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Topic: Halloween, part 2: The Christmas Years
Message: Posted by: RevJohn (Oct 30, 2005 11:11PM)
Ok.. in attempts to move onto another topic, and since Costco has already moved us past Halloween into the Christmas spirit... I will attempt to do that now.

I have really nothing more to say, other than, lets talk about something else.

RevJohn
Message: Posted by: Neale - Bacon (Oct 31, 2005 12:27PM)
Totally off topic here, but I find it creepy when stores like Costco have Halloween stuff down one aisle and Christmas on the next aisle, but that's just me.
Message: Posted by: Payne (Oct 31, 2005 12:40PM)
Yeah I really hate that too. I don't like it when Xmas infringes on my favorite holiday with all its glitter and twinkle.
They should have the decency to wait and not put out their plastic reindeer and snowmen until all the nifty bats and cool ghouls have been cleared off the shelves.
Message: Posted by: GlenD (Oct 31, 2005 01:19PM)
The other thing that happens when they unload the Christmas geared deco's too soon is that the fall deco's including Thanksgiving just sort of gets overlooked.
Now, I know there is a lot there to take offense to (regarding the Thanksgiving holiday) but the idea of Thanksgiving and celebrating with thankfulness for the things we enjoy today is a good thing and a nice holiday. I think it is a little sad and unfortunate that Thanksgiving is almost completely ignored everywhere now, except for the supermarkets with the turkeys (the frozen ones! I mean the animals that we eat)!

GlenD
Message: Posted by: Leland Stone (Oct 31, 2005 02:18PM)
The guy who arranged the collision between Halloween and Christmas was a genius. Or a lunatic. But hey, it's a fine line. Thanks, Tim..."Nightmare Before Christmas" is my favourite modern classic...tho' I wonder whether the Calvinistic undertones are intentional?
Message: Posted by: RevJohn (Oct 31, 2005 02:36PM)
On a complete side note, of my side note, of someone else's side note..

Payne, your comments in this forum leads one (ok, me) to think one way, and yet when you check out your website, it makes one (and perhaps just me) think something completely different.

Man, you are a hard guy to pin down.

And well, that is strangly commendable!

John
(and as usual, any post, with tone absent, can be read in many ways. I post this with complete sincerity!)
Message: Posted by: Payne (Oct 31, 2005 03:13PM)
[quote]
On 2005-10-31 15:36, RevJohn wrote:
On a complete side note, of my side note, of someone else's side note..

Payne, your comments in this forum leads one (ok, me) to think one way, and yet when you check out your website, it makes one (and perhaps just me) think something completely different.

Man, you are a hard guy to pin down.

And well, that is strangly commendable!

John
(and as usual, any post, with tone absent, can be read in many ways. I post this with complete sincerity!)
[/quote]

So I am a Riddle Wrapped in an Enigma then? Or perhaps someone has hacked my website.
Message: Posted by: drkptrs1975 (Oct 31, 2005 06:50PM)
I agree.
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Oct 31, 2005 09:18PM)
Halloween ... Christmas ...

Memory fails me; wasn't there another holiday in between, at one time?
Message: Posted by: RevJohn (Nov 1, 2005 01:39AM)
Speaking of Holidays...

Kind of like our Bridge to Nowhere (ain't that a fine legacy to live up to),
we here in Alaska have a holiday called, "Alaska Day."

And when I was in Shelley, Idaho going to Kindergarten, and Gradeschool, and Junior High and Highschool, we had a day called, "Spud Day," marked with a parade and everything. It was the big event that Bands practiced for...

I tell you this in spirit of Halloween: To scare the pants off you! Mmaahahhaahaha!

RevJohn
Message: Posted by: acmp (Nov 1, 2005 03:50AM)
[quote]
On 2005-10-31 22:18, rossmacrae wrote:
Halloween ... Christmas ...

Memory fails me; wasn't there another holiday in between, at one time?
[/quote]

Yep, bonfire night, 5th November every year

On an inquisitive note, I just don't get Thanksgiving

It looks like a celebration of communion between the early settlers and the native Americans during a harsh winter. But then the settlers massacred the natives and stole their land and have continued to oppress them ever since, yet this outpouring of faith and friendship by the natives is still celebrated.

I just don't get it, or maybe I've missed the point, but it just looks hypocritical.

[tone is genuine inquisitiviness]
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Nov 1, 2005 10:25PM)
The circumstances of the first Thanksgiving included Indians, but that didn't last, and it wasn't ABOUT Indians, they were just participants.

It's a harvest festival - everything's out of the fields and stored away for winter, time to thank the Lord there was a crop to bring in, instead of a dry field full of dead plants, or a herd stricken by disease.

It's my favorite holiday (aside from St. Swithin's Day).

If you want to hear the funniest take on Thanksgiving ever, it's on the album "Stan Freberg Presents the United States of America" (considered by many the funniest comedy record of all time):

"Whaddya mean, you cooked the turkey, Charlie?"

"Well, I cooked the turkey, that's all..."

"You put our national bird in the oven, is that correct?"

"Yeah, well, I...uhh..."

"And all of us had our mouths set for roast eagle with all the trimmings, huh?"

"Yeah, well, I...uhh..."

"You did a thing like that?"

"Well, the two birds were lying there side by side..."

"The turkey was for the centerpiece, Charlie, I mean..."

"Well, they looked so much alike that I, uhh..."

"Well, we blew it now, they're all sittin' down at the table out there, started on their little nut cups already. Just have to switch the birds, that's all, serve 'em turkey instead of eagle...but it's kinda scrawny looking, isn't it?"

"Well, I thought I'd stuff some old bread in it and make it look a little fatter."

"You do that, OK?"

(Franklin had originally proposed the turkey for our national bird)
Message: Posted by: acmp (Nov 3, 2005 02:51PM)
Thanks for the clarification, I was starting to think that I'd killed the thread.

fwiw I think the eagle is a much better national bird.
Message: Posted by: RevJohn (Nov 3, 2005 03:56PM)
Kill a thread? Here? NEVER.

We will drive the thread into the ground and keep on digging before it dies... and then, well, since it is our belief...

We will resurrection the thread to new life!

RevJohn
Message: Posted by: Leland Stone (Nov 7, 2005 01:09PM)
With a nod to Ross, the contest for National Symbol was not between the Eagle and the Turkey, but between the Eagle and the Oyster, a contest that was decided by God at Creation.

You see, when God made the Oyster, He placed it deep within an ocean bed, safe from most of its natural predators. He provided the animal with its own home, a shell of hardened material, which it only had to open and close in order to feed itself. The Oyster was virtually secure for life, though in exchange for safety its liberty was lost.

The Eagle, on the hand, God placed high in the craggy mountaintops, where it struggles to build a home that, once complete, is constantly attacked by storms. The Eagle must vigourously defend its family from predators, and procuring its food requires that the Eagle fly long journeys and daily prove its skill as a hunter. Though always in battle for its life, the Eagle's reward for this unending struggle is Freedom.

That is why the Eagle, not the Oyster (nor the Turkey nor some other lesser being) is the symbol of our great Nation. Submitted for your approval in advance of the coming holiday -- this Friday, find a veteran and say "thanks" for that Eagle, won't you? :)

Leland
Message: Posted by: Rickfcm (Nov 7, 2005 04:03PM)
Halloween can be marketed with costumes and decorations and parties. Christmas can be marketed with decorations and presents and parties. Thanksgiving can't be marketed with dead birds. I really think Thanksgiving seems to be overlooked is because of who you give thanks to. That makes people upset and they would rather ignore God than think of him.
Message: Posted by: Payne (Nov 8, 2005 01:08AM)
Thanksgiving gets overshadowed because it is the traditional kick-off for the major holiday season of the year. There is also a lot of angst involved with the holiday as well due to the percieved obligatory family reuinons people needlessly inflict upon themselves.
It really has more to do with the hustle and bustle that is about to come than being fearful of having to give thanks.
Message: Posted by: tboehnlein (Dec 16, 2005 02:51PM)
I love Thanksgiving, to me it a religous holiday that is void of all the commercialism that unfortunately has been attached to Christmas & to some extent Easter. It is a great holiday to be with family & a time to allow us to remember just how truely blessed we are as a country & how well God has provided for my family & I through the year.