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Topic: Entertainment Trivia Quiz
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jun 26, 2005 08:47PM)
1. Who is the Green Hornet's grand-uncle?

2. Who was the first actor to ever play James Bond?

3. Why is the amusement park named [i]Six[/i] Flags?

4. What famous phrase was first uttered by Horace Logan on March 31, 1956?

5. What do the TV shows Petticoat Junction, Wild Wild West and Little House on the Praries have in common with the movies High Noon and Back To The Future?

6. By what name is Ted Giannoulas better known?

7. What was the name of the character in 1600's Commedia dell'Arte performances who was primarily known for hitting other characters on the butt with a slapstick?

8. This famous entertainer's first job involved being paid to draw crowds by pretending to drown, and letting the lifeguard save him. Name him.

9. Where did the term "peanut gallery" originate?

10. How can you tell a real G.I. Joe doll from a fake?
Message: Posted by: blazes816 (Jun 26, 2005 11:11PM)
8. Chauncey Leopardi
Message: Posted by: dr chutney (Jun 27, 2005 03:02AM)
2. Barry Nelson in a 1954 US TV production of Casino Royale.

An actor called Bob Simmons did the signature gun barrel opening scene for the first three Bond films, so you could say he was the first actor to portray James Bond in the movies.
Message: Posted by: dr chutney (Jun 27, 2005 03:11AM)
5. The same train. Historic Sierra Railroad engine number 3.
Message: Posted by: The Mighty Fool (Jun 27, 2005 04:43AM)
1) The lone ranger

7) Pantalone?

9) The Howdy Doody show

10) (wild guess) The real ones are anatomacly correct?
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Jun 27, 2005 04:54AM)
Isn't the thumb of one hand on a G.I. Joe backwards and it was done for copyright purposes to know when someone duplicates them?
As for 7, I don't remember the spelling, but it's something like Puncinello.

Greg
Message: Posted by: The Mighty Fool (Jun 27, 2005 05:23AM)
7) AH! Thank you Greg...it's Arlechino!!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jun 27, 2005 06:40AM)
10) a reversed thumb
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Jun 27, 2005 08:24AM)
3. The Six Flags that have flown over Texas.
US/Texan/Mexican/Confederate...anyone know the other two?
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jun 27, 2005 08:31AM)
#4 "Elvis has left the building."

#6 The San Diego Chicken
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 27, 2005 08:33AM)
3) The amusements parks started in Texas. The guy who started them used the term Six Flags to represent the six (countries) flags that had flown over Texas through it's history.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 27, 2005 11:39AM)
WOW, Lambert and Stans answers wasn't up there when I posted. Now it says they posted a few minutes before I did. It's too late for me to delete my post. Good one guys.

Scott, what is the answer to #18 on the Worlds Hardest Trivia Thread? I still think about it and you posted it months ago.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Jun 27, 2005 01:16PM)
I found the answer to that number 18...

http://forums.fark.com/cgi/fark/comments.pl?IDLink=1071537
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 27, 2005 01:47PM)
[quote]
On 2005-06-27 14:16, Stephen Buxton wrote:
I found the answer to that number 18...

http://forums.fark.com/cgi/fark/comments.pl?IDLink=1071537


[/quote]

Stephen, I couldn't find it on that page. Could you tell aprox where it is on there? Nice website BTW.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Jun 27, 2005 01:55PM)
Search the page for the word that is on the door in my puzzle...
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 27, 2005 02:36PM)
Thank You!! that's been bugging me for a while. Thonk they really summoned Soupy Sales to the trial? LOL
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jun 27, 2005 09:19PM)
Let's see who was the first to get each question right, and which questions have yet to be answered:

1. The Mighty Fool

2. Dr. Chutney

3. Lambertmoon - but we still need the particular flags for extra credit!

4. StanAlger

5. Dr. Chutney

6. StanAlger

7. The Might Fool - although the French name is more recognizable to most people: Harlequin

8.

9.

10. Greg Arce

Vandy Grift - yes, it was Soupy Sales.

That just leaves #8 and #9!
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Jun 28, 2005 07:55AM)
3) The other two flags are French and Spanish. I cheated and looked it up.

Mighty's answer to # 9 was The Howdy Doody show. is that wrong?
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Jun 28, 2005 08:06AM)
I thought it was Howdy Doody, too. Isn't that what the small audience of kids was called in that show?

Greg
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jun 28, 2005 08:22AM)
Sorry, but the term "Peanut Gallery" didn't originate with the Howdy Doody show. I don't doubt, however, that the Howdy Doody show gave the term its widest exposure ever.
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Jun 28, 2005 08:40AM)
Oh, wait, Scott, I seem to remember something about the term having to do with theaters, but I don't remember in what context. I think it's similar to saying, "Dressed to the nines." and that term had to do with a certain area in a theater in which you could be seen by the rest of the audience so people dressed up when they were in the nines.
I've got a vague memory of this, but I'm not sure if it's exactly what you are looking for.
This talk of theaters reminds me of the statement, "He stole my thunder." Can anyone guess where that statement originated?

Greg
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jun 28, 2005 08:45AM)
Do (did) people throw peanuts from their seats when displeased?

Is there also a salad bar where they throw veggies?

An egg row?
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Jun 28, 2005 08:48AM)
[quote]
On 2005-06-28 09:45, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Do (did) people throw peanuts from their seats when displeased?

Is there also a salad bar where they throw veggies?

An egg row?
[/quote]

That's it! I can use that part of my brain now. It was something like the cheaper seats and people there ate peanuts and used them to throw at the bad acts. Hey, at least you got some food while on stage.

Greg
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 28, 2005 08:55AM)
That just leaves number 8, and I believe that actor who pretended to drown was W.C. Fields.
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Jun 28, 2005 10:47AM)
Good one Vandy ! That was a tough one.
I believe he used to do it at Atlantic City when Atlantic City was THE place to be.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 28, 2005 10:57AM)
REALLY??? I just made that up. LOL. I know WC was a juggler but I just made up the drowning thing. If it does turn out to be WC Fields, I'll eat my hat. LOL


I always keep a bottle of whiskey handy in case I see a snake, which I also keep handy-WC Fields.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 28, 2005 11:07AM)
I just looked it up. I swear that I pulled the name WC Fields out of the air. Now I look and it appears that he really did that. I must have heard it somewhere. Trivia is really my strong suit so I guess it was filed away in my head somewhere. UNBELIEVEABLE!!!!

Now where is my hat?

Vandy
Message: Posted by: Lambertmoon (Jun 28, 2005 11:21AM)
Yeah but you didn't phrase it in the form of a question.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 28, 2005 11:25AM)
[quote]
On 2005-06-28 12:21, Lambertmoon wrote:
Yeah but you didn't phrase it in the form of a question.
[/quote]

True that. I usually do answer in the form of a question just out of habit. I've watched a million episodes of jeopardy. I'm going to try for the show next time they come through on a talent search. I should have done it ten years ago when my mind was super sharp, but I still think I could hold my own.

Thanks for the questions Scott.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jun 28, 2005 09:34PM)
Starting with #8, Vandy Grift got it - it was W.C. Fields.

Concerning #9, here's the full story. During the 1880s, in the heyday of vaudeville, the least expensive seats were known as the gallery (also the "nosebleed" seats, since they were up so high and so far away). The crowd who sat in these seats tended to be the most critical and vocal. Since the most popular theater snack in this section was roasted peanuts, their criticisms became known as "comments from the peanut gallery".

For this question, I guess we'll have to split the credit between Jonathan and Greg.

[quote]
On 2005-06-28 12:25, Vandy Grift wrote:
Thanks for the questions Scott.
[/quote]

You're welcome. I'm glad you enjoyed them!
Message: Posted by: The Mighty Fool (Jun 30, 2005 02:42AM)
Hey! whattabout the last two flags? All I can think of are US, Mexico, the confederacy, Spain, and the short-lived independent republic of Texas itself. That's only five (assuming the fith one is correct)
Message: Posted by: Greg Arce (Jun 30, 2005 02:49AM)
[quote]
On 2005-06-30 03:42, The Mighty Fool wrote:
Hey! whattabout the last two flags? All I can think of are US, Mexico, the confederacy, Spain, and the short-lived independent republic of Texas itself. That's only five (assuming the fith one is correct)
[/quote]

Fannie & Randall... :rotf:

Greg
Message: Posted by: blazes816 (Jun 30, 2005 12:38PM)
If anybody is wondering my answer (post number 2) is the guy the played "Squints" in the Sandlot. He pretended to drown so that Wendy Prefercorn Would save him.
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jun 30, 2005 12:46PM)
[quote]
On 2005-06-30 03:42, The Mighty Fool wrote:
Hey! whattabout the last two flags? All I can think of are US, Mexico, the confederacy, Spain, and the short-lived independent republic of Texas itself. That's only five (assuming the fith one is correct)
[/quote]

Peep this;

Texas Under Spain. 1519-1685; 1690-1821
Texas Under France. 1685-1690
Texas Under Mexico. 1821-1836
Texas as a Republic. 1836-1845
Texas in the Confederacy. 1861-1865
Texas in the US. 1845-1861; 1865-Present