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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Marion Boykin New Routine (41 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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evikshin
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Check out this smooth transposition routine from the one and only, smooth stylings, of Marion!
Don't you love that finger palm? No stiff, guilty fingers here, check out the coin changes too, pure eye candy!
Enjoy

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFk5PcrIwdc&feature=youtu.be
warren
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Marion is a smooth operator for sure Smile
pabloinus
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Very nice, very entertaining
Al Schneider
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What do you think of this version of copper silver transposition?

https://youtu.be/NL_isdqiF0A
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
pabloinus
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Al, yours is also very nice and entertaining but requires another elements besides the hands. Not the same trick
warren
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Al very nice but what 's nice about about Marions routine is that its all in the hands no table required making it versatile.
Al Schneider
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Well, how about this routine.
The table is not needed.
Instead of using the table I normally have the spec hold the coins in the beginning.
If you think that is a cop out, vinny uses a table all the time but says he doesn't need a table.
Is he wrong?

Anyway, here it is:

https://youtu.be/bmtwaW_CpOo
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
evikshin
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Hi Al

Thanks for sharing. What do I think about it? I think the routine is excellent and is definitely a fooler. Movements are economical and classic. The cone introduces an extra element which makes it impossible for any spectator to backtrack the element, IMHO.

I know you're not asking me to compare, but I will for the sake of discussion: I think this routine is ideal in a parlor setting, perhaps if performing at a semi-formal environment. Whereas Marion's is ideal for walk-around or strolling (off the cuff performances). Also, Marion's involves direct visual changes, whereas your's involves indirect changes (the changes are not witnessed directly, but happen under cover). As for which is better, can't say, it's like apples and oranges. It would be like comparing visual 3-Fly to Close Fisted coins across. Both register somewhat differently with the spectators, and both have their ideal performing environments.
fonda57
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Https://youtu.be/Au2gNnZO-yc

He does one on this show.
terryisaacs
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Evikshin, MB has a sweet touch no doubt, really enjoyed this video a lot.

AL Schneider, my wife recently bought me a used copy of AL schneider Magic and I'm super excited to read it. That being said those two videos you linked to were awesome!
"What we do in life echoes in eternity"
Al Schneider
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Evikshin
Are you nuts. This routine was designed for walk-around or strolling (off the cuff performances). Ya got two coins in your pocket and you can do it while waiting for a movie. And you say it is not visual. I have said that magic is in the spectator's mind. The wizard's of smart seem to agree with that. Why does it make a difference here? Not only that, do you really believe that when MB waves his hand in the air and switches coins the audience doesn't belive he just switched the coins. I agree that his move requires intense skill and he does it very well. But its like doing a perfect vanish and the audience simply says its in the other hand. It is also like showing a curled up hand and producing a coin at the finger tips. Do you really believe that lay audiences don't realize the coin came from someplace hidden in the hand. They say, "Oh my, how can he hide a coin that way." Doesn't sound like magic to me.

OK your turn.
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
Al Schneider
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Evikshin
Oops
I thought you were talking about the routine with the lady. I did not realize you were talking about the cone trick. You are correct, that is intended for a more formal setting.

terryisaacs
Thanks. I think those two routines are in that book. Not sure, a lot of time has passed.
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
fonda57
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I need to find someone to buy me that Al Schneider book. Most of my money goes to doctor bills.
evikshin
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No problem Al, I thought I made relatively benign comments, so I was somewhat suprised by your response. Thanks for the clarification. It's still a great routine and one I think many would benefit from studying, as it appears there's a lot of magic concepts coalescing in that one routine.

Thanks
cperkins
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To this point, there are six people in on this conversation.

Can you tell me which one acts most like an eight year old?
To see a difficult thing lightly handled gives the impression of the impossible.
(Goethe)
Al Schneider
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Cperkins
And you are the first one to make a personal attack.
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
countrymaven
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To all coin workers: we all must pay attention to Mr. Schneider.

You can be so caught up in performing magic, that without KNOWING IT, the spectators might be more amazed with your skill than your magic. That is a real problem.
That has led me to develop cleaner versions of my magic. A good help for this is TO LISTEN to your worst, smartest viewers. they will tell you what they think or will guess what happened.
If you work hard enough on your methods to leave them no reasonable explanation, it is easier to present your work as magic rather than a trick.

Recently, I heard some people at work talking about my magic with some gasps and total cluelessness. like they had seen a witch doctor. that is when I realized that attention to methods, subtlety and presentation are finally starting to pay off. hehe. I have not arrived, but am getting closer due to paying attention to listening to my spectators to see if they are being puzzled or if they are seeing magic. It is a huge difference.
and they enjoy magic much more than puzzles.
warren
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Quote:
On Feb 18, 2017, Al Schneider wrote:
Well, how about this routine.
The table is not needed.
Instead of using the table I normally have the spec hold the coins in the beginning.
If you think that is a cop out, vinny uses a table all the time but says he doesn't need a table.
Is he wrong?

Anyway, here it is:

https://youtu.be/bmtwaW_CpOo


Thanks for Sharing Al very nice as was the first routine Smile
Al Schneider
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Countrymaven
Man, you are right on.
I believe you cannot look at the spectator at the moment the magic is revealed. Look at some of the videos posted by the great ones in this forum. They are looking right at the customer at the moment of magic. And when someone is staring at you, you do not care about the magic and you are not looking at the magic. Thus, I cannot see my audience at the time I want to see how they react. So, I will have someone sit in an advantageous place and observe for me. Later, I talk to them and find out what is going on. I believe a magician must understand what is going through the observer's head to know how to make a performance better. At one time I lived in apartments that had elaborate party rooms. For awhile I had two parties a month. I got some magicians from the local club to do magic at these parties. I varied things and tested approaches to see what worked best. I learned a great deal about magic logistics and how other performers behaved. I learned two things. Never surprise a group with a magic show. The other is to get the audience to change area to see a magic show. There are, of course, times when these are not possible. I once gave some advice on this forum to do a trick many times assuming the first ten or so would fail or go wrong somehow. Those are the times you pay attention to the audience and use their reactions to alter the trick you are doing.

Thank you for your post countrymaven. It made my day.
Magic Al. Say it fast and it is magical.
cperkins
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Hey, you are really drilling down to it, countrymaven....listening to your audience to take criticism but learning their perceptions of you and your magic.

Great stuff...keep us posted.
To see a difficult thing lightly handled gives the impression of the impossible.
(Goethe)
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