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Topic: Need help, please?
Message: Posted by: TheRock (Aug 13, 2005 05:08PM)
I never paid much attention in Health Class and Biology class in school way back in my day.....

So when I see something that says [B]"with the first phalanx of the index finger"[/B], I am lost. What is a [B]phalanx[/B], is it the top of a nuckle, the bend (underneath) of a knuckle, or what is it?
Message: Posted by: Mustang (Aug 13, 2005 05:28PM)
The index finger is the one next to your thumb, and the top phalanx is like the top section of your finger, like the little bit at the top that can bend over, with your finger print on it. The first phalanx I would assume, is the part just above your palm up to your middle knuckle.
Message: Posted by: Corey Harris (Aug 13, 2005 05:39PM)
The first phalanx of your index finger is the tip of your first finger.Fingers are Phalangies, the sections on each finger is a phalanx.
Message: Posted by: sayer (Aug 22, 2005 05:29PM)
WOW many medical students here :o))
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Aug 24, 2005 11:08PM)
Books written in that time period used that kind of language all the time. It was fairly common English. Youngsters like me had to wade through it all the time in order to learn those precious secrets of magic.

It explains why the newer "breed" is more into video and DVD. It also says something about the current state of affairs in our educational system, but that is a topic best left off a magic message board.

Frank Tougas
Message: Posted by: JohnLamberti (Aug 24, 2005 11:23PM)
[quote]
On 2005-08-25 00:08, Frank Tougas wrote:
Books written in that time period used that kind of language all the time. It was fairly common English. Youngsters like me had to wade through it all the time in order to learn those precious secrets of magic.

It explains why the newer "breed" is more into video and DVD. It also says something about the current state of affairs in our educational system, but that is a topic best left off a magic message board.

Frank Tougas
[/quote]
I disagree. I don't think that the fact that the word "phalanx" has fallen out of common usage is a commentary on the state of affairs in our educational system. There are many arguments to be made that education in this country is not the same as it once was (and many arguments that it is, in many respects, better than it once was.) But "phalanx" is just a word that isn't used very much anymore.

There will always be folks who are more literate than others, regardless of the state of the educational system.
Message: Posted by: coleman (Aug 25, 2005 06:50AM)
I find wikipedia handy (npi) for this kind of information:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx

which leads to here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phalanx_bones

:)


cole. x
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Aug 25, 2005 06:54AM)
Giobbi's Card College series of books have illustations with the correct nomenclature of the anatomy of the hand, inside the book covers. A very nice addition to an already remarkable set of books.
<<<<KRaZy4kardz>>>>
Message: Posted by: Schismatized (Aug 25, 2005 06:01PM)
I have had the same problem. I have my biology teacher on speed dial!