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Topic: Fill in the blanks
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 23, 2006 03:34PM)
[b]The hypochondriac Scotsman had a (blank), so he had a (blank)[/b]

No clues for now. Yes, there are many thousands of words that will fit in there and make sense. All I will say is that once you have filled in the blanks with the words I am after, you will notice a certain... something... about the words you used

Good luck!
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 24, 2006 06:49AM)
I sincerely hope that the answer isn't illness and single (.gin)!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 24, 2006 12:44PM)
How about "draught" and "draught"?! (draft & draft!?)
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 24, 2006 01:05PM)
... it has to be illness and single! (I think!) ... or illness and single gin. (but because Scotsmen drink whiskey, the right answer is more likely to be "single".)

(After all - what else could it be? I've tried anagrams, palindromes, even "words-that-can--be-typed-on-one-line-of-a-keyboard")
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 24, 2006 01:08PM)
... although, as Tomas pointed out, if "illness" is right, it should be

The hypochondriac Scotsman had a[b]n[/b] (blank), so he had a (blank)

.... and you don't spell illness or single with an "h"!!!????
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 24, 2006 03:36PM)
Some nice guesses, nothing correct yet - that is both to the suggested words and methods.

I'll give you your first clue: each blank represents two different words, ie you need 4 different words to complete the sentence.
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 24, 2006 05:50PM)
..anything to do with the absence of the letter "K"?
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 25, 2006 08:47AM)
Well, the letter "K" is present in one of the words. Not sure how much that helps you...
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 25, 2006 09:31AM)
[quote]
On 2006-03-25 09:47, Stephen Buxton wrote:
Well, the letter "K" is present in one of the words. Not sure how much that helps you...
[/quote]

Not much!
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 25, 2006 12:43PM)
My next clue will require a bit of research: Gerald Wiley, while not the source of inspiration behind this puzzle, did happen to write something that became very famous and much loved that nevertheless is linked to this puzzle
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 26, 2006 03:42PM)
Guess no one found anything. Alright, think of homophonic couplets
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Mar 26, 2006 05:26PM)
Ah, Stephen....Four candles! :)

And therefore...

The hypochondriac Scotsman had a double chin, so he had a double gin.
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Mar 26, 2006 05:58PM)
Or even...

The hypochondriac Scotsman had a double chin, so he had a triple whiskey.
Message: Posted by: dlhoyt (Mar 26, 2006 06:37PM)
It doesn't quite fit, but I thought it might be close:
The hypochondriac Scotsman had a high fever, so he had hay fever.

(And the hints only work for the UK. I've never heard of fork handles.)
Message: Posted by: leonard (Mar 27, 2006 12:18PM)
Stephen,
I'm not quite there yet.
I'm thinking blank hurt ... blank skirt, or blank ache ... blank wake.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 27, 2006 03:30PM)
Well, you've found the sketch.... Ronnie Barker (who wrote under the pen name of Gerald Wiley) goes into a shop and asks for what sounds like "Four Candles". The shop keeper gets him four candles.

"No. I want 'andles - for me forks!" (A fork is a garden tool for turning soil - like a spade but with prongs instead)

As for all the other suggestions - no to all.

Let's give you a few things to focus on. He is a Scotsman, so expect a Scottish-type comment in there. He is also a hypochondriac, so expect a description of a really minor ailment.

[i]And for thos of you worried that you may not have heard of this Scottish word - trust me, you probably do know it. It might even be in your vocabulary[/i]
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 27, 2006 04:04PM)
Credit where credit is due... Stan Alger is the first to pm me with the correct answer
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Mar 27, 2006 05:32PM)
One thing is for sure... he required a period of seven days' absence from work.
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 28, 2006 01:41PM)
Sounds like Steve Martin has the answer too...
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Mar 28, 2006 02:47PM)
Ahem! ;)
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 28, 2006 03:25PM)
[quote]
On 2006-03-27 18:32, Steve Martin wrote:
One thing is for sure... he required a period of seven days' absence from work.
[/quote]

It's finally clicked!
Message: Posted by: TomasB (Mar 28, 2006 03:39PM)
*wee cough*
Message: Posted by: Stephen Buxton (Mar 28, 2006 04:08PM)
Looks like everyone's there now...

[b]The hypochondriac Scotsman had a (wee cough), so he had a (week off)[/b]

I actually composed this puzzle a couple of years or so ago. A colleague at work made some comment about having a week off, and I realised that there were a couple of ways of interpreting what he said.
Message: Posted by: magicjohn2278 (Mar 28, 2006 05:16PM)
Fell into the trap of assuming that the reference to Scotsman was something to do with drink! .. but perhaps I shouldn't say that as it's not very P.C!


.. still think my original answer was much more imaginative!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Mar 28, 2006 05:35PM)
That's what I thought too, John, when I came up with "draught" and "draught." I still kinda like that answer, too.