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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Nothing up my sleeve... » » Coin Roll, at 71 years old am I too old to learn? (2 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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tejinajoka
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Jonathan Townsend wrote on June 10th 2018
Quote:
* was it Chesterton who write the line about a thing worth doing poorly?

To answer your question first, he said it in his book, What's Wrong with the World, which was written in 1910.( and it is badly, not poorly.

The phrase 'If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. comes from the phrase 'Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well'. The first recorded use of this expression is in a letter from Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield to his son on March 10th. 1746. It is from just one of about 400 letters the prolific British statesman wrote to his son over a 30-year period.
History lesson over!

P.S. I am using a U.S.A. Half Dollar
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
Dollarbill
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Quote:
On Jun 12, 2018, tejinajoka wrote:
Jonathan Townsend wrote on June 10th 2018
Quote:
* was it Chesterton who write the line about a thing worth doing poorly?

To answer your question first, he said it in his book, What's Wrong with the World, which was written in 1910.( and it is badly, not poorly.

The phrase 'If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. comes from the phrase 'Whatever is worth doing at all, is worth doing well'. The first recorded use of this expression is in a letter from Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield to his son on March 10th. 1746. It is from just one of about 400 letters the prolific British statesman wrote to his son over a 30-year period.
History lesson over!

P.S. I am using a U.S.A. Half Dollar



How in thee hell do you remember that? 👍.
Dick Oslund
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Hey! Thanks tejinajoka!!!
SNEAKY, UNDERHANDED, DEVIOUS,& SURREPTITIOUS ITINERANT MOUNTEBANK
Jonathan Townsend
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Couple of more questions -
Can you stop the roll between second and third finger knuckles... and turn your hand over (almost deep back clip) - the center of the coin being centered on the proximals?

And how does your pinky prepare for the approaching coin? That exploration led to a recovery sleight.

* There was a paragraph in The Expert about demonstrating skill which inspired a quest to use the steeplechase as a secret sleight.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
tejinajoka
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Jonathan Townsend wrote on Jun 13, 2018
Quote:
Couple of more questions -
Can you stop the roll between second and third finger knuckles... and turn your hand over (almost deep back clip) - the center of the coin being centered on the proximals?

And how does your pinky prepare for the approaching coin? That exploration led to a recovery sleight.

* There was a paragraph in The Expert about demonstrating skill which inspired a quest to use the steeplechase as a secret sleight.


Hi Jonathan, yes if I do as you suggest the coin is centred (U.K. spelling) on the proximals.

I raise my pinky to await the approaching coin, but as I attempt to catch the coin between third finger and pinkey more often than not the coin falls and I then usually swear.

I need to perfect my coin roll before I can attempt the steeplechase as a slight. I have a DVD where Eric Jones does it beautifully.

Excuse the pun but I am no expert, is The Expert you refer to after the asterisk a magazine or a book?
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
tejinajoka
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Dick Oslund wrote on Jun 13, 2018
Quote:
Hey! Thanks tejinajoka!!!


Thanks Dick, you're welcome
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
tejinajoka
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Dollarbill wrote on Jun 13, 2018

Quote:
How in thee hell do you remember that?


I would like to say I am a smart a**, but I am not. His letters to his illegitimate son, to whom he wrote almost daily, are published in a book 'Lord Chesterfield's Letters' published in 1998
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
Jonathan Townsend
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There is a moment when the coin is just past perpendicular to the plane of my fingers when my second and third fingers squeeze together with third finger flexed down somewhat at the knuckle - and the second finger slightly up. Stopping the action: the coin is almost clipped but not perpendicular - it's leaning down toward the pinky at almost forty five degrees thanks to the knuckle shift. That is also the cue for my pinky to get raised up curled. Second finger up, third finger down, pinky curls up. The tip of my pinky is just about able to set up on the knuckle of my third finger. The coin is gripped in two places by the pinky and also pushed against the side of the third finger knuckle and pulled around.


It was the oft quoted book.

On the digression of books, I was going to try and quote a Lenny Henry line from Chef! (about his mother and cooking) but it appears Samuel Johnson did better with "the morals of a *** and the manners of a dancing-master." a good two hundred years earlier.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
Wravyn
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Quote:
On Jun 13, 2018, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Couple of more questions -
Can you stop the roll between second and third finger knuckles... and turn your hand over (almost deep back clip) - the center of the coin being centered on the proximals?

And how does your pinky prepare for the approaching coin? That exploration led to a recovery sleight.

* There was a paragraph in The Expert about demonstrating skill which inspired a quest to use the steeplechase as a secret sleight.


If you hold the opposite hand under your steeplechase hand to catch the coin as you roll it over the pinky. Close your hand when it lands. Do this a couple of times, on the third time you allow it it drop, catch it in a goshman pinch, turning your steeplechase hand palm up, close your fingers as if you caught the coin before. You can then show that the coin has vanished.
Jonathan Townsend
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A quick note on the Chesterton quote - I recalled it from a story read among the Father Brown mysteries, Faultless Felons and Club of Queer Trades... was in the Paradoxes of Mr. Pond. Took a while to find the lines:
Quote:
III. — WHEN DOCTORS AGREE

Mr. Pond's paradoxes were of a very peculiar kind. They were indeed paradoxical defiances even of the law of paradox. Paradox has been defined as "Truth standing on her head to attract attention." Paradox has been defended; on the ground that so many fashionable fallacies still stand firmly on their feet, because they have no heads to stand on. But it must be admitted that writers, like other mendicants and mountebanks, frequently do try to attract attention. They set out conspicuously, in a single line in a play, or at the head or tail of a paragraph, remarks of this challenging kind; as when Mr. Bernard Shaw wrote: "The Golden Rule is that there is no Golden Rule"; or Oscar Wilde observed: "I can resist everything except temptation"; or a duller scribe (not to be named with these and now doing penance for his earlier vices in the nobler toil of celebrating the virtues of Mr. Pond) said in defence of hobbies and amateurs and general duffers like himself: "If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly." To these things do writers sink; and then the critics tell them that they "talk for effect"; and then the writers answer: "What the devil else should we talk for? Ineffectualness?" It is a sordid scene.
...to all the coins I've dropped here
tejinajoka
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Jonathan Townsend wrote on June 10th 2018
Quote:
* was it Chesterton who write the line about a thing worth doing poorly?


Hi Jonathan, I think we should perhaps leave the literature alone now as the site is for magic. Hopefully we have both learned something, at least you now have discovered for yourself that Chesterton wrote the line about a thing worth doing badly not poorly. I have discovered more about Chesterton.

Finally on the written word I saw a humorous sign yesterday, well it made me smile. 'Marriage is like a deck of cards. In the beginning all you need is two hearts and a diamond. By the end, you wished you had a club and a spade'

Back to the coin roll topic, I have now managed (my best so far) five continuous rolls without dropping, but paint would dry faster. Will have to continue and hope to get faster. Practice makes perfect
If it's worth doing it's worth doing well. Philip Stanhope, 4th Earl of Chesterfield (U.K.) in 1746
Conus
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Tejinajoka,

I just sent you a PM with tips.

- Couns
Signet
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I have to say, I find the careful analysis description to be very helpful. It's fun to explore the suttle nuances you guys have posted about. The idea of going into goshman pinch, that's a keeper. I remember a year ago, I couldn't even get the coin into goshman, so I guess I am improving ever so slowly, or Should I say sleightly.😉
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