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Topic: The Trouble With Sponges...
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 5, 2005 09:35PM)
Has any one who has used sponges observed that if they are not handled with kid gloves, they end up a mess? If they are in your pockets with other objects, they could end up looking "squashed", or dirty...And heaven forbid you put them in a pocket with a pen! Even if it doesn't leak, it can still leave ink marks on the sponges.

Keys in the pocket can tear a nice gouge in the sponge, and spectators hands can be either rough or dirty, and this shortens their life span considerably.
Sponge ball to square (The first effect I learned many moons ago) must be set up just prior to the performance, or the cube will look like anything but a true cube when produced. Not very magical, at that point.

Still, despite these drawbacks, I love sponge effects.

Anybody have any solutions to these plagues?
Message: Posted by: Euangelion (Sep 6, 2005 05:42PM)
Don't know what to say I have never had that problem with mine. How about a Zip Lock baggie?
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 6, 2005 07:14PM)
Possible.
Message: Posted by: Harry Murphy (Sep 7, 2005 08:51AM)
Depending on the time you have before a performance you could do a couple of things.

First, you store your sponges in containers that don’t crush them, right? If not do so. Carry them to the venue in those containers. Load them at the last minute.

Second, at the venue, soak them in water just before the show. Soak them and wring them out dry (as dry as they’ll go). Then load them. They will feel strange and unusual, especially to the spectator holding them (but it is a magical thing right?). They will hold their shape longer and spring back to shape sooner.

If you want your growing sponge to look half again larger when it is produced do the above.

By the way, these are Billy McComb tips from a lecture he did in the 70’s.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 7, 2005 03:53PM)
I've done the water thing for a few years, it works great, but the water tends to evaporate (Or make the inside of my pocket wet leaving a rather conspicuous wet spot in an obvious place!) and I have to resort to many trips to the men's room to keep them hydrated! Kind of looks like I am incontinent.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 7, 2005 06:03PM)
Sponge ball thoughts:

I have switched to 1.5" instead of 2" so it takes up less pocket room.

I wash them in cool soapy water before each gig to get them big again.

I might switch to non-susper-softs after this bag-o-50 runs out to see how I like it.

For strolling, I only use 2 now (instead of the 4 I used to use).

I keep them in my pouch instead of my pocket which eliminates the
shrinkage squashage factor until I'm ready to use them.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 8, 2005 07:59PM)
What kind of pouch are you using?
Message: Posted by: Daniel Faith (Sep 8, 2005 11:28PM)
I use 1.5" sponges too. Not only do they take up less space but they fit into kids hands better.
I only use water occasionally to restore the sponges but not while performing.
I don't care to use damp sponges.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 9, 2005 05:31PM)
Sometimes when you use the damp sponges you will get a funny comment from the spectator! (Wet sponges are a joke just waiting to happen!)
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Sep 10, 2005 06:22AM)
When washing sponges, I use anti-bacterial dish soap and water. I squeeze the water out of them and blot them with paper towels, until they're almost dry. I sometimes place them in a net, to dry further. I also store sponges in a plastic container that has allows air in, so the sponges won't be compressed. I rarely damage any of my sponge items.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Sep 10, 2005 09:41PM)
Have you noticed that the sponges "bleed " when you get them wet, and after several dunkings fade and lose their brightness?
Message: Posted by: KenW (Sep 20, 2005 12:32PM)
I was given a great little insight on sponge balls. Bring a pan of water to a slight boil. Drop in your favorite sponge balls, let them enjoy all the bubbles for about ten minutes. Take them out and place them in a nylon washing bag hung up like a hammock and allow them to dry. WALLA! You have yourself a springie, new looking (and fresh smelling), spong ball family!

Wanna know where I got this information?
GOSH.....AH I FORGOT.

Magically,
KW
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 20, 2005 02:33PM)
[quote]
On 2005-09-10 22:41, daffydoug wrote:
Have you noticed that the sponges "bleed " when you get them wet, and after several dunkings fade and lose their brightness?
[/quote]

Yes, I noticed this. I don't keep my sponge balls too long. Sometimes, I give them away, even though they bleed a tiny bit, it's not very much, not at all.
One time, a kid BOUGHT them off of me for $3 and then wondered why they didn't WORK :)

This was at an outdoor show. He kept bugging me about getting sponges, etc. Ha!

I buy them in a pack of 50 (or so).
Message: Posted by: RicHeka (Sep 20, 2005 07:44PM)
Boil Sponges? That should make them fade real quick!

Here is the method that I have been using for 10 years. When you finish your gig, put your sponges in a dedicated (used only for this) microwavable container. Wash your hands. I say this because sponges are germ magnets,and our wonderful little helpers (kids and also adults) can be wakling petri dishes. Never touch your face before you wash your hands. Now,before your next performance take the sponges out and rinse them in COLD water, and squeeze out the excess water using a paper towel. Rinse the container with HOT tap water. Place the sponges in the container cover loosely and microwave for 45 seconds (this will kill most germs). Wash your hands. Keep the sponges in the container until you arrive at your venue. Think about it, it's so easy to transfer germs unintentionally.

If you follow this routine, I can almost guarantee you will get less colds and such. As a bonus, your sponge props will stay in prime condition. All the best. Rich
Message: Posted by: KenW (Sep 21, 2005 12:17AM)
PaleoMagi,
Boiling the sponge balls doesn't cause too much fading. Try it. I got that information from the man himself years ago. I do agree with everyone with changing out our sponge balls often. The boiling will make them like new, at least for a few more performances but they will fade a little. GOSH, I can't remember who said that. MMMMM GOSH, sure wish I could remember. GOSH, guess I just forgot AGAIN! GOSH DARN IT!
KW
Message: Posted by: Daegs (Sep 21, 2005 03:05AM)
Lol, Monk the Magician.
Message: Posted by: Eric Leclerc (Sep 21, 2005 10:33AM)
The trouble with sponges, is explaining to the spectator what they are. What do you guys say?
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 21, 2005 10:45AM)
Re: what are they? I find this very much a non-problem. I always ask them first. "Does anyone know what this is?"

I hear: clown nose, etc. and have fun with all the guesses.
Eventually I tell them "well, that's close but actually, it's called a "Pocket Ball,
becuase it vanishes *snap* and goes back to my pocket", and I begin my routine.

There's nothing better than getting people actively involved. That's a good thing.
Message: Posted by: Steve V (Sep 21, 2005 12:18PM)
I either tell 'em clown nose or I do like Mark Leveridge suggested and pull 'lint' off a kids shirt and it is a lint ball. If pressed you can say they are sponge balls. This isn't an issue worth over thinking.
Steve V
Message: Posted by: wsduncan (Sep 23, 2005 10:42PM)
They are little red rubber balls and that's what you should call them. Because only the person handling them needs to know they are VERY SOFT rubber balls. Let the rest of the audience think of them as just like other "rubber balls", and not at all compressible.
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Sep 28, 2005 01:09PM)
Have several sets and trade them out letting a set rest for a while. Don't let them get "raggy" looking. You are supposed to be a professional performer so a professional has tip top equipment, right? Come on they are not that expensive. Like cards they need to be retired after so many performances and new ones introduced.

In my three (4) ball routine I call them "Thingy balls" it seems to get a smile. I too have called them clown noses, but that is only in my ball(s) to cube routine. It gets a laugh when I hold one up to my little assistants nose and one to mine and ask the audience, "How do we look?"

I'd like to say I keep the Hermetically sealed between shows but the truth is they roll around in my briefcase until I next need them.

Frank Tougas
Message: Posted by: Joe Russell (Oct 1, 2005 10:06PM)
I store all my sponge balls in the circular file, my magic is done with common objects and until regular people start carrying spongeballs around in their pockets every where they go, I will not perform sponge magic, but that is just my oppinion.
Message: Posted by: Matt Kap (Oct 2, 2005 01:59AM)
Wash your sponges.
Store them in the box they arrive in.
Load them right before you perform.

C.P.R. does in fact revive them (blow and kneed).
Larger sponge balls get out of whack easier.
Buy new ones periodically.
End your routine with a production of all the balls so you don't have to walk around with the extra bulk in your pockets. (and the fear of permanent disformadies)
-MATT KAP
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 3, 2005 09:51AM)
How to maintain them? I use a one pint container from a Chinese restaurant.
[quote]
On 2005-09-21 11:33, Eric Leclerc wrote:
The trouble with sponges.........is explaining to the spectator what they are.. what do you guys say? [/quote]

I almost explained my routine. I'd like to keep the basic approach/concept exclusive for now. Let's just say the sponges are the same color as the mat and I got inspired by a moment at the clothes dryer. I've been happily alone with this presentation and would like things to stay that way for the time being. :)

I'm sure the above suffices for the clever to know what I'm doing and for the honorable to curb their enthusiasm. It was written serve as example for the creative to find a personal approach that serves their own aesthetics.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Oct 3, 2005 10:08AM)
Yes, I know what you're doing.
Curbing, as you suggest. However, I don't use a mat so my curbing will continue for quite some time.

Nice idea John. Reminds me a tad of John Bannon's explaination that I use once in a while. His clever and witty presentation (except his is for cups and balls balls)
comes from Impossibilia. A fantastic book.

Have you had a chance to read that?
Message: Posted by: Ken Dumm (Oct 5, 2005 08:00PM)
[quote]
On 2005-09-21 11:33, Eric Leclerc wrote:
The trouble with sponges.........is explaining to the spectator what they are.. what do you guys say?


[/quote]

I call them "Nerf" balls, the kind you find in toy stores. Nerf has been around for a long time, so they could be considered common objects by kids.

Ken
Message: Posted by: John Bowlin (Oct 8, 2005 10:48AM)
The first one I produce is a clown nose, when it splits in two, the second one is a clone nose.
Message: Posted by: twistedace (Oct 8, 2005 01:38PM)
That's funny Jonny. Did you guys ever just consider buying NEW sponges? I primarily do the bunnies. I swear I should own stock because I go through them. Working my restaurant and private events, I feel it's best to use a new pack of bunnies every month. $15 a month isn't a lot to spend to keep myself employed, lol. Remember you see your props getting dirty or disfiguring over time, when your new customer sees these props for the first time. They don't want the dirty, mis-shapen ball in their hand! Get new props as long as they're inexpensive. We're not talking buying a new snake basket every month, just sponges!
Message: Posted by: Tim Pressley (Mar 21, 2006 03:20PM)
Frank,
You said that you buy your sponge balls in packs of fifty. I go through a lot of sponge balls. Where do you buy them? Are they cheaper in large quantities?
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Mar 25, 2006 10:49PM)
bag of 50 2"
http://www.theambitiouscard.com/details.cfm?product_code=SBR250RB_red

bag of 50 1.5"
http://www.theambitiouscard.com/details.cfm?product_code=SBSS1.55R_red
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Mar 25, 2006 11:01PM)
All the above are good tips (well for the most part), but I learned long ago, to not carry magic props in my pockets unless I was performing. I carry too much junk in my pockets for everyday use as it is. To keep sponge balls from getting so dirty, and any other magic prop, I empty my pockets before a performance so only my props are in my pocket, and if I need the same pocket over time for several props, I arrange my stage movement or room movement to permit me to pocket other props as I need them, leaving only the props for the trick I am doing in any given pocket. I use both coat pockets and both front pants pockets as a general rule, that is enough for 4 different pocket fulls of props. One pocket per effect. Dumping and reloading can be a hassle some time, but my props stay in a lot better condition.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Mar 26, 2006 06:16AM)
I have sponge balls that I've been using for over a decade. They still looks new.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Mar 26, 2006 10:51AM)
I believe you, but it seems impossible.
Message: Posted by: DavidCaserta (Apr 11, 2006 04:51PM)
I keep my sponge balls in the original box till I'm ready to use them. This keeps them in great shape.
Message: Posted by: Christian Illusionist (Apr 12, 2006 03:00PM)
All the tips so far are very good as to care of sponge balls.

I find that a lot of how much or how little you need to buy new balls depends a lot on the performer.

For instance, I do not regularly do sponge magic. Therefore, I'm going to have every set of sponge balls looking newer and lasting longer than a performer who performs with them at every show, right?

Also as far as explaining to a spectator exactly what they are...

I really enjoyed the explanations presented by several of the members, but has anyone tried working with Jay Sankey's "Earplugs"? This takes a lot of explanation out of your hands. I know David Neighbors uses sponge dice in his performances. This also leaves for easier explanation.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Apr 12, 2006 04:51PM)
Don't be swayed by marketing material. Just because something might require an explanation doesn't mean it's bad.

Using spongeballs and having that require explanation is wonderful. It provides a perfect opportunity to conversate with your spectators, laugh at what they say, pick up extra bits of business when they say something funny, etc. it's a PLUS not a negative.

It's not like you're trying to explain away some silver dollar shaped cylinder welded to the outside of your miser's dream bucket.

For the same reason, earplugs are sort of comedy-ready items. That's the plus with earplugs, in my opinion. I don't use them but they seem inherently funny.

Did someone really come up with using earplugs because they had been hounded so many times by spectators about what sponge balls are/were? I don't think so!

This is definitly a case of humpty-dumpty marketing logic that people fall for.
As a magician, isn't it less likely we'd be explaining away sponge balls and more likely we'd be explaining why we are carrying around disgusting earplugs.

Is someone going to want to hold your earplugs? Did you use them already?
Are they sanitary? Are they real? Does your dog use them on July 4th?

If you have to explain something, take it as an opportunity.

Earplugs seem like a great fun idea, but what they are not are...

"Finally I get to stop explaining why I'm carrying around little red balls"
Message: Posted by: Christian Illusionist (Apr 12, 2006 10:46PM)
I see what you're saying and agree.

I wasn't attempting to give the history of "earplugs" merely pointing out that it is an alternative for those who want a quick explanation.

I myself use classic, red balls.

(I also think that it would be great to include the line about the dog using them on the Fourth of July in a comedy routine. The mental picture one gets is funny.)
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Apr 14, 2006 06:36AM)
I'm pretty shocked that this dead topic has been revived after all this time!
Message: Posted by: jdbach (Jul 16, 2006 09:19PM)
Looking for a source for other color sponge balls, 2", blue, orange, yellow, purple etc. Would be nice to find a vendor that would discount gross of mixed colors or single colors. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Joe
Message: Posted by: Chad Long (Sep 2, 2006 05:40AM)
Just in case anyone reads this topic again, I thought I would post a silly idea on storing sponge balls that I've been using for years. I only do a simple four ball routine, so I keep them in one of those Tupperware containers that holds a stick of butter! They fit perfectly and it works great.
Message: Posted by: Marvello (Sep 2, 2006 06:13AM)
I can't imagine keeping sponge balls around for years, as some of you claim to do. I always like to give the sponges away to spectators - to me they are a consumable. It's a lot more powerful if you can multiply the balls for them, and then let them keep them - "Keep them - I made them magically just for you" etc. is more like magic really would be, if it were real.

I really like the large goshman 3D sponge bunnies- they make nice giveaways to little girls, especially.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Sep 2, 2006 10:12AM)
I wonder where Chad keeps his butter?
Message: Posted by: Chad Long (Sep 2, 2006 01:14PM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-02 11:12, Frank Starsini wrote:
I wonder where chad keeps his butter.


[/quote]

I find that the boxes that sponge balls come in work great!
Message: Posted by: Lee Darrow (Sep 25, 2006 07:13PM)
As to what to call them, well, when I produce the first one from the volunteer's elbow, I refer to it as the "Pinched NERF in your elbow," of course!

Lee "Master of Pun-fu" Darrow, C.H.
Message: Posted by: Keith Brown (Nov 4, 2006 06:34PM)
Jay Scott Berry, in a lecture I saw several years ago, suggested that one take a small size travel hairspray bottle, clean it, then fill it with water. That way, you could "fresh'n them up" even if no other water is available. Just passing this along.
~Keith
Message: Posted by: Carron (Nov 9, 2006 05:35AM)
[quote]
On 2006-07-16 22:19, joe.bacchus wrote:
Looking for a source for other color sponge balls, 2", blue, orange, yellow, purple etc. Would be nice to find a vendor that would discount gross of mixed colors or single colors. Any ideas?

Thanks,
Joe
[/quote]

Laflin magic stock many different colours, they do a purple which is great for not showing the dirt etc.

Carron
Message: Posted by: Kaliix (Nov 9, 2006 02:06PM)
My sponges do get a bit dirty, but nothing that a good rinse in warm water can't cure. They get washed with liquid hand soap as needed.

My sponge balls probably get beat up more from me pulling little bits out of them as I try to tear them in two.

I agree with Frank. I always start by asking people if the know what this (sponge ball) is. Usually get "clown's nose" to which I explain that if it was it would have a little split in the middle so I could stick it on my nose and look like a Bozo. As Frank said, this gets you interacting with the audience, which is good, but in my case it allows me to show the ball around while casually hiding another ball in finger palm that will eventually be split into the second ball.

Whatever my personal feelings about sponges are, I will always perform them because darn if spectators don't just love those little red sponge balls...
Message: Posted by: Dynamike (Nov 16, 2006 08:30AM)
I use to perform with sponge balls when I first started. For many years I have been using the rabbits instead. I use the 5 inch ones in Goshman's "Hare Raising Experience." They are supersoft, those last longer. And the supersoft ones can take up less space in a pocket. I wash mine in the washing machine. After a couple of washes I bring back the color by using color dye. When they had enough I give them away at a birthday party.

I always take mine in my pocket wherever I go. To me the sponges are a spectator's favorite trick. I never know who I might meet that day. So I'm always prepared.

When I bump into someone I pull the sponges out telling the person to point to one. Fifteen percent of the time the spectator asked me what they are. I say "Bunny Rabbits. Point to one." From there on everything works smooth.
Message: Posted by: mcharisse (Jan 7, 2007 08:02AM)
What to call sponges? Lately I've been saying they're the world's first intelligent sponges - distantly related to Sponge Bob himself. Why are they so smart? Well for one thing, they can multiply and divide. And unlike
Sponge Bob, they're, well, red. (read)
Message: Posted by: elmago (Jan 16, 2007 12:37PM)
[quote]
On 2005-09-21 11:33, Eric Leclerc wrote:
The trouble with sponges, is explaining to the spectator what they are. What do you guys say?
[/quote]

Spherically shaped pieces of low density polyurathane.

I have had two different scientist tell me that on two separate occassions.
M.R.
Message: Posted by: Eddie Torres (Jan 18, 2007 12:59PM)
Nerf balls is also the common thing I tell people. As for the shape thing, if you're the type to wear tight clothes and the sponges lose shape in your pocket you might want to try not using the super soft sponges (those lose shape very easily) and putting the sponges in non pants pockets, like a jacket pocket.

Eddie
Message: Posted by: DStachowiak (Feb 4, 2007 03:04PM)
I don't like sponge balls. Audiences, however, love them. Every time I make up my mind to stop carrying the d*** things around, someone says "show so-and-so your little red balls!"
I guess I'll keep on carrying them around (sigh)
When they get ugly and disreputable, I throw them away and get new ones.
Message: Posted by: Leland Stone (Feb 7, 2007 10:28AM)
I love Sponge Balls as much anybody, and wonder if you can use a performing tip I've not seen elsewhere? I would claim it as my own, but as quickly as I do someone will point out that it was published in the Jinx, the Phoenix, Hugards, The Discoverie of Witchcraft...so, FWIW:

I use a red makeup sponge for a finale or a throw-away bit during a routine. This round pad is 1/4" thick and a perfect colour/texture match for the Goshman products. Ring it in during an opportune moment and pretend to "squash" the little ball flat...hey, presto! That's just what happens!

N.B.: DO NOT get all cute and cut a little mouth and some eyes into the pad...like I did, thinking it would personalise the sponge. Boy, did it. When some kid saw that little face looking back at him from the table, you'd have thought I smacked a puppy! Not a good show.

Leland
Message: Posted by: Habu (Feb 7, 2007 10:53PM)
I had a book many years ago from which I first learned sponge ball routines. [i]Now You See It Now You Don't[/i] by Bill Tarr and illustrated by Barry Ross.

I think it was newly published when I got it around 1976/77. Not positive on the actual name spelling or dates. But I do remember really liking this book.

Anyway, I remember it being an excellent book, but is it the best one for sponge ball routines or do you recommend another book...I don't believe I will find anything in Tarbell on sponge balls specifically...although I'm sure there are slights I can use with them.

Thanks for any advice on a good sponge ball book.

As far as keeping them clean I always had a set for use in a show and a set for practice, once the show balls got dirty I would retire them to practice balls and give away the older set.
Message: Posted by: Robert Apodaca (Feb 8, 2007 12:15AM)
[quote]
On 2005-10-01 23:06, Joe Russell wrote:
I store all my sponge balls in the circular file, my magic is done with common objects and until regular people start carrying spongeballs around in their pockets every where they go, I will not perform sponge magic, but that is just my oppinion.
[/quote]

Does this mean you don't do card magic or use half dollars in your magic?
Message: Posted by: ed rhodes (Feb 27, 2007 05:10AM)
[quote]
On 2006-09-02 06:40, Chad Long wrote:
Just in case anyone reads this topic again, I thought I would post a silly idea on storing sponge balls that I've been using for years. I only do a simple four ball routine, so I keep them in one of those Tupperware containers that holds a stick of butter! They fit perfectly and it works great.
[/quote]

I was going to mention that, while I'm at the hardware dept. of Wal*Mart, we sell some wrenches and other tools that come in plastic boxes with lids. When the boxes were empty, the manager was throwing them away! I started saving them and the small square ones fit several sponge balls with no crushing problems whatsoever! They're thicker than the disposable Tubberware containers and free! (You might want to ask the guy at Wal*Mart if he has any being thrown away. You also might want to check the hardware departments of other local stores... I can't imagine Wal*Mart having an exclusivity on these things!
Message: Posted by: Ted Danger (Jul 2, 2007 09:25AM)
I don't like carrying props. I love carrying gimmicks and gaffs however. I use napkins as spongeballs. There are many advantages, but you don't get the little bunny finish. It's a small price.
Message: Posted by: mcharisse (Jul 2, 2007 04:53PM)
I always start by producing them from a purse frame, and put one in each of the spectator's hands, saying "This is the trick with the two little red balls. Do you know why it's called the trick with the two little red balls?" Usually they say no, so I tell them, "Because it's done with two little red balls."
Or they beat me to the punch line. Either way, it gets a chuckle and we're off to a good start.
Maybe that's why nobody has ever asked me what they are. I've shown them and told them and let them squeeze them and no one has ever wondered why a magician would carry such a thing. If anything, it uisually seems to mark me as a "real" magician that I would have such things on my person, together with a tiny wand, of course.
I especially like sponges because I've routined them to work entirely out of the hands with no other working surface, so its literally a do-anywhere trick.
I also use the color-changing ball and square sponge in the routine, so I don't pack it until just before I plan to perform, if possible. If not, I find that giving the square a couple of squeezes as I produce it helps it back into shape.
Marc the Magic Man
Message: Posted by: kammagic (Jul 4, 2007 03:52AM)
[quote]
On 2005-09-21 11:33, Eric Leclerc wrote:
The trouble with sponges, is explaining to the spectator what they are. What do you guys say?
[/quote]

Its ...a...sponge...ball.

No explaination necessary.
Message: Posted by: kammagic (Jul 4, 2007 09:59PM)
Hey,

Just did 2 hours under a tent in 90°f weather. I got there and had forgot to prepere my spongeballs. I didn't have any water in the car but I had some Purell hand sanitizer. I squirted a bunch in my hand then rubbed it all over the sponge balls. IT WORKED GREAT! plus it dried very fast because of the alchohol and kills all the germs too. I think I will be using this from now on.

, Jonathan
Message: Posted by: kammagic (Jul 6, 2007 03:43AM)
Great sponge container here.
http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=216620&forum=34&0
Message: Posted by: btedeski (Jul 23, 2007 06:18PM)
I just use the container that tennis balls came in

Holds the balls, keeps the damp in so they are still most at show time,
no mess no fuss,

but my wife still wants to know what happened to the container and why her balls are loose :)
Message: Posted by: Bill Thompson (Sep 7, 2007 11:18AM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-07 23:53, Habu wrote:
I had a book many years ago from which I first learned sponge ball routines. [i]Now You See It Now You Don't[/i] by Bill Tarr and illustrated by Barry Ross.[/quote]

Hey, you can't go wrong with Bill Tar's Now You See It Now You Don't.

[quote]
... I don't believe I will find anything in Tarbell on sponge balls specifically...although I'm sure there are slights I can use with them.[/quote]

Oh yes you can :) At the time there weren't precut sponge balls, Dr. Tarbell tells you to cut your own and there are several routines using them.
Message: Posted by: jmoran76 (Sep 11, 2007 08:29PM)
I like the sponge ball routine in Mark Wilson's Complete Course. In my opinion, it's just the right length, and it's got a great finish with all the balls disappearing.
Message: Posted by: ringmaster (Oct 11, 2007 01:37PM)
Tip; Don't use sponge balls.
http://www.createforless.com/products/productDetail.asp?ProductID=64807&GCID=C10601x061&utm_source=googlebase&utm_medium=cse
Message: Posted by: Philip Hilton (Oct 18, 2007 12:22PM)
I've never had a problem with them, but I do try and avoid having keys in my sponge pocket because of the sharp edges. Mine stay fine. The only problem I did once have was storing a giant sponge ball in a case that was too small and it took some time to get back into shape. But as a rule no problems.
Cheers Phil