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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Shuffled not Stirred » » The Memory Arts by David Trustman and Sarah Trustman [Tamariz's Mnemonica] (72 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Nathan Alexander
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How hard would it be to apply this to aronson? Are the methods transferable? Or would they require a lot more work to translate?
GReaper
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Yeah this would work fine; you'll learn how to apply the method to Tamariz specifically but you could easily create your own images to learn Aronson if you wanted. The method's designed to be applied to any stack or sequence of cards.
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sjrw
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Quote:
On Aug 3, 2016, casinoboss wrote:
Does anyone know if there are any differences between the eBook version and the physical one offered on Amazon?



I think the physical one teaches you the memory techniques, and how to memorise a deck of cards... but I believe it does not have the sprecific section on how to memorise Mnemonica.
Jerry
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The E-Book is 100 pages in length.

Chap:
Intro – History, source and inspiration for the system.

1 The Card Key - System for remembering cards (IE face for ace and hen for ten).

2 The Memory Path - System for remembering location (IE tower for one and owl tree for ten).

3 Advance memory structure and mapping – Something I never knew about or came across in the memory books I have read, The Feinaiglian Grid. Advance location system.

4 Combining the stack - The system for remembering card pips and the location of images within the grid. Combing card key and memory path. Note: This listed in the wrong order in the table of contents, but is in the actual sequence in the book.

5 Shopping list - no comment
6 First conversation - no comment
7 Closing thoughts - no comment

Over all, with a few acceptions there is no new dramatic techniques here. I can only recommend it to someone who has no other memory systems or books. Or they have tried other systems and had difficulty or did not like them.
Can not see why this system could not be adapted to other card system. I changed the locations (IE Costa Rica mystery spheres instead of the snowman) as this made more sense to me.
Hope this added some more detail to help you with your purchase decision.
larotule
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Quote:
Hope this added some more detail to help you with your purchase decision.


Yes !!! thanks ! (that's too expensive for a memory system) - a double pao on memory forum are given for free (techniques used by memory "jedis"... just in case the world record of learning a borrowed deck is 18.653 seconds with a double pao)

according to your comment cards system seems to be only a "p or o" so no new things here.

Seems working for stack(s) but for the real memory works nothing new...

so thx again for your review
pnielan
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Memorizing a deck in a short time as in memory contests and learning a memorized deck for general conjuring purposes are two very different things. If you know a memdeck well enough to perform good magic with it, whatever memory techniques (including mnemonics or Tamariz type pictures) you used to first learn have long dropped away (or at least you don't use them). I can memorize a deck using PAO type approaches in about 90 seconds (far off the record), but have spent 200+ hours getting facile with a memdeck.

I could not perform most memdeck tricks with a random order I just memorized.

Here's a test: shuffle a deck, then try to separate the cards into 2 piles (1-26 stack numbers in one pile and 27-52 stack numbers in another). If that takes more than a minute (and it will if you need PAO or any mnemonic link to link card to number), then (in my opinion), you don't know your stack cold.

Here's another test, shuffle a deck and try to put in 1-52 order according to your stack. If that takes more than 2 (maybe 3) minutes, you don't know your stack cold.

So three levels: (1) don't know the stack, (2) without a written crib, you know card-to-number and vice versa, but you need mnemonics, (3) your associations have dropped away (or remain in reserve) and you know your stack cold.
shakuni
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Are there plans to release a print version of this book? Thanks.
Tom G
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I believe Amazon has the print version, little more in price than the ebook.
shakuni
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Amazon version is a general version. Ebook is Tamariz stack specific. Went with the ebook. Thanks.
RJLockwood
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The book adds structure to a mental mapping system that usually you have to create yourself, Now they do that for you. A good number of memdeck effects are achievable within just a few days of reading the book. Highly Reccomend for those interested in learning the stack.
Me personally, I memorized the Aronson stack hardcore in a few days, and the Mnemonica stack with this book... I personally would go for the hardcore route if I were you... Not everyone will want that though and this book is BEYOND GREAT if you want an easy way to go. Smile

If you cant do either method download the app for Iphone "Ultimate Aronson/Mnemonica Stack Trainer", its fun, and teaches you the RIGHT WAY for instant recall of whatever info you need. If you work a little daily on that app for a month or so you will be set for LIFE.

Thanks, Ryan Lockwood
The more I learn, the less I seem to know.
pierredan
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I believe there may be a misprint. The memory path number 7 depicts a giraff but it's neck is facing the wrong way. It looks like a reverse 7, the image is not consistent with the others.

If this is a mistake, I wish it gets corrected before I lock it into my memory and start combining the key with the path.
pierredan
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Correction: There is no misprint. The "7" is there, I just didn't see it.
RJLockwood
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Quote:
On Sep 24, 2016, pierredan wrote:
Correction: There is no misprint. The "7" is there, I just didn't see it.


This got me to for the longest time
Smile
The more I learn, the less I seem to know.
andre.eighty
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Does the Amazon version show locations 27-50? When will Book B be release?
Nathan Horne
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So if I understand this correctly, the book only teaches you half of the stack and only contains 26 images?
Kjellstrom
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pierredan
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Quote:
On Nov 19, 2016, Nathan Horne wrote:
So if I understand this correctly, the book only teaches you half of the stack and only contains 26 images?


The book provides 26 images corresponding to 26 numbers. A second book is planned and it is expected to provide images 27 to 50 (why not 52, I have no clue).

The system works very well and the images artistically represents the number.

The big problem with the current release is that you have to link two cards to one number and then divide by 2. Why not provide 52 images.

Although this will work if you put in the effort, it makes no sense to me that one would have to do the additional step of some math when you could easily link on card to one image.
I believe they may re-release this system when the other images are ready and book B is released.
boinko
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No need for locations 27 through 50 for a deck of cards.

You put two images on each location. Much faster that way, btw. One card is in the foreground, the other in the background. And because the cards are in spatial quadrants -- the suit is automatically a part of the image. (In other words, no need to picture a number and suit. For example, I used to see the two of hearts as 'B' and 'H' ('B' as 2, 'H' as 'H' -- so in my old system, 2H = 'Boss Hogg' -- a word starting with 'B' and a word starting with 'H'). Here, you only need an image for the 2 and then a spatial quadrant to place the image in your location. It sounds complicated, but once you see the explanation here, you realize how quickly it clicks.

I bought both books -- the Tamariz and the Aronson -- and they're superb. Absolutely superb.

I've already memorized my stacks with the Dominic system -- but if I'd had these books, I would have -- literally -- been able to memorize both stacks within a week. The artwork here is the key -- vivid, suggestive, and (exactly the point) memorable.

If you've ever wanted to learn a stack -- or, better yet, learn to memorize a randomly shuffled deck of cards -- these are the books. These are fantastic. I can't recommend these enough.
boinko
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Quote:
On Nov 21, 2016, pierredan wrote:


The big problem with the current release is that you have to link two cards to one number and then divide by 2. Why not provide 52 images.



This is not a problem. This is the point. It's *much* faster. The 26 locations are a feature -- not a bug.

Why only put a single image in an entire location? Why not use the tactile memory texture of their locations (or your own) to leverage two cards? If you image a tower in a field, for example (their number one location) why not leverage the sky, the field, the foreground, and the background. In fact, they leverage quadrants for the suits -- two in the top of the image (sky for the tower), two in the bottom (grassy field). Put one (card) image in the foreground, one in the background.

Remember, too, that you're not linking two cards to one *number*. You're linking two cards to one *location* which has Tamariz's number automatically a part of it. The tower is number one, because it looks like number one. It's already there -- and you're seeing it as part of the image. So the idea is to force your mind to consciously think of images which subconsciously -- or less consciously -- supply the number (and the card values and suits). The "magic" here is how the imagery supplies the answer -- not necessarily the forced translation to the (to the mind, at least) less mundane "position in the stack, card value, and card suit".

The less you think of the mundane stuff, the more powerful this method becomes. Let the mundane stuff happen through the imagery! Smile It's a kind of (computer science) transclusion for stack location through image embedding.
boinko
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Quote:
On Nov 19, 2016, Nathan Horne wrote:
So if I understand this correctly, the book only teaches you half of the stack and only contains 26 images?



Incorrect. Everything you need to know for the entire Tamariz stack is here. You put two images in each location. 26 * 2 = 52.
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