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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » The workers » » Book recommendations other than H.L.? (25 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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corpmagi
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Some names worth mentioning; Bannon, Carney, Aragón, Aronson, Giobbi, Racherbaumer, Reynolds, RP Wilson, Vernon
A Modern Trade Show Handbook
www.trafficstoppers.com/handbook
Ricardo Delgado
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Many of you listed a LOT of books. And that is great, really. But I vaguely remember of similar topics, with similar answers. What if we could take it up a notch?

As some have said, there are too many to list.

Why not, then, list fewer books but add your thoughts about each book? Which book would you consider worth of writing a little paragraph about why you think it's a recommended book?

I know it's a bit boring, but I think posts like this could add more value than just listing authors and titles ("Ascanio, Tamariz, Berglas, Kauffman, Marlo, Vernon, Giobbi ..." or "RRTCM, ECT, Inner Secrets...")

I'll start:

I believe these weren't posted on this thread yet:


The Secrets of So Sato, by Richard Kauffman and So Sato

I think it's a very good book. Maybe more suited to the "intermediary" level. There are some sleight of hand (one of the most interesting uses for Lennart Green's snap deal), some killer "selfworking" effects, and some great principles, that maybe could aid even the mem-deck enthusiasts. He's got a nice different way of thinking, and I always find that really interesting. And, magic slap is my new favorite way of "revealing" a card (basically you clap your hands and a card appears in between them).


Sonata, by Juan Tamariz

I really like that book. There are some good techniques, good effects (Double Ambicious Cards, Hypnotic Jokers, The Talisman,...) as well as one of may favorite (and one of the most difficult) selfworking effects: Total Coincidence. I don't think it's suited to the complete beginner though. It took a while for me to start using and appreciating what is in there.


Libertad de Expresion, by Dani Daortiz

A book on forcing. Incredible. It took my classic forcing (which was mediocre to horrible) to a whole new level, for instance. It was the one which I started understanding how to deal with spectators, how to evaluate the timming of things, and the one where I learned the possibility to work with two realities and manipulate memories (maybe it sounds bigger than it really is, but it's a method to, among other things, force a thought card). I don't know if it was translated to English, but some of it is in the Utopia set of DVDs.
Roger Kelly
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The Dave Campbell Legacy and Dear Mr Fantasy are two of my faves.
slowdini
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Ascanio.
slowdini
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Forces Unseen =$3214 on amazon
Drawing Room Deceptions =$1790 on amazon.
My copies of these are for sale at discounted prices:
Forces Unseen $3199
Drawing Room Deceptions $1699.
😉
magicfish
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, slowdini wrote:
Forces Unseen =$3214 on amazon
Drawing Room Deceptions =$1790 on amazon.
My copies of these are for sale at discounted prices:
Forces Unseen $3199
Drawing Room Deceptions $1699.
😉

Good deals. Why the wink? Do these offers stand?
Rupert Pupkin
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In what we world are these good deals? Both books can be purchased for under $75 in most instances.
magicfish
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Then buy them. I'd be happy to discuss their contents with you.
magicfish
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I can easily spend $1800 dollars on a barbeque, a busted ATV, an as is parts car, etc. DO you really think these items are more valuable than life changing magic secrets that can earn you an indeterminate amount of money or more importantly, lifetime respect as an excellent practitioner?
Magic secrets are important. As a magician, there is nothing more important.
I spent $5000 dollars on a trip to Mexico.
Was it better than a Stephen Munch book?
Not even CLOSE!
Tim Cavendish
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Evidently magicfish even wants to keep the author's name a secret too.

Tricksy misdirection there...

Shhh! The nasty Googlers will never know the secretses!
magicfish
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, Tim Cavendish wrote:
Evidently magicfish even wants to keep the author's name a secret too.

Tricksy misdirection there...

Shhh! The nasty Googlers will never know the secretses!

Gosh you're a good texter.
My thumb misses the mark sometimes. But you're as sharp as ever Tit.
Tim Cavendish
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, magicfish wrote:
I can easily spend $1800 dollars on a barbeque, a busted ATV, an as is parts car, etc. DO you really think these items are more valuable than life changing magic secrets that can earn you an indeterminate amount of money or more importantly, lifetime respect as an excellent practitioner?


Lifetime respect as an excellent performer does not come from magic secrets. It comes primarily from being a performer who connects compellingly with one's audience. Magic is just the window dressing on that.

Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, magicfish wrote:
Magic secrets are important. As a magician, there is nothing more important.


You've read Jim Steinmeyer's Hiding The Elephant, right?
MasterGrip
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, magicfish wrote:
I can easily spend $1800 dollars on a barbeque, a busted ATV, an as is parts car, etc. DO you really think these items are more valuable than life changing magic secrets that can earn you an indeterminate amount of money or more importantly, lifetime respect as an excellent practitioner?
Magic secrets are important. As a magician, there is nothing more important.
I spent $5000 dollars on a trip to Mexico.
Was it better than a Stephen Munch book?
Not even CLOSE!


How do you not realize you're THAT guy?
magicfish
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Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, Tim Cavendish wrote:
Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, magicfish wrote:
I can easily spend $1800 dollars on a barbeque, a busted ATV, an as is parts car, etc. DO you really think these items are more valuable than life changing magic secrets that can earn you an indeterminate amount of money or more importantly, lifetime respect as an excellent practitioner?


Lifetime respect as an excellent performer does not come from magic secrets. It comes primarily from being a performer who connects compellingly with one's audience. Magic is just the window dressing on that.

Quote:
On Jan 2, 2018, magicfish wrote:
Magic secrets are important. As a magician, there is nothing more important.


You've read Jim Steinmeyer's Hiding The Elephant, right?

I agree.
SleightlyChris
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Let's put a few books out there that aren't as widely read.

Steranko on Cards
Bro John Hamman
Drawing room Deception

Steranko his thinking is so out of the box it's a wonderful new view.

John Hamman is Final Aces routine as long as his work on a double lift from a pack of 5 is great.

Guy hollingworth is a genius when it comes to motivated actions along with effects with cards that doesn't utilize just your two hands but a number of different things. Look at his handling of waving the aces and his 4 card to pocket routine. Fantastic.
foolsnobody
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Someone mentioned the Hierophant but no one mentioned *Marlo* in this thread? I don't believe it; I better check again. Smile

Some other unmentioned books that strongly influenced me. Or meant a lot to me:

The Bert Allerton pamphlet by Robert Parrish
The Magic of Matt Schulien
Magician Nitely (Fechter) (I never saw the book "Fechter" that came later)
The Magic of Francis Carlyle (the book was a mess but the subject matter was precious)
Other people mentioned them, but I also spent a lot of time with Variations (Nelson) and The Card Magic of LePaul.

No mention of Marlo. <shaking head> Sad.
mlippo
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To the various great names already cited, I would add Michael CLose. Great thinking ...

Mark
Tom G
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Another name I didn't see mentioned is J. C. Wagner, some great card stuff in his books.
magicfish
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Amen to that.
landmark
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Barrie Richardson's three books, Theater of the Mind, Act Two, and Curtain Call are not unpopular, but perhaps not so much on the radar of strictly card guys.

While most of the effects are generally mental magic oriented, there is some excellent, excellent card material in these, and all with intriguing premises and scripts.
"Don't believe everything you read on the Internet"--Abraham Lincoln

You can read my daily blog at Musings, Memories, and Magic
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