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Topic: Making your own mark with magic!
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Apr 29, 2005 07:08AM)
It is a good thing to learn from some of the Masters like Gazzo or Celini.
I first started with C&B and general magic about 15 years ago before I went pro but I learnt the hard way, on my own. Then I got better by studying Celini his books and videos. Then Gazzo came on tour to the UK providing a master class so I jumped at that, and my C&B have never been the same.

How do we make our selfís stand out?

When I look at these masters we can include others like Michael Armmar. The one key to there success is each have there own identity. They are not carbon copies of each other.

My routen is heavily influenced by these masters and I would give 75% credit to Gazzo but I am also striving to set my self apart. I donít want to be as good as someone elseís routen; I want the best entertainer I can be in magic. So right from the start I am looking to see how I can achieve that.

Take for example look-alikes; no Mel Gibson look-alike is going to be more famous than Mel Gibson. They will make Mel Gibson more famous even if they both entertain. A magical example is David Blaine; there is a lot of waner-bes that walk about doing David Blaine, kind of stile walk about magic. But the public see the stile and think David Blaine.

It is important that we learn from successes in show business.

1 What can you do to set your self apart?
2 What are you doing to set our self apart?

Mario
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Apr 29, 2005 08:46AM)
I want to be like Mario Morris..
Is that enough of setting myself apart ? :kermit:

Kidding aside, what MM mentioned is *the way*, but it really IS hard to forget *the best* one has seen..
Here I don't necessarily mean the best performer, but the best way to handle and present a certain effect seen done by a real master..
It is hard to imagine, it could be done better and so one is 'almost' forced to copy and imitate his handling and presentation exactly..and this way, one has to copy probably a lot of different performers way of handling and presenting different effects.

It's the wrong way to go of course, but it takes REAL work to leave that route...
Message: Posted by: Roland Henning (Apr 29, 2005 09:45AM)
Here is my maybe simple minded advice: Once you have a decent act, stay away from all other magicians, books and DVD's for about three to four years. Perform a lot during the time and you will see that you are naturally different and unique from all others.

mmG Roland
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Apr 29, 2005 10:26AM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-29 10:45, Roland Henning wrote:
Here is my maybe simple minded advice: Once you have a decent act, stay away from all other magicians...[/quote]That's a very interesting remark, because I've heared it before, many, many years back.
The one mentioning it was Ken Brooke, also he put it in another way.

He said, he NEVER watched other magicians act, because that might influence his own way of working..

This actually is an interesting theme, because John Ramsay said exactly the opposite..
He said, *watch each and every magician you have a chance to watch..if he's good, you can learn something, if he's bad, you can be more pleased with yourself*..

Maybe not excatly the words he used, or KB did use, but out of memory as close as it can get.
I realize though, KB did mingle with magicians -still he might have avoided to se their act-, he had to, as he did sell GREAT magic and ideas to fellow magicians.

I suppose the truth lies between what both these great performers said and what Roland tells here, actually HIS tip is more clear and a better one, IMHO, but mind you, it is mainly aimed at pro performers, amateurs love to mingle with fellow magicians :goof: ..
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Apr 29, 2005 11:09AM)
Which of those two routes you go, largely depends on the individual and how much they value their own uniqueness. Some people will never copy, regardless of how many magicians they see, while others will never learn to think independantly.

To add a slight variation to the statement credited to Mr. Ramsay: ...if he is good, you can learn something; if he is bad, you can learn more.

Had the opportunity to work at the Paris Air Show several years ago, and during my off time in the city, took some time to go to the magic show at Le Double Fond. The absolutely most impressive fact was that the three magicians on the show were radically different from one another, and more importantly, radically different from any acts I had ever seen anywhere. They performed a round robin show format, each making a couple of appearances throughout. One guy in particular presented completely different characters and styles everytime he came onstage. To me, that's going the extra mile to stand apart.

It changed my own perspective of magic and really cemented the idea that beingdifferent, although often harder, is the best way.

It has also changed the way I am able to market myself. Now, when I am approached by a prospective client, it is generally because they want ME, and not just a magician, one of many similar that can be "rented" off the rack.

~michael
Message: Posted by: muzicman (Apr 29, 2005 11:33AM)
I have seen many magic acts and performances. I am sure I am not unique that each of these presented something I liked, and something I didn't like. Whether it was the personality, the effect, the patter, I think we all have opinions. We also all have our own ideas that we can vary to suit our own needs. I like what Michael said above..

[quote].if he is good, you can learn something; if he is bad, you can learn more[/quote]

That pretty well sums it up for me as well. I will always watch others perform, and not just magic. A great performance is a lifelong journey for me, not just a destination.
Message: Posted by: BroDavid (Apr 29, 2005 11:50AM)
I think that for real performers, the issue of being different is the result of the quest to stand out from the crowd, and create and develop their own identity.

As a result, unless a performers goal is to be a clone of someone else, (Elvis impersonators as an example) or is some kid tring to be Blaniac, the end result of doing things your way, is that it is your way, and no one else's way.

Nobody does what I do, the way I do it. Why not? Because they are not me. They could dress like me, although I don't anyone ele with poor enoguht taste to do that, and even if they end up looking like me, or sounding like me. They wont do my act my way beacuse they cant think like me, respond s I do to circumstances,e tc. Not that I do everything as well as it could be done... far from it. But it is all done my way ;)

So I guess, I don' think is much worry about unique identities for real performers. Pros, do what tehy need to do, and that is be themselves. While amatuers are content with being clones or imperesonators.

That's my story, and I am sticking it to you.

BroDavid
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Apr 29, 2005 12:03PM)
Would someone please tell me what C&B is, because if Mario wants a good C&B so do I. I like nice T&A, but I don't think he meant that.
Tanks
Al Angello
Message: Posted by: kid iowa (Apr 29, 2005 12:08PM)
Cups and Balls
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Apr 29, 2005 12:09PM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-29 13:03, juggleral wrote:
Would someone please tell me what C&B is, because if Mario wants a good C&B so do I. I like nice T&A, but I don't think he meant that.
Tanks
Al Angello
[/quote]Well, C&B is an age old thingy most think they do well, but they don't.. :goof:
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Apr 29, 2005 12:18PM)
Thanks BroDavid,

I have a different thought on that, you can and there are many impersonators that make more money than you or me, because they are pros.

I donít think this thread is about worry but rather how do you make your mark beyond what you have already achieved. This is about bettering your self setting goals in the world of entertainment.
If one is happy with where they are at, they will not continue to grow and develop that is great if they are happy.
If you are not happy with where you are at then you are aware you have not reached your full potential but you are happy to try, that me thatís my story.

Do you have any thoughts on my 2 original questions?
Mario
PS
C&B = Cups and Balls
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Apr 29, 2005 12:42PM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-29 13:18, Mario Morris wrote:
Do you have any thoughts on my 2 original questions?
[/quote]
1 What can you do to set your self apart?
2 What are you doing to set our self apart?

Re 1.
We all need some inspiration to delevop 'ourselfes' to be different, so here is a thought.

When NOT out working, but out at a party, at public places,whereever, have a look for some person that somehow 'stands-out' in one way or another, maybe you overhear him telling a story, maybe it is 'just' a 'clerk' selling stuff/cloth, in a fascinating/certain way, whatever in a store.

IF you find that guy somehow 'interesting' and you also have the feeling you're not alone, but others do to, try to analyze the *why* he's fascinating.

Don't choose another entertainer for this to look out for, just any normal person that soemhow stands out..

After analyzing *why* he stands-out try to incorporate some of that guy into youself to form a similar character.

As you just watched 'life' and normal ppl, this is not exactly 'stealing' material from a fellow entertainer, but adapting 'life' and learning from 'others'..as mentoned, we all need some inspiration.

As magicians also should be actors, what I mentioned makes sense..

Take Daryl, he's not the same person off stage when not performing, neither are many other 'characters'..

Re 2.
As I'm not making my living from performning, I don't 'need' to follow my own advice, but I most certainly would use that approach IF I was in the bizz. Still Im try to watch and study human behaviour and try to find out why some ppl are more interesting to socialize with then others..

I'm playing for the fun, nevertheless I act a bit, one has too, otherwise the normal 'guy' would probably be too boring..

There are very few not needing this 'acting', ppl like Dai Vernon..there was no difference weather he performed or not, it was the same guy, but a pro performer-I think- has to transform himself into a magician, when he is *on*..

Just my humble thoughts re your questions..
My above thoughts covers everything, meaning it includes the way ppl dress, move, talk aso..
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Apr 29, 2005 12:50PM)
TT, C&B, CMH is there a reference guide for those of us who only speak English. If anyone wants to know what T's & A's are you will have to PM me. (LOL)
Confused
Al
Message: Posted by: Royston South (Apr 29, 2005 02:30PM)
I'm off for a large G&T to think.

1 What can you do to set your self apart?
2 What are you doing to set your self apart?

Mario

Its inside you, I enjoy being entertained by other magicians and like many others
appreciate the work, do I want to be them? mmmmm NO. maybe a little - only the ones like me.

Do I want to float that note? mmmmm NO it's not me.

What about that great zig-zag illusion? mmmmmm NO it's not me.

What about those three shells and that lovely pea? NOW YOUR TALKING and those lovely cups, don't forget the dice, that's me.
I'v already started to set me self apart by knowing who I am.

I think so many "magicians" see a great effect preformed and think I'll do that and that one oh and that one, They end up doing nothing there not going to set them selfs apart because they don't know who they are, To be successfull I have to be like him no him no it must be him.

How have I set my self apart from other magicians I know? I tell my audience that I cheat because that's my character. NO BECAUSE THAT'S ME.

Just get out there and mess with them and be your self.


Good luck

Royston
HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Apr 29, 2005 02:32PM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-29 10:45, Roland Henning wrote:
Here is my maybe simple minded advice: Once you have a decent act, stay away from all other magicians, books and DVD's for about three to four years. Perform a lot during the time and you will see that you are naturally different and unique from all others.

mmG Roland
[/quote]
Roland

Thanks for your thoughts; I went down that route you suggested when I first started. The truth is I thought I was good until I sore others perform and that just made me want to get better ten years latter I still want to better my self.

I think today we are spoiled with advice, books, DVD and lessons and we should take full advantage of this.

This does not stop us looking to develop an angle in our character that makes us stand out. You know, the hard man of Magic, The gentle man of magic, the clown of magic, all the sick nutter of magic. I think every angle is covered; nothing is new under the sun other than your self. So the question I ask my self is what can I bring to that angle? How can I develop my character and most impotently will people want to watch the end product?

Mario

Thanks, Royston
For the record my questions are directed at you rather than how I should go about it.

I have already said how I am going about to develop my self. I am interested in how other performers are going about answering those questions for them selfís if they have asked them self them.

Personally I think it is a mistake to develop a character based upon a prop, a mistake I have made often. I think we should develop our prop around our character only then can we see the true potential of props. If we donít then we will not take so many risks our character will not develop and will still be in the shallow end of performance.

Take for example the Milk erne escape, I have never liked this prop until the other day I sore it performed by a performer hows character I liked. Suddenly this prop holds new potential. What does that say about me, well my character is limited. That is not setting my self apart.

I suggest before we through the baby out with the bath water look at again and ask your self this.
How can I make my character fit this prop?
Not how can I fit this prop to my character? You may never use the prop, I mean I canít fit an erne in my shoulder bag but by asking this question I am developing my character. I will come up with a different presentation. Your character will be stretched challenged and uncomfortable I think that is a good place for performers to be.

The truth of the matter is not many magicians that reach the height of what we are talk about. If they did then thy will be world famous or at least famous in the magic world. We should keep this in mind I am sure they will give a peneys worht sooner all later.

Do let me know how you anwer the qwestions for your self.

Mario
PS HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE is my mates moto as well
Message: Posted by: Royston South (Apr 29, 2005 03:56PM)
Mario
I was talking about myself and how I'm developing my character.
But It's definitely an on going quest.

All the Best

Royston
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Apr 29, 2005 04:54PM)
Oh I got you, great stuff thanks
Mario
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (Apr 30, 2005 08:25AM)
The one thing we often fail to recognize is that every single person IS unique.
You are unprecedented. There has never been and there will never be anyone like you.
In order to 'be different' all you have to do is be yourself.
Do whatever comes naturally and you will automatically be original.


Now, if this post has enlightened you, please put money in my hat!
Message: Posted by: Royston South (Apr 30, 2005 10:20AM)
RiffRaff you got it, have a large J.D.

Royston
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Apr 30, 2005 11:02AM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-30 09:25, RiffRaff wrote:
The one thing we often fail to recognize is that every single person IS unique.
You are unprecedented. There has never been and there will never be anyone like you.
In order to 'be different' all you have to do is be yourself.
Do whatever comes naturally and you will automatically be original.


Now, if this post has enlightened you, please put money in my hat!
[/quote]Well, also what you say is entierly correct, that persona, in this example *you*/whoever, isn't necessarily [b]INTERESTING for the specs to watch[/b] and spend time on!
I still think it takes a little more then just *being oneselfes*!
You have to be an 'interesting' character too..

And watch out for Mario re coming close and putting money in your hat...when you count the money before and afterwards, the final result might be less :kermit:
(Sorry Mario, I couldn't resist :) )
Message: Posted by: Wayne Whiting (Apr 30, 2005 02:52PM)
This is an area I have always struggled with. I have heard, "Be ourself","Develop your own character","Don't copy others." The problem is, I am not very charismatic, not a comedian, and not all that entertaining. I have no flare for funny lines with people rolling on the floor when they watch my act.

What got me thinking more was watching Michael Finney's 3rd DVD. He says over and over,"I want you to do these tricks, but don't use my lines. They work for me and you need to develop your own lines. If they work for you, then I'm happy for you, but you need to develop your own act. You can use these lines, but people are going to say, 'Oh, that's Michael Finney's act." He is hammering home this idea to be yourself. I have ordered his second DVD which is performance only and for what I am hoping is some encouragment along the line of developing your own charcter.

To be honest, to copy someone else's patter and presentation is the easy way out for me. I have used the patter that came with the trick, or was published in the book, or I got from another magician. I can amaze people, make the client glad they hired me, but my phone is not ringing off the hook for more gigs.

I think the answer is to just go out and pay the pauper for experience. Sooner or later with enough performances under your belt you will now what works for you and your personality. I think I also need to become comfortable with who I am and that I don't need to be Cellini, Gazzo or Finney to be successful.
Message: Posted by: Royston South (Apr 30, 2005 04:01PM)
Magic Junkie you will find it because you know it's the way forward.

Look at Tommy Cooper his character is an extension of who he was.
David Blaine his character is an extension of who he is, he could never be Tommy and Tommy could never be Blaine that's why they succeeded they know who they were.

May be your not supposed to be funny Darren Brown's not really funny but he succeeded when he found who he really was.

It comes from within you, you will have something special that know one has and you will be the ONLY person doing that character, like all the famous people around us not one of them is alike, Take a good look.

Mario Morris you,ve started something

Good luck

Royston
Message: Posted by: Dr_Stephen_Midnight (Apr 30, 2005 05:23PM)
The worst level of 'clonism' can be found among escape artists, many of whom spend all their time angrily trying to 'top' each other and prove that they are 'the greatest.'

To me, the whole idea of the 'world's greatest' escape artist (or magician) is like trying to pinpoint he world's greatest comedian or rock band; it's a farce. Each performer has (or should have) their own style.

I'm hoping we can soon rid ourselves of that old, outdated vaudeville/circus 'world's greatest' hang-up.

Steve
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (Apr 30, 2005 06:04PM)
I suggest a book called "Maximum Entertainment" by Ken Weber.
This high-lights six pillers to succses in entertainment.
It is a great book, at least I think so.
Mario
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (Apr 30, 2005 09:30PM)
[quote]
On 2005-04-30 15:52, Magic Junkie wrote:
The problem is, I am not very charismatic, not a comedian, and not all that entertaining. I have no flare for funny lines with people rolling on the floor when they watch my act.
[/quote]

Sounds like you're stealing Mario's persona.:)
Sorry, the Viking in me made me say that.
...
There is no reason why your act must be funny.
But if you're not entertaining then get off the stage.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 1, 2005 10:08AM)
The Viking in you made you say it, OK.
Mario
Message: Posted by: Wayne Whiting (May 1, 2005 02:21PM)
Thanks for the book reccommendation Mario. It looks good!
Message: Posted by: Magicmaven (May 1, 2005 04:54PM)
I have only been into magic for about 6 years, so take what I say with a grain of salt.

I don't try to make myself "stand out."
I just copy a routine (for me it was Vernon's) and expand on things I liked, and changed things I didn't like, or things that the audience seemed to not like.

I would try and do the best, most magical, entertainting magic. If you do stand out-- people will tell you why/how. Standing out is simple: dye your hair red, ware a speedo, and and enourmous shoes-- you WILL stand out. Standing out in a possitive way, that is the trick. I don't think your focus should be on standing out, but rather be on performing good magic. You will stand out for something special within you, and your character, I wouldn't try trying to stand out for something beacuase it will probebly something you are not.

That's just what I think...
Message: Posted by: cstreet_1986 (May 1, 2005 05:28PM)
Unfortunately, we all have to learn from somewhere (unless your the genius who came up with all you're own magic and an entire act that can be classed as yours and yours alone). This means that we all probably share similarities and are probably very much alike. The problem is that we all have to learn from somewhere...
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 1, 2005 06:23PM)
No, no, no, I am getting frustrated with the thread I started and my lack of ability to explain my self.

It may be within, in most cases I donít think it is even there. You canít stand before this world and say "look at me it is within". Our aim should be to make people take notice, not because of the clothes you wear or your hair.
No itís because in there eyes you are the best performer they have seen, weather you are doing magic, comedy what ever.

You may not be the best magician in the world but if you convince people you are then your job is done.

When I leave a venue I know they wonít forget me or my name because I tell them they wonít. I donít just perform tricks but I create magic in peopleís lives. They are left thinking about what I have done long after I have left.
When I am on the streets similar aims other than my audience is now visiting my domain. My aim is all ways to leave a lasting positive memory of my self and my show. To leave people in a sense of wonder, I might be doing something as simple as making a hanky disappear. On the other hand if I say.

"You about to witness 25 years of my life, watch, to night you will talk about this silk hanky and you will never forget me. My name is Mario Morris."

Nine times out of ten they wont forget.
Mario
Message: Posted by: Zack (May 1, 2005 06:32PM)
"You about to witness 25 years of my life, watch, to night you will talk about this silk hanky and you will never forget me. My name is Mario Morris."

NICE!!

Very well done, Mario!

I'll never forget the busker I saw in Harvard Square when I was twelve years old. He changed the course of my life.

His name was Gazzo.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 1, 2005 06:34PM)
Never herd of him.
Mario LOL
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (May 1, 2005 09:14PM)
There is a lot of truth in some of the above statements re it is the *watchers* impression he gets from a performer/performance.

To many ppl never having se a magician perform, and I give here just one example of a performer, Johnny Paul, was the greatest magician in the world for *them*..and TBH, he to is *one* of the greatest for me.

The *why* is onvious for those having seen him perform..he stood out because he not only provided incredible well done and deceptive magic, but also was VERY entertaining, he *got to them*, he intercated with them, he made the specs feel important, those who assistet and those watching got fun out of his remarks to and with the specs..
To this day, whenever I se Johnny Paul perform (on tape), I get in a good mood!

Each and every time..

His humour is *getting to you*, his line, no matter how often you have heared them are still funny, because of the interaction with diff. specs reacting a bit differently..
To me too..and I'v eseen a lot great perfomers, Johnny Paul still is the one that stands out...

NOT because of fingerflinging sleight of hand (he also used an R&S deck, f.ex.), but because of smooth, expert and entertaining handling of the effects he did a lifetime, he had his repaertoire and it was large, especially the way he could vary his routines..no matter if he was satnding on a stage being assisted by 2 ladies doing his cards across, or he did it behind the bar or sitting at a table, it was eaqully well done, with all the bits of bizz and his personality came through, but mind you, this was built up by thousands of performances under fire..

One can't get a such performer over night...it takes a lifetimne!
Message: Posted by: Wayne Whiting (May 2, 2005 01:28PM)
An update is in order. I did a show last night and it was a great success. Got a $25 tip and everyone asked for my card before leaving. What was different? I decided to take Cellini's advice and "make them like me from the start." I also decided to be myself and tell jokes from my own experiences instead of trying to copy someone I thought was funny. Michael Finney is right. It doesn't work.

But I think Mario is right as well. You need to work at making your magic and your character unforgettable. Mario's original intent was to discuss making our own idenity...Something I really needed help with. I have been doing magic for 40 years, trying to be someone else. I have all the moves down and even co-authored a book on card magic (Pasteboard Presentations with Terry LaGerould), but my magic lacked a very important ingredient...entertainment value. When I leave a show I want people to not only say,"Wow, wasn't that amazing?" But also, "Wow, wasn't that fun?" Mario, I hope this helps to get this thread back to your original purpose.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 2, 2005 05:01PM)
Magic Junkie
That great
It sounds like a great night well done.
"Unforgettable character and show" that is what we should have called this thread.
Mario
Message: Posted by: Jaz (May 2, 2005 05:38PM)
"Making your own mark with magic!"

Lot's of magicians here seem to be doing the same tricks. ACR, C&B, Red Hot Mama, etc, etc.
Will they make a mark or stand out?

Who has made a mark on magic?
What was that mark? What moved them to the forefront?
An original trick, method, character, good publicity? An innovation, a style, good entertainment value?
Who stands out today and why?

Answer these questions and you may find a limelight.
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (May 2, 2005 09:53PM)
[quote]
On 2005-05-02 18:38, Jaz wrote:

Lot's of magicians here seem to be doing the same tricks. ACR, C&B, Red Hot Mama, etc, etc.
Will they make a mark or stand out?

[/quote]Acually one of them can, IF he does it better then any of his competitors, not in sense of 'technic' but in sense of entertainment..

It is not too good *all* magicians are doing exactly the same routines, but still one of them can be outstanding..
All this reminds me of what the Professor told Albert Goshman once..
*Just do one single routine better then anybody else in the world and you'll get recognized*..we all know he did choose *Spellbound* and we all know he did it so expertly everybody else wanted to se HIM doing it..

I'l never forget *Mike* Gordon Miller doing the Afghan Bands, that was one outstanding piece of entertainment!
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 3, 2005 05:04AM)
Jaz
I think the questions are good and what this thread is about.
If you could go any way in answering the questions youíre self and then add your Idears to this thread, that would be great.
Mario
Message: Posted by: chrisrkline (May 3, 2005 06:47AM)
There is a place for all kinds of magicians. I have no real desire to leave a mark on magic, not in the sense that someone like a Vernon or a Marlo might leave. I am 44 and have done magic less than three years. Since I am the sole breadwinner in the family, I will remain a full time teacher. So I do C&B's (Gazzo's,) Rings (Haydn's,) some rope (Pro. Paul's,) and some cards, including Red Hot Mamma. What I want is to do shows for people, make them smile a lot, and even laugh out loud at times, and have them walk away amazed, mystified, and entertained. I want to draw some 30 to 50-person crowds and hold them from start to finish. I don't worry about people in the crowd who might say, "Well, he does the cups OK, but he is just doing Gazzo's routine. He is no Tommy Wonder." In other words, I don't need to impress that type of magician who can't stand seeing the same old stuff over and over.

There is a place for competent performers, even if they are performing the same stuff as others. When I worked on how I perform for ordinary spectators and stopped worrying about learning every trick in the world or inventing my own, things changed. I began to settle on a handful of effects that work and I saw my overall personal enjoyment increase as well as my own skill. But that is leaving a mark, I suppose. There are now real people who know who I am. I have seen several kids and one teenager come by and watch me every time I have been downtown. So who knows with time how good I will get. No one else in Little Rock does this busking thing, so who knows what kind of a mark I might leave after all.

Sometimes you don't hit the target until you stop trying to hit it.

So although I do others routines, I play to my strengths, which is the natural banter I do with the crowd. I still have enormous room for improvement. I have stopped trying to use others' jokes, because they fall flat. When I just talk, in the context of my script, I become much more entertaining. I am not afraid to modify here and there, but I try to have a reason, and I try them out on the crowds. Right now I trying to add something from the Don Alan chop cup routine to one phase of the Cups. I do not know if it messes up the pace, or is a great addition. I don't know, because I have to get out there next Saturday and see with real people.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 3, 2005 11:45AM)
That sounds great, nothing bad with a Gazzo routine that is what I do with slite twist hear and there. As far as leavining my mark that is yet to happen and it wont be on my level of skill but rather comedy magic which takes a diffrent kind of skill.
Mario
Message: Posted by: Arkadia (May 3, 2005 12:48PM)
When got into magic for real, (i.e not adding some easy magic tricks into my juggling show.) I, like everybody else, copied the trick, the lines and the style. If I did "Conscience overload" (Kenton Knepper) I tried to be Knepper as much as I could. The same happened to me when I did a mental show some years ago - I tried to become Max Maven. Then I left those tricks behind and developed by going out on the streets. That - according to me - is the best thing I have ever done. By bringing magic and juggling to the street I was forced to develop a real character and to create routines around him. When I later picked up my old tricks I performed them just as I remembered them - but when I watched the DVDs I found out that I did not use the same slights, the same lines and did the trick in a very different way. I didn't even know this change came about. I believe the change happened because of the finding of my character. And as I said - I thank the streets for that! I believe that because people can leave whenever they want - it forces you to be fast, funny, interesting and witty. On a regular corp. show the audience pretty much has to sit around during your act. Then you have to wait around until your next booking - and that can take forever. The street is always open. (Okay, not during the winter unless you're really enthusiastic) That way you can do hundreds of shows and develop much quicker.

And I couldn't agree more with Mario Morris - props have to fit your character. Cups and balls fit me like a clove so I don't have to change anything. But the Miser's Dream, a routine which is just great and beautiful, didn't fit bit was great and beautiful!). Until I changed the champagne bucket into a rusty, beat up bucket. Then the Miser's Dream worked.

So, what do I do to make my tricks and my show to stand out? I sit at a cafť and drink lots of coffee writing down lines, jokes and routines. Then I go home and toss around my props and try to get a trick going. I speak loud and pretend to interact with my audience. At those practice sessions I usually find new lines, change the written ones and come up with a presentation I like. Unfortunately I don't come up with to many tricks and routines myself - but I try as much as I can. The only bit in my circle show that is entirely mine is my linking rings routine - and that one I am very happy with.

/Ark
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 3, 2005 01:35PM)
Ark
That is Pricless.
Mario
Message: Posted by: Jaz (May 3, 2005 03:33PM)
Another question.
Where do you want to make your mark? On the magic community or the public?
I think the public. Yes?

I wouldn't mind seeing others more knowledgable than me about magic history reply to my questions.

[i]Who has made a mark on magic?
What was that mark? What moved them to the forefront?[/i]
Too many to name here but unique acts and good publicity seems real. A lot seem to have stood out among magicians but are not well known to the public.

[i]An original trick, method, character, good publicity? An innovation, a style, good entertainment value?
Who stands out today and why?[/i]
For the public I think these guys are best known. In no particular order.
[list]
[*] Blaine - because he does intimate magic that was rarely seen before. He does strange stunts not seen by this generation. Maybe since Houdini.
[*] Copperfield - What can I say. Charisma and super magic.
[*] Penn and Teller - Two guys similar Laurel and Hardy who do funny stuff. An old formula with a few twists.
[*]Lance Burton - To me he's more classic style. It works for him
[/list]

These are "out there". TV likes them.

These may not as well known but they're out there.

~Ricky Jay - He's a card specialist and very good and entertaining.
~Rudy Colby - made a hit with mutiple legs.
~Amazing Johnathan - Wild comedy magic.

Unique stuff, charisma and good promoting, good promoting and ...never mind.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 4, 2005 05:26AM)
Jaz
You wouldn't mind seeing others more knowledgeable than you in magic history reply to your questions.

Join the queue, LOL.

As for your questions I donít think we are looking at the same song sheet but I do appreciate your input.
Keep on keeping on
Mario
P.S I have been trying to see some of your art work on your web-site I cant find it, do you have a link to any?
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (May 4, 2005 07:44AM)
[quote]
On 2005-05-01 11:08, Mario Morris wrote:
The Viking in you made you say it, OK.
Mario
[/quote]

Alright, it was a cheap shot.
I have seen your video and it looks good.

However, I think your home page should be larger -
that way you don't have to squat to fit inside of it.
Message: Posted by: Mario Morris (May 4, 2005 02:04PM)
What do you mean?
Mario
Message: Posted by: cstreet_1986 (May 5, 2005 06:43PM)
I have just took a quick look on penguinmagic.com and found that Jay Sankey has a new product called Create Your Own Magic, which apparently teaches you to add a bit of yourself to your magic. Check it out, I haven't really taken a good look because I am watchin the election results and am kinda drunk at the moment.

http://www.penguinmagic.com/product.php?ID=1000
Message: Posted by: markmagic (May 9, 2005 07:22PM)
Not only should you add a bit of yourself to the routines you do, You should listen to the spectators comments. I was doing a ring and string routine years ago, when I placed a ladies ring on the rope, a spectator said, " be careful, it may turn your rope green." A funny line, used right, it always gets a laugh!