (1997) issue of Apocalypse for a really sweet lie detector that in my opinion is FAR more direct than the Kane version].

Basically, the comparison to be made here is in terms of method and overall effect. While both the Bauer and Kane routines are easy in terms of skill, there is MUCH less work in the Ron Bauer routine, which, remember, predates Marty Kane's routine by some thirty years. Ron Bauer's routine also ups the ante (Thanks captainsmiffy) in that the performer clearly states that the final card IS the selection but that he is going to check the facts from the other packets. In both routines as in all lie detectors, the spectators is told she can lie or tell the truth. In Ron Bauer's routine, those packets (two of them remaining) actually serve a purpose and provide the penultimate climax.

The control of the card in the Bauer version is in John Luka's words "straight forward with no need for **** ***f****." There are some other things going on in the Kane routine that some may find superfluous. I am not offering an opinion here. Rather, this post is for those who have the publications to compare. It would be a blast to get your thoughts.

What I wanted to touch on briefly is Ron Bauer's presentation of this routine. In a word, it is everything you would want. As I mentioned previously, Ron Bauer's Private Studies booklets are mini-courses in magic and presentation. John Luka wrote in this column that [at the time] Ron Bauer usually only included a generic presentation to guide the learner. In this routine, we get Ron Bauer's complete presentation. It's beautiful and worth studying as you get the "why" with the how.

I like lie detector routines because I believe they are intrinsically entertaining. You don't need to stick to formulaic questions and even if you want to, there is still a lot of room for some interesting spectator interaction. Moreover, lie detector routines play beautifully into the cat and mouse game that magicians and spectators play; the spectator has every opportunity - so she thinks - to trip up the performer and I lie that. While I try to avoid tricks and routines that "sting" the spectator, I DO love tricks and routines that lead them down the garden path and giving THEM the illusion of control then lovingly whacking them with my ever trusty metaphorical Louisville Slugger.

Even if you don't have access to these specific routines, I urge you to find one in your working library and perform it. While these routines may lack the visual bling, they are presentational playgrounds." Smile

Best,
Vlad

PS: I wanted to mention that I ama HUGE fan of John Guastaferro's book One Degree. This book has garnered wonderful praise and deservedly so. I would bet however that newcomers to the art are more familiar with John Guastaferro's work than that of Ron Bauer. Whether or not John Guastaferro is aware of it - I think he is - in my opinion, he is firmly entrenched in the Ron Bauer school of getting "more" out of a trick and/or routine. So, if you're a fan of Mr. Guastaferro, you'll love Ron Bauer's work. Disclaimer: I do not know Ron Bauer and I have never had the honor of meeting him or seeing him perform so I have nothing to gain by praising his work. That said, others here such as Cameron Roat and of course John Luka know Mr. Bauer and I am sure they would be happy to acquaint you with the work of this great magician.
pjpastir
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Hi David,
"Remote Control"
Theodore Annemann
Encyclopedia of Card Tricks pg. 121
Skill Level-Beginner

I have the Kindle version so there are no page numbers. Could you tell me what "Chapter" this is found?

Thanks
Paul
Atom3339
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Paul, You can probably do a Search on Kindle.
TH

Occupy Your Dream
pjpastir
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Hi Atom3339,

How do I that. My Kindle is about 3 yrs old and only lists the chapters of the contexts?

Thanks
Paul
pjpastir
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Correction
How do I do that

Thanks
Paul
pjpastir
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How do I that. My Kindle is about 3 yrs old and only lists the chapters of the contents?
Kabbalah
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Quote:
On Nov 22, 2014, Vlad_77 wrote:

The "Best" Lie Detector as unofficially titled by John Luka and routined by Ron Bauer
presented in a column by John Luka in The New TOPS
v.33, n.10, October 1993, pp. 6-10.

NOTE: The New TOPS is available digitally from The Conjuring Arts Research Center as well as Todd Karr's Miracle Factory unless of course you are Byron Walker, Denny Haney, or Jon Greget in which case you have a complete paper run. (I wager my friend Etienne has a complete paper run as well. I am a pauper so my copy is digital).



This is also published in John Luka's L.I.N.T. ~ Pocket Stuff for Close-Up Magicians, pp. 1-8.
"Long may magicians fascinate and continue to be fascinated by the mystery potential in a pack of cards."
~Cliff Green

"The greatest tricks ever performed are not done at all. The audience simply think they see them."
~ John Northern Hilliard
Vlad_77
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Quote:
On Nov 23, 2014, Kabbalah wrote:
Quote:
On Nov 22, 2014, Vlad_77 wrote:

The "Best" Lie Detector as unofficially titled by John Luka and routined by Ron Bauer
presented in a column by John Luka in The New TOPS
v.33, n.10, October 1993, pp. 6-10.

NOTE: The New TOPS is available digitally from The Conjuring Arts Research Center as well as Todd Karr's Miracle Factory unless of course you are Byron Walker, Denny Haney, or Jon Greget in which case you have a complete paper run. (I wager my friend Etienne has a complete paper run as well. I am a pauper so my copy is digital).



This is also published in John Luka's L.I.N.T. ~ Pocket Stuff for Close-Up Magicians, pp. 1-8.



Thanks for that Kabbalah and it proves that some us - it seems me in this case - don't know their own libraries. I have John Luka's L.I.N.T. and stupidly didn't think to check it. Smile
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