The Magic Café
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » History and Science: The Terminator is back (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7~8~9~10~11~12 [Next]
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: The sniffer. A program and/or device that monitors data traveling over a network. Sniffers can be used both for legitimate network management functions and for stealing information off a network. Unauthorized sniffers can be extremely dangerous to a network's security because they are virtually impossible to detect and can be inserted almost anywhere. This makes them a favorite weapon in the hacker's arsenal.
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Find with google: Why the 2017 fire season is shaping up to be one of California's worst
Notice: Largest rainfall and hottest dry summer
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: Hacking Self-Driving Cars
While automakers focus on defending the systems in their cars against hackers, there may be other ways for the malicious to mess with self-driving cars. Security researchers at the University of Washington have shown they can get computer vision systems to misidentify road signs using nothing more than stickers made on a home printer. UW computer-security researcher Yoshi Kohno described an attack algorithm that uses printed images stuck on road signs. These images confuse the cameras on which most self-driving vehicles rely. In one example, explained in a document uploaded to the open-source scientific-paper site arXiv last week, small stickers attached to a standard stop sign caused a vision system to misidentify it as a Speed Limit 45 sign. The vision systems in autonomous cars typically have an object detector and a classifier: the former spots pedestrians, lights, signs, and other vehicles, and the latter decides what the object is and what the signs are saying. The attacks Kohno described assume that hackers are able to gain access to this classifier and then, using its algorithm and a photo of the target road sign, generate a customized image. The attack relies on the vulnerability of deep neural networks that have been trained to recognize signs, stoplights, and other road users using images from cameras mounted on self-driving vehicles. These systems can be sensitive to malicious perturbations—small, precisely crafted changes to their inputs—that can cause them to misbehave in unexpected and potentially dangerous ways. Researchers have long known that tinkering with what a computer sees can lead to incorrect results. But previous attacks involved changes that were either too extreme—and thus obvious to human drivers—or too subtle, only working from a particular angle or at a certain distance.
Jonathan Townsend
View Profile
Eternal Order
Ossining, NY
26709 Posts

Profile of Jonathan Townsend
Those trolley stories kinda ignore big data. Recall the last fifteen minutes of the movie THX1138. Why did the police turn back? (cough), (cough) return value computations Smile Smile (cough)
...to all the coins I've dropped here
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: The Hacking of Sonic http://fortune.com/2017/09/27/sonic-stoc......-breach/
Introducing: 7 Years of Catastropic Data Breaches 27 May 2014
http://info.rippleshot.com/blog/7-years-......breaches
Introducing: 2017 Data Breaches-The Worst So Far
https://www.identityforce.com/blog/2017-data-breaches
Introducing: Equifax-Hacked
http://mashable.com/2017/09/07/cybersecu......ln.4TkqM
Introducing: Equifax https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equifax
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Expert professional skilled safe crackers know there is no safe that cannot be opened.
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
It is likely that since humanity may learn from its mistakes the discovery and knowledge of past
thoughts and events as best as they can be imagined, remembered, recorded and preserved has been thought to be of value to the next generation.
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Intoducing: Dave Chappelle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Chappelle
In his Killing Them Softly Routine, 2000. Chappelle stated, "If a woman dresses like a wh*** she will be mistaken for a wh***. If I dress like a policeman I will be mistaken for a policeman."
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: The Heartland Instistute https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Heartland_Institute
Introducing: S. Fred Singer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fred_Singer
Hot Talk, Cold Science: Global Warming's Unfinished Debate by S. Fred Singer

Introducing: Various Reviews of Hot Talk, Cold Science
http://www.worldclimatereport.com/archiv......ocus.htm
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/741228/posts

Introducing: Unstoppable Global Warming: Every 1,500 Years by S. Fred Singer and Dennis T. Avery
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unstoppabl......00_Years
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: Mike Hulme https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Hulme
Introducing: Why We Disagree About Climate Change: Understanding, Controversy, Inaction and Opportunity
by Mike Hulme https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Why_We_Dis......e_Change

Introducing: Naomi Oreskes https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naomi_Oreskes
Introducing: Erik M. Conway https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erik_M._Conway

Introducing: Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues of
Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchants_of_Doubt

Introducing: The George C. Marshall Institute https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_C._Marshall_Institute
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: Merchants of Doubt (Film) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merchants_of_Doubt_(film)

Note: Using a professional magician, the film explores the analogy between these tactics and the methods used by magicians to distract their audiences from observing how illusions are performed.
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: ExxonMobil https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ExxonMobil
Introducing: Rex Tillerson https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Tillerson
On December 13, 2016, the CEO of ExxonMobil, Rex Tillerson, was nominated as Secretary of State by President-elect Donald Trump
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: Wernher Von Braun https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wernher_von_Braun
Introducing: Ernst Heinkel https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Heinkel
Dannydoyle
View Profile
Eternal Order
18864 Posts

Profile of Dannydoyle
My lord this is just amazing.
Danny Doyle
<BR>Semper Occultus
<BR>In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act....George Orwell
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Introducing: Oskar Schindler https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oskar_Schindler
Introducing: Oskar Schindler: The Untold Account of His Life, Wartime Activities
and the True Story Behind the List by David Crowe https://www.forbes.com/sites/stuartander......7df15537
landmark
View Profile
Inner circle
within a triangle
4557 Posts

Profile of landmark
Quote:
On Oct 16, 2017, miistermagico wrote:
Introducing: Hacking Self-Driving Cars
While automakers focus on defending the systems in their cars against hackers, there may be other ways for the malicious to mess with self-driving cars. Security researchers at the University of Washington have shown they can get computer vision systems to misidentify road signs using nothing more than stickers made on a home printer. UW computer-security researcher Yoshi Kohno described an attack algorithm that uses printed images stuck on road signs. These images confuse the cameras on which most self-driving vehicles rely. In one example, explained in a document uploaded to the open-source scientific-paper site arXiv last week, small stickers attached to a standard stop sign caused a vision system to misidentify it as a Speed Limit 45 sign. The vision systems in autonomous cars typically have an object detector and a classifier: the former spots pedestrians, lights, signs, and other vehicles, and the latter decides what the object is and what the signs are saying. The attacks Kohno described assume that hackers are able to gain access to this classifier and then, using its algorithm and a photo of the target road sign, generate a customized image. The attack relies on the vulnerability of deep neural networks that have been trained to recognize signs, stoplights, and other road users using images from cameras mounted on self-driving vehicles. These systems can be sensitive to malicious perturbations—small, precisely crafted changes to their inputs—that can cause them to misbehave in unexpected and potentially dangerous ways. Researchers have long known that tinkering with what a computer sees can lead to incorrect results. But previous attacks involved changes that were either too extreme—and thus obvious to human drivers—or too subtle, only working from a particular angle or at a certain distance.


The Governor of NY State just announced that there would be self-driving cars on the streets of New York City before the end of next year. The Mayor of NYC who had not been consulted about this decision beforehand understandably hit the roof. The car company spokesman said that the dense, car-laden streets of Manhattan would be the ideal experimental testing ground for such cars. Anyone who lives in NYC knows that this is about the stupidest, most dangerous, potentially traffic-snarling motor vehicles decision ever.
"Don't believe everything you read on the Internet"--Abraham Lincoln

You can read my daily blog at Musings, Memories, and Magic
miistermagico
View Profile
Loyal user
276 Posts

Profile of miistermagico
Dear Landmark,
I have Emailed my Hacking Self-Driving Cars info to the Office of the Mayor of NYC.
Thanks for your feedback.
Sincerely,
miistermagico
NYCTwister
View Profile
Loyal user
279 Posts

Profile of NYCTwister
Quote:
On Oct 19, 2017, landmark wrote:
Quote:
On Oct 16, 2017, miistermagico wrote:
Introducing: Hacking Self-Driving Cars
While automakers focus on defending the systems in their cars against hackers, there may be other ways for the malicious to mess with self-driving cars. Security researchers at the University of Washington have shown they can get computer vision systems to misidentify road signs using nothing more than stickers made on a home printer. UW computer-security researcher Yoshi Kohno described an attack algorithm that uses printed images stuck on road signs. These images confuse the cameras on which most self-driving vehicles rely. In one example, explained in a document uploaded to the open-source scientific-paper site arXiv last week, small stickers attached to a standard stop sign caused a vision system to misidentify it as a Speed Limit 45 sign. The vision systems in autonomous cars typically have an object detector and a classifier: the former spots pedestrians, lights, signs, and other vehicles, and the latter decides what the object is and what the signs are saying. The attacks Kohno described assume that hackers are able to gain access to this classifier and then, using its algorithm and a photo of the target road sign, generate a customized image. The attack relies on the vulnerability of deep neural networks that have been trained to recognize signs, stoplights, and other road users using images from cameras mounted on self-driving vehicles. These systems can be sensitive to malicious perturbations—small, precisely crafted changes to their inputs—that can cause them to misbehave in unexpected and potentially dangerous ways. Researchers have long known that tinkering with what a computer sees can lead to incorrect results. But previous attacks involved changes that were either too extreme—and thus obvious to human drivers—or too subtle, only working from a particular angle or at a certain distance.


The Governor of NY State just announced that there would be self-driving cars on the streets of New York City before the end of next year. The Mayor of NYC who had not been consulted about this decision beforehand understandably hit the roof. The car company spokesman said that the dense, car-laden streets of Manhattan would be the ideal experimental testing ground for such cars. Anyone who lives in NYC knows that this is about the stupidest, most dangerous, potentially traffic-snarling motor vehicles decision ever.


As a New Yorker I second that.

I don't think that any AI that can deal with a NYC cab driver should exist.
If you need fear to enforce your beliefs, then your beliefs are worthless.
NYCTwister
View Profile
Loyal user
279 Posts

Profile of NYCTwister
Introducing - AlphaGoZero.

https://gizmodo.com/stunning-ai-breakthr......19650084

Fasten your seat belts folks because we're racing towards the singularity - ready or not.

Let's see what we're made of when we come face to face with our own potential.
If you need fear to enforce your beliefs, then your beliefs are worthless.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Not very magical, still... » » History and Science: The Terminator is back (0 Likes)
 Go to page [Previous]  1~2~3~4~5~6~7~8~9~10~11~12 [Next]
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2018 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.2 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL