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The Magic Cafe Forum Index » » Magical equations » » Best Gilbreath Principle Tricks (0 Likes) Printer Friendly Version

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Metalepsis
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I have recently become very interested in this principle, it is strange how people have more trouble understanding this than convergence. Remarkable. Anyway, one of my new favs is 'The angel may shuffle but the devil still deals'. Anybody else have favourite GP tricks?

M
Scott Cram
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In no particular order:

"Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret" by David Williamson (available in a book of the same name)

"Best Bet Yet" by Terry LaGerould (From "A Magical Baker's Dozen", available via Lew Brooks)

"Please Don't Match" by Terry LaGerould (unpublished) - In this effect, the spectator shuffles the deck, takes out 7 cards, and shuffles them. These cards are torn in half, and then these 14 halves are shuffled together. This half-card stack is placed into the performer's pocket (examined previously), and he pulls cards from the pocket one by one, betting that he'll never pull out the remaining half of any card that was previously pulled. The performer always wins the bet.
rgranville
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While I know several effects based on the Gilbreath Principle, and I know it is "a thing of terrifying beauty," I don't precisely know the exact principle itself. Where can I find a write up defining and detailing the Gilbreath Principle?
:carrot:
Metalepsis
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College Math Journal: Volume 31, Number 3, Pages: 173-177 2000 Modeling Mathematics
With Playing Cards Martin Gardner

If you want some homework!

faculty1.coloradocollege.edu

I will look for better explanations...although using coloured balls in tubes is a good way to explain it visually (ask me for details if you like). Are you looking for academic formal analysis or a (mathematically speaking) laymans explanation?

Our own Jim Morton has offered to e-mail anyone a PDF on the subject in a previous thread:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewt......2&38

Which also has some great tricks listed already for this topic, still even though I found that I wanted to start a new thread and hear what people think (maybe someone has changed their mind...or there are new people unaware of the beauty).

M
Hushai
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I am hoping that Phil Goldstein will in fact publish his long-awaited book on Gilbreath before I am too old to shuffle a deck of cards. If it is anything like as clear an explanation of Gilbreath as "Redivider" was of Rusduck, all of us like rgranville and me who are still not sure we understand Gilbreath will rejoice. "Redivider" was wonderful -- the right mix of theory and effects for a non-mathematical layperson like me.
rgranville
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But I do have a mathematical background. I have asked Jim Morton for his writeup. I'm still looking for a precise definition of the principle.
:cucumber:
EmmanuelM
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Quote:
I'm still looking for a precise definition of the principle.

Well, the scientific literature about this principle quote the Linking Ring article by Gilbreath ! Smile

I found some references about the Gilbreath principle not for any real use, but as a test for inductive theorem prover programs : Gilbreath's principle is at the same time easy to formalize, and non-trivial when you want to convince someone that your prover has "found something" that was "neither written in the rules nor in the prover", I guess.

You can find such a reference in :


www.cs.utexas.edu

which starts with :

Quote:
A Mechanical Checking of a Theorem About a Card Trick

Robert S. Boyer, May 22, 1991

This is a formalization, in the Nqthm logic, of a card trick theorem that de Bruijn taught Huet, Huet taught Moore, and Moore taught me.
Metalepsis
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Quote:
I found some references about the Gilbreath principle not for any real use, but as a test for inductive theorem prover programs : Gilbreath's principle is at the same time easy to formalize, and non-trivial when you want to convince someone that your prover has "found something" that was "neither written in the rules nor in the prover", I guess.

I think I'm in love. That's my language. Is this your field or do you just visit?

M
Aron Devin
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One of the best effects I've ever seen was Max Maven's "Mockingbird" effect on his "VideoMind" series. Unbeliveable. It's pert of the L and L series. I remember first seeing it and thinking there had to be a stooge helping him out.
Caliban
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There are some good tricks using the principle in the excellent Card Conspiracy Volume 1 by Duffie and Robertson.
mindhunter
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"Double-Down", but of course I am biased. Smile

The principle really IS a "thing of terrifying beauty..."

Bryn
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LobowolfXXX
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Nick Trost's "The Lone Stranger."
It's the nexus of the crisis
And the origin of storms
JSBLOOM
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Mocking bird by Max Maven.
Scott Cram
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For those who like Mockingbird, check out Sal Piacente's "Memory Opener", which uses a similar approach.
landmark
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Nick Trost's Odd Man Wins
Simon Aronson's Point Spread


Jack Shalom
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Vandy Grift
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Quote:
On 2005-03-13 11:47, Scott Cram wrote:
For those who like Mockingbird, check out Sal Piacente's "Memory Opener", which uses a similar approach.

I use Sals' memory opener a lot, its a great trick. I also believe Sals' "Paint Poker" uses the principle as well, but I am not certain about that one.

Vandy
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graemesd
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Clash of symbols in Thavant - phil goldstein/maven
LordPH
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Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret by David Williamson
Mockingbird by Max Maven.
Lucas Ace & Simeon Salakavala & Julius Joker

Ultimatemagic.Net
Helsinki Street Team
TomasB
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LordPH, what do you do the times Mockingbird doesn't work? There seem to be a fairly big chance of it failing...

Ooops, I was thinking about The Hawk and now this post can only be edited but not erased. Please ignore.

/Tomas
Magiguy
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Aunt Mary's Terrible Secret by David Williamson... I really like this one and the book is so entertaining that it's difficult to put down. You'll also find many, many effects and interesting references in the volumes of "The James File."
Doctor Whoston
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Tomas,
I noticed the Hawk doesn't always work (when I tried to prove that it did work!). Does anyone know Max Maven's opinions on the problem?

Maybe one is just supposed to play the percentages on this one. However, the chances of failing are quite high as you say. About 25% at a quick guess.
As an out, one could use an invisible deck but that's a bit lame.

DW
Cody Fisher
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Sal Piacente's Memory Opener is awesome and can be adapted to fit the performer's style. It can be found on his Expert Card Magic Lecture Notes DVD's.

Cody
TomasB
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Doc, Max told me that he had a fix for it but not what the fix was. As I remember I found a solution myself a couple of years ago. Will try to recover the notes and PM the ideas to you if I find them.

/Tomas
Doctor Whoston
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Hi Tomas!
Thanks. Since I posted I emailed Max Maven and asked him - mainly because I have a fix involving three spectators. I did come up with some two spectator versions but they were ugly or achievable by simpler means.
I'd still be interested to see your solutions.
DW
TomasB
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DW and others that might be interested. This won't make any sense unless you are familiar with Max Maven's clever The Hawk.

A fix for The Hawk
------------------
Have the two spectators cut the deck repeatedly. Spectator 1 takes the top card and spectator 2 takes the next card. Both are asked to remember the cards. Ask spectator 1 to place his card on top of the deck and cut the deck as directed in "The Hawk", but just before he does, say "Oh wait, you might suspect that I caught a glimpse of the bottom card somehow. Please put the bottom card of the deck away in your pocket." He will pocket the bottom card then cut the deck after which you go through the rest of Max Maven's "The Hawk" to right after the shuffle. Ask spectator 2 to replace his card about a quarter from the bottom of the deck. You are set to complete "The Hawk".

After you have gone through the routine and revealed the two selections, you can say "You really made it hard for me by putting that Five of Spades in your pocket!"

/Tomas
hjelm
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... and any tricks with the Gilbreath principle without any playing cards?
Doctor Whoston
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Hi hjelm,
Does using ESP cards count?
DW
Doctor Whoston
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Tomas,
I don't see how this fixes the Hawk. Forget the cutting and taking of two cards we can model the problem by the following. Start with the Hawk set up. Remove say the fifth card from top and put it in a pocket. Now imagine a riffle shuffle that does not disturb the top 6 cards. Such a situation is possible in your method.
See the problem?
Maybe I'm missing something...
DW
TomasB
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Doc, you are indeed missing something. You can't possibly find a case where what I suggested does not work. I'll try to explain why it works and can't fail since I don't quite see how the situation you describe can be reached from my instructions.

By removing the card below the first selection (it's the second selection which is put in the deck much later after the riffle shuffle) AND the card above it (in fact the face card of the deck) we have created a row of three cards of the same orientation in the deck where the middle card is the first spectator's selection.

Now, imagine that middle card being of the opposite orientation instead. We'd then have an ordinary deck set up for Gilbreath and that card WILL be paired with a card of the opposite orientation after the shuffle, thanks to Gilbreath. But the selecton in fact has the opposite orientation in this case hence it will be paired with a card with excatly the _same_ orientation so we will indeed find it with the method Max Maven intended in "The Hawk". In short, if Gilbreath works, my solution works. And Gilbreath works. Smile

/Tomas
Doctor Whoston
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Sorry, yes indeed I did miss something: The bottom card is removed before the cut. I get it now. My apologies.

My solution uses three spectators and the same idea of having "three-in-a-row" cards. It should be fairly easy to deduce how to do this!

Anyhow, yours is a good solution. I hadn't thought of getting the spectator to remove the bottom card. I did consider palming it off but once you are allowed to touch the deck in such a manner you may as well use a different (non-Gilbreath) method to achieve the effect.

DW
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