(Close Window)
Topic: How many types of close-up mats are there?
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 2, 2006 07:29AM)
Would appreciate some info on close-up mats ...

How many types of close-up mats are currently sold today? What I mean is the different manufacturers making them - may I have the names of these makers?

In what order would you rank them - in terms of quality?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 2, 2006 05:07PM)
That's a tall order. There are dozens.
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Feb 2, 2006 06:07PM)
Two of the best mats out there are the Apollo, which used to be made by or distributed by Sterling Magic, I think MAK Magic is the distributor now. The other mat, which I use the most is Dean Dills.

The less expensive mats have a think foam back, the quality mats like Apollo and Dean's have a thick Foam Rubber backing which keeps the pad in place when performing. Both the Apollo and the Dean Dill mats are easily cleaned with some light duty laundry detergent and a warm cloth.

I've been using my Apollo mats for about 8 years now and it still has a lot of life left in it. The Apollo mats come in various sizes, ranging from a round spotlight pad to an Xlarge card workers surface.

I believe the Dean Dill mat is available in one size only.

You can check them out at the Trickery

http://www.thetrickery.com/?nd=full&key=5444

http://www.thetrickery.com/?nd=full&key=6465

Jake
Message: Posted by: Mobius303 (Feb 2, 2006 06:18PM)
Ronjo makes the Apolo or Zeus ...i forget right now but they are tops and can be cleaned in the Washing machine.
The gibson pads are nice as well and a little bit larger than the Apollo and Zeus pads. Gibson brand pads will not hold up to the washer though...they shrink or something. Water will ruin the gibson pad.
I would stay away from the cheapy foam pads....they do not wear well with regular use. They tend to fall appart after a short time.

You could always make your own pads...a little felt or Velvet and a piece of wood with either a cotton or foam core is easy enough to put together. I have also seen Eugene Burger use a piece of carpet as a close-up pad and it worked very well. He said he just went to a carpet store and asked for samples ...they gave him samples for free.
Hope that helps out,
Mobius
Message: Posted by: Dave V (Feb 2, 2006 06:31PM)
That's pretty much what I do. Home Depot has a thick rubber mat used to line wire shelves so small items don't fall through. It works beautifully as a pad under a fabric cover. My fabric is green poker table cloth bought from http://www.gamblersgeneralstore.com
Message: Posted by: Kelvin W Sherlock (Feb 2, 2006 08:05PM)
The Trevor Duffy Magic Mats have a rubber backing as well.
Message: Posted by: Douglas.M (Feb 2, 2006 09:32PM)
Hi James,

If you don't want to make your own, and Dean's pads are beyond your spending limit, then do check out the different "performance pads" from Ronjo (six different styles):

http://www.ronjo.com/thestore/mts.html

I believe all but the silk model have the rubber backing.

John Cornelius makes a portable, folding close up "shuffle mat" that looks like a large checkbook until you unfold it. You can get at Denny's magic:
http://www.dennymagic.com/cgi-bin/hazel.cgi?client=99570920&action=detail&item=005032

As Kevin Sherlock mentioned, Trevor Duffy's durable mats are also nice:

http://www.magicdojo.com/index.php/action/item/id/148/prevaction/pricelist/

Hank Lee stocks the Gibson line.

Dean Dills pads though, are things of functional beauty: http://deandill.com/pads.html

It depends on what is important to you: size, portability, durability, price, quality, and/or special features.


Douglas M.
Message: Posted by: walking_liberty (Feb 2, 2006 10:56PM)
I have Dean Dill's production pad and it's awesome. You can check 'em out here

http://www.deandill.com/pads.html
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 3, 2006 02:43AM)
The ones I generally use are some I make myself. The local fabric store carries automobile headliner material. I use a straightedge, a carpenter's square and rotary cutter to make them.

They are very inexensive, and they have the advantage of losing wrinkles quickly. The surface is fuzzy but it doesn't have a nap.

It has a soft foam backing about 1/4 inch thick.

If you wish, you can glue this to a piece of board for something more permanent. You can also use this as a base for a velvet pad. Be careful of velvet, though. Some of Daniel Garcia's coin work can be hampered by the grain of the velvet, if you do any of his stuff.
Message: Posted by: Sam Tabar (Feb 3, 2006 04:56AM)
Here are some thread that might help you, James.

[url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=141098&forum=2&start=30]The most beautiful Close Up Pad[/url]
[url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=77090&forum=41]High Quality Closeup Pads[/url]
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 3, 2006 04:04PM)
Thanks, Bill, Sam, Douglas M, Kelvin W Sherlock, Dave VanVranken, Mobius, Jake, and walking_liberty for all your tips.

The reason I am asking is I have tried many close-up pads (I may not have tried really good ones yet) but due to the humidity of the climate in my country, many of them do not last.

I am thinking of buying really durable ones - let's say if price is not the problem, what would you guys suggest?

Thanks again in advance for more tips.

James Tong
Message: Posted by: doublelift (Feb 3, 2006 05:18PM)
[quote]
On 2006-02-03 03:43, Bill Palmer wrote:
The ones I generally use are some I make myself. The local fabric store carries automobile headliner material. I use a straightedge, a carpenter's square and rotary cutter to make them.

They are very inexensive, and they have the advantage of losing wrinkles quickly. The surface is fuzzy but it doesn't have a nap.

It has a soft foam backing about 1/4 inch thick.

If you wish, you can glue this to a piece of board for something more permanent. You can also use this as a base for a velvet pad. Be careful of velvet, though. Some of Daniel Garcia's coin work can be hampered by the grain of the velvet, if you do any of his stuff.
[/quote]

Whooo hooo, great minds think alike. I picked up a leftover piece of the headliner material for free at a local trim shop. Bill is right it is hard to beat cheap but even harder when its free!
Message: Posted by: Mobius303 (Feb 4, 2006 05:47PM)
Wow if price was no object then I would order one of these:
http://www.questx.com/tables/products.html

Tabman tables and cloe-up pades are not felt they are suede. I like the drawer table as it has a place to put some props.
Later,
Mobius
Message: Posted by: Sam Tabar (Feb 4, 2006 09:26PM)
For me I'd go with Dean Dill's pads. They're durable and beautiful. Tabman's tables are a thing of beauty too. Rannie, a Café member from the Philippines uses Pattrick Przysiecki's mats which can be bought directly from [url=http://www.pmsmagic.com/]Pattrick[/url] or at [url=http://www.magic-mirror.co.uk/Close%20Up%20Mats.htm]Magic Mirror[/url]. I'm pretty much sure the climate in the Philippines isn't that much different from Malaysia.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Feb 4, 2006 09:41PM)
4,539
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Feb 4, 2006 10:13PM)
[quote]
On 2006-02-04 22:41, Pete Biro wrote:
4,539
[/quote]

4,540 if you count the little throw rug mats you can get at Hancocks and Michaels, great for the Indian cups and balls.
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 6, 2006 02:56PM)
Thanks everyone, I really appreciate the valuable info and tips.

I'll go for the Dean Dill's Pads since it is the unanimous consensus that it it the top of the line. It would also be a real test to see how it would withstand the humidity of the Malaysian climate.

BTW I can't find a link to Pattrick Przysiecki's close-up pad page, his site only highlights his professional performnce services.
Message: Posted by: Sam Tabar (Feb 6, 2006 08:29PM)
[quote]
On 2006-02-06 15:56, JamesTong wrote:


BTW I can't find a link to Pattrick Przysiecki's close-up pad page, his site only highlights his professional performnce services.
[/quote]

Try sending Pattrick an e-mail. Or if you want you can go to [url=http://www.magic-mirror.co.uk/Close%20Up%20Mats.htm]Magic Mirror[/url]. The pads they sell are the ones that Pattrick makes.
Message: Posted by: JamesTong (Feb 7, 2006 06:00PM)
Thanks, Sam, really appreciate the info.
Message: Posted by: Sam Tabar (Feb 8, 2006 11:28AM)
You're very much welcome, James.
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Feb 8, 2006 02:12PM)
Here's a few


http://www.magicmatt.co.uk/
http://hartford.citysearch.com/profile/1977031/
http://www.mattdisero.com/
http://www.comediansusa.com/magic/fore_matt.html
Message: Posted by: RonjoMagic (Feb 8, 2006 06:32PM)
Hi Guys, Pete from Ronjo.com here. We manufactuer our own mats, Magicican's Choice brand. Ours are not "Apolo or Zeus as mentioned above" They can be hand washed not machine washed as mention above. They come with a lifetime warranty. And are of the highest quality. Thansk, Pete
Message: Posted by: jbohn (Feb 10, 2006 12:51PM)
Here's what I use most of the time- something I learned from Larry Kahlow at Eagle Magic here in Minneapolis:

A carpet square.

Cheap, easy to come buy, and they work pretty well. I add some Rubbermaid non-slip matting (available at Target, etc.) to the back with a LITTLE Gorilla Glue around the edges and a dot in the center, and they stay put, too.

Just my 2 cents.

Jeremiah
Message: Posted by: oso2you (Feb 18, 2006 03:23AM)
I made my own using two double thick pieces of 13x19" felt and covered that with green velvet. I like it fairly firm mainly because it makes the chop cup easier to "release".