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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Everything old is new again » » Chink-a-Chink - Malini's performance (1 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

Wayne Roberts
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I'm doing some research and need help pertaining to several sources.

1.
It is said that Malini performed “Chink-a-Chink” with 3 + 1 sugar lumps. In Sphinx (vol. 36 no. 10, 1939) Horowitz describes that Malini used 4+1 sugar lumps, as Horowitz did himself. I have not found a source to prove that Malini used 3+1 objects yet. Is there any?

2.
Horowitz pictured Malini's routine as a travelling of objects from one hand to the other, as it is done in coins-across routines. In this case Malini's version of “Chink-a-Chink” would be different to the versions associated with “Chink-a-Chink”, where the performer's hands were only used to cover the objects. Besides Horowitz' article is there any other source to fortify this assumption?

Thanks for your support!
Jeff Hinchliffe
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Off the top of my head, you can check the Malini book and Stars of Magic (with the Malini-Bey Chink a Chink). Or, you can try and contact Johnny Thompson. Thompson spent many years under the tutelage of Charlie Miller, who spent time with Malini, so he could likely shed some light on your questions.

Good Luck.
Pick a card, any card...
TKF
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In Stars of Magic, Horowitz and the description say it is 4 plus 1 dominoes...

But however, they do mention use of 3 or 4 cubes of sugar in your packet for at the end when a switch to sugar occurs to go with the patter involved.

I would be interested in seeing some 3 item matrix routines!
RS1963
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If you have the Skinner Tapes that were released by Richard Kaufman last year. Malini's exact lay out pattern for Chink A Chink is described and also a pdf is provided of the lay out also.
Wayne Roberts
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Quote:
On Feb 26, 2015, TKF wrote:
In Stars of Magic, Horowitz and the description say it is 4 plus 1 dominoes...

But however, they do mention use of 3 or 4 cubes of sugar in your packet for at the end when a switch to sugar occurs to go with the patter involved.

I would be interested in seeing some 3 item matrix routines!


Yep. But the description found in "Stars of Magic" is based on Horowitz earlier publication.
Wayne Roberts
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Quote:
On May 11, 2015, RS1963 wrote:
If you have the Skinner Tapes that were released by Richard Kaufman last year. Malini's exact lay out pattern for Chink A Chink is described and also a pdf is provided of the lay out also.


Thank you. That's an interesting reference. I will check that out. I guess that certain letter to Allan Okawa could be an useful source.
Richard Kaufman
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You can get the Skinner set of 13 discs for only $25 by subscribing to Genii. Smile
Wayne Roberts
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On May 13, 2015, Richard Kaufman wrote:
You can get the Skinner set of 13 discs for only $25 by subscribing to Genii. Smile


Hello Richard,
well thank's, but too late. I am a Genii subscriber, already! But maybe I'll file my essay on the development of this kind of routines, when I've finished it. Smile
Wayne Roberts
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So, I think I've got my answers. Jeff Hinchliff introduced the Malini-Miller-Thompson-connection. I did some research there and found Thompson's publication "Polished Polish Prestidigitation" from 1981. Thompson describes the original routine and his alterations. Now I've learned that Malini would use 4 plus 1 sugar lumps. At the beginning of the routine he tossed the lumps between his hands showing always 4 lumps in one hand. This should expound Horowitz' description. For the tossing move is done in coins-accross.

Thanks a bunch, folks!
Antony Gerard
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Hello Wayne

If you like Chink-A-Chink, here is some information from some of my effects and books.

History: The Coins Across and Chink-A-Chink have been among my favorite routines since 1969. However, the original beginnings of the effect that we now know as Chink-A-Chink, dates back long before I started performing it. It was Sean McWeeney who brought to light the fact that the effect Chink-A-Chink, is a lot older than was previously thought. In fact, it has a history dating back to the early to middle 1800’s. Plus, in 1877, Edwin Sach’s published his variation of the effect in his book, “Sleight of Hand”. In his book, Edwin Sach’s used four sugar cubes for his Chink-A-Chink like routine. It was Hank Yoe who is reputed to have performed a Chink-A-Chink like routine with coins sometime in the late 1800’s to early 1900’s, and introduced the name Sympathetic Coins to the effect and to the magic community.

It was Max Malini, who popularized the effect in the early 1900’s. Malini used cut-down wine corks and is generally credited with naming the effect “Chink-A-Chink”. Later, Leo Horowitz took Malini's version, added changes of his own, and used covered sugar cubes. Many years later, Canadian magician Doug Henning, again modified the effect and performed Chink-A-Chink on television. Doug used seashells in his routine. Plus, Dutch magicians Fred Kaps and Tommy Wonder also performed and modified Chink-A-Chink to suit their own styles.

For many years, pre-fabricated Chink-A-Chink sets have been made available to the magic community. Besides myself (Antony Gerard), Auke van Dokkum of the Netherlands, François Danis of France, and Jim Riser of the United States have manufactured and supplied a variety of Chink-A-Chink sets. However, the trend over the past twenty years, has been towards justifiable items, instead of the metal towers that resemble nothing found in everyday life. Items like bottle caps, wine corks, dice, brass weights, coins, my miniature top hats, and my Ice Cubes are finding themselves being used instead of the artificial ones.

I first started manufacturing my resin Ice Cubes in 2003 and used them in my spilled cola glass joke. I did not start using them in my Ice Cubes Across routine until 2011. My Ice Cubes Across routine was inspired by my Coins Across routine that in turn was inspired by the “Four Coins to a Glass” routine as may be found on page #160 through page #164 in Modern Coin Magic by J. B. Bobo (1952).

Whenever I come up with a new routine, effect, prop, or idea, I also try to find other, nonstandard uses for it as was the case with my resin Ice Cubes. However, it took me over eight years to come up with an idea for them that did not entail one of my spill products. The thing that I like most about the Ice Cubes Across routine is, the fact that the performer is able to palm the Ice Cube from the table without touching the table much like the Chink-A-Chink metal towers. The Ice Cubes are about one inch tall and thus are able to be palmed while the performer’s hand is about an inch from the table top.

Ice Cubes Across is not the first routine that I came up with where the item to be palmed is palmed with the palming hand about an inch from the table top. In 1976, I created a routine that I titled, “Hippity Hop Hats”. It was a routine that employed miniature top hats in my “Coins Across” inspired routine. At the end of my “Hippity Hop Hats” routine, and as a segue into my Sponge Rabbit’s routine, I would pull a sponge rabbit out of one of the Top Hats. My Ice Cubes Across routine is nearly the same as Hippity Hop Hats, except Ice Cubes are used.

After performing my Ice Cubes Across routine, and after I dropped the Ice Cubes back into my glass, I would notice a water spill on the spot where I had dropped the Ice Cubes. Next, I would cover the spill with two playing cards, pick up the playing cards, and show that the water has vanished. The principle that I employed is, Jerry Andrus’ “Misers Miracle”. I.e.; The water spill was hidden behind the playing cards that I had picked up and shown fronts and backs to the spectators. Incidentally, the fake water spill is another one of my creations and is supplied with my Ice Cubes Across effect and routine. Garrett Thomas suggested using a napkin to cover the water spill, then tear the napkin open and find a fifth ice cube. The method that I now perform is, I cover the water spill with my hands and when I remove my hands, the water spill is gone and in its place is the fifth ice cube.

I also used to perform a Chink-A-Chink routine with a selected playing card. I would have a card selected, tear the card into quarters, fold the quarters into little tents cards (A-Frame's), and perform my Chink-A-Chink routine with the four tent cards. At the end of the routine, the fourth tent piece refuses to join the other three. At that time I hand the fourth piece to a spectator. Next, I pick up the three tent card pieces and unfold them. The three pieces have been restored and the fourth piece, that the spectator has, fits perfectly. I first started performing the "Tent cards" routine in 1978, however, I did not put this routine in print until 1982. The "Tent Cards" may be found in my book "Last Call" (1982 - Pages #53 through #56)

Johnny Thompson also has some ideas in his booklet "Polished Polish Prestidigitation" (1981)
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