We Remember The Magic Café We Remember
Username:
Password:
[ Lost Password ]
  [ Forgot Username ]
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Trick coin trickery » » Patina (3 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

niva
View Profile
Inner circle
Malta (Europe)
2905 Posts

Profile of niva
Hi guys!

What's the easiest (and fastest) way to create some patina on coins, please. I have read about using Bleach and also Liver of Sulphur.

Thanks for your feedback.
Yours,

Ivan
Scott Horn
View Profile
Loyal user
Dallas, TX
261 Posts

Profile of Scott Horn
If the coins are pure Silver the Liver of Sulfur works great. Be aware... each coin will tarnish differently due to its finish and surface impurities. I know some abhor taking sandpaper to silver coins... but I'm not one of them. Here's what I did.

I used scrubbing pads (like you use on pots and pans, or steel wool) to lightly clear the surface, followed by a washing with soap, then a dunk in Liver of Sulfur.

Next came the "work." The coins will not come out looking the same, and the whole coin will be tarnished. I sanded each coin with the sandpaper wrapped around a hard flat surface (i.e. paint stirrer) so I could sand the raised surfaces and not the recessed. This also allowed me to "soften" the coins. Lastly, and this took some patience... I used VERY small amounts of polish and the tip of my finger to polish the raised surfaces. (I used a "mag wheel" cream polish from Walmart Auto section) The trick is to rub fairly hard on the raised surfaces and avoid the recessed areas. A little polish, rinse off the coin, a little polish, rinse off the coin... and so on

Click here to view attached image.
niva
View Profile
Inner circle
Malta (Europe)
2905 Posts

Profile of niva
I am sure I would ruin the whole thing lol!
Yours,

Ivan
Al Desmond
View Profile
Inner circle
Secret Mountain Lair in Conifer, Co
1345 Posts

Profile of Al Desmond
Except for the fact that silver coins don't usually "tarnish" like the the ones in your picture.

I have 3000 year old Greek and 2000 year old Roman silver coins with no patina or tarnish.

Silver dollars (like Morgans) tone, not really tarnish.

use this Google images search to see what I mean.

https://www.google.com/search?q=toned+si......&bih=736

I'm really not sure where coin workers got the impressions that old silver coins should look blackened.

I understand "soft" (although I feel that "soft" was a marketing scheme, to allow dealers to sell worn coins, which are not worth more than their silver melt value).

There has been some techniques to tone a coin, but that in itself is considered fraud, since generally, toned silver dollars actually sell for MORE than the book value.

Take this for what it is worth. I'm sorry, but I would never perform with coins that have been blackened. That's not the natural aging progression of silver coins.
tonsofquestions
View Profile
Special user
633 Posts

Profile of tonsofquestions
Sure they can. Consider this lot of coins: http://www.ebay.com/itm/69-Pc-Lt-Silver-......fi9Zsvmz or the ones Jeff Copeland sells: https://shop.copelandcoins.com/collections/silver, which I'm 99% sure are untreated.

Not all coins tarnish. It depends on a lot of factors like how much they're handled, what kinds of oils are in the environment (or on people's hands/skin) temperatures, etc. The colored toning is rarer - if memory serves the color has to do with how thick the buildup of oils are - so black is the thickest, and smaller/varying amounts can cause rainbows - but it has to be just the right amount.

It depends on who you ask (and the type of toning) as to whether it's more or less expensive: http://www.coinnews.net/2007/09/03/what-......ue-3565/

It's very similar to how other silver objects tarnish (candlesticks, plates, cutlery, etc) - it definitely happens (they start to get blackish), and that's why people sell/use silver polish.

"Soft" came about from coin collectors. Most numismastists prefer (a) uncirculated and/or proof coins or (b) circulated but with good detail. The dealers call the worn coins "soft" to help categorize them for buyers - it means they're less valuable.

To me, soft coins are just cheaper/easier to get, since fewer people want them, and I suspect early, enterprising coin workers felt the same way. It's a somewhat-coincidence that they're also quiter (they're worn down, so fewer poky bits to rub), which makes them more desirable to us now.

Where it starts to get tricky is when you want multiple coins that match. It's pretty easy (though often pricier) to get uncirculated coins to match (they're clean and sharp, so they all look the same), but soft ones vary a lot, so it can be time consuming to make a matching set (more money for the seller).

It's not a big leap to go from there to "what if we artifically soften them?". You get the quietness from the coins, and we can make them match - but that means they're more expensive because (a) they originally came from uncirculated coins, and (b) time/work to wear them down.

There's no "scheme" - go into any coin dealer, and the soft coins are cheaper. It's only for magicians that soft ones become more - and that's because they're more desirable and require work.

Patina is related - if you're going for the circulated/slightly soft coins, some will likely have some tarnish. You could then (a) clean all of them up to be shiny, or (b) find some you like the look of, and get ones that look similar. A few spots of tarnish looks bad to most people, and is particularly hard to match, but an even tarnish is much easier to find duplicates for.

As with the softness, some people will choose the third option: get someone to artificially age them evenly so that they all match. But, as you say, it ultimately comes down to preference. But when a few big magicians show a preference one way, it affects others' opinions, just like fashion does.
Scott Horn
View Profile
Loyal user
Dallas, TX
261 Posts

Profile of Scott Horn
Regarding patina....... At the end of the day, unless you are performing for true coin collectors or numismatists, I think its all about "looks," and is a personal choice. I've seen full time pro's who like highly polished coins and others who like them looking like they came out of anyone's pocket. I remember when Daryl was first presenting his 3 Fly Three he used Silver Dollars so worn down, even up close they looked like slugs and could barely be made out to be actual coins.

Personally, I think there is a certain beauty to patina'd coins. I was trying to get an "authentic" look and failed. However, the contrast I wound up with shows up well at a distance, and the look provides the eyes something to focus on... and I got all my coins, including hidden extras, and a shell, to match.
niva
View Profile
Inner circle
Malta (Europe)
2905 Posts

Profile of niva
I just like the patina around the details of the coin... that's it. But I am getting a couple of shiny coins and wanted to give them an older look to look like the other coins I have.
Yours,

Ivan
Danwseers
View Profile
New user
49 Posts

Profile of Danwseers
Quote:
On Sep 14, 2017, niva wrote:
I just like the patina around the details of the coin... that's it. But I am getting a couple of shiny coins and wanted to give them an older look to look like the other coins I have.


5 parts Vaseline to one part sulfur. Heat will accelerate the process. You can get sulfur powder on eBay.

You can dumb down the "blackness" or super dark patina by rubbing it around in som dry dirt. Consider that the old coins which are worn are oxidized and dirty. Hope the helps.
The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Trick coin trickery » » Patina (3 Likes)
[ Top of Page ]
All content & postings Copyright © 2001-2017 Steve Brooks. All Rights Reserved.
This page was created in 0.12 seconds requiring 5 database queries.
The views and comments expressed on The Magic Café
are not necessarily those of The Magic Café, Steve Brooks, or Steve Brooks Magic.
> Privacy Statement <

ROTFL Billions and billions served! ROTFL