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Topic: Where's the father?
Message: Posted by: Nir Dahan (Oct 2, 2006 10:27AM)
The mother is 21 years older than the child. In 6 years from now, the mother will be 5 times as old as the child. Where's the father?
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 2, 2006 12:19PM)
In bed.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 2, 2006 04:21PM)
I suppose if you count 0 as ...
Message: Posted by: Nir Dahan (Oct 3, 2006 01:08PM)
Correct george
Message: Posted by: Roland78 (Oct 3, 2006 03:41PM)
Shouldn't the mom be 19 in this moment, and not 21?

Dave
Message: Posted by: magicgeorge (Oct 3, 2006 05:36PM)
No Dave, mum's initial age works out as 20.25 years old. John, 0 is counted as 0 (i.e the the birth date) the daughter's initial age is -0.75
Message: Posted by: honus (Oct 18, 2006 12:38PM)
[quote]
On 2006-10-03 14:08, Nir Dahan wrote:
Correct george
[/quote]
Not necessarily; he could be in the back seat of a Buick. :)
Message: Posted by: drkptrs1975 (Nov 6, 2006 01:36PM)
I don't get it
Message: Posted by: Daegs (Nov 6, 2006 03:52PM)
Give it a couple years...
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Nov 6, 2006 09:20PM)
In Jail!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Nov 8, 2006 11:37AM)
[quote]
On 2006-11-06 22:20, Slim King wrote:
In Jail!
[/quote]

Where did you get that?
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Dec 20, 2006 10:40PM)
She was under age :)
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Dec 21, 2006 10:32AM)
20 is underage?
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Dec 22, 2006 08:20PM)
My mistake :)
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Dec 22, 2006 09:17PM)
Since it's almost Christmas, I can't resist
following up the last few posts in this thread
with a Catholic trivia question.

According to Catholic tradition, approximately
how old was Mary when she gave birth to Jesus?
And how old was Joseph, Mary's husband?

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08504a.htm
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Dec 23, 2006 07:20AM)
Did I read that right? :)
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Dec 23, 2006 09:17AM)
Different time, different culture, different
definition of "underage."
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Jan 5, 2007 11:30AM)
Possibly under a haystack. Possibly on top of the kitchen table.



Or... the father is at the hospital. For a bonus point, can anyone tell me why this is a possibility?
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jan 7, 2007 01:03PM)
Does the hospital do in vitro fertilization?
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Jan 7, 2007 01:08PM)
That is one possibility, of course, so here is your bonus point. However, it is not the answer I am looking for. So, let's assume that no fertilisation of any kind is taking place :)

Any other ideas?
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jan 7, 2007 02:37PM)
I appreciate the offer of a bonus point, but I decline.
I am not worthy, because I wasn't thinking very clearly.
If it was in vitro fertilization, there wouldn't be a need for
the father to be at the hospital. (Not that the bonus question
[b]required[/b] the father to be at the hospital).

Any other ideas? No.
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Jan 7, 2007 02:54PM)
Yeah, in this there is no actual requirement for the father to be at the hospital. Mind you, even in the original puzzle, there is no strict requirement (for the reason you mentioned) for the father to be present at conception.

To answer my question, you have to have a re-think on the age of the child right now...
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jan 7, 2007 04:27PM)
As George correctly pointed out,
the "child" must be -.75 years old.
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Jan 8, 2007 09:30AM)
Not necessarily.
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Jan 10, 2007 11:20PM)
You see, the problem with this is an inside out open ended type of question, Where's the father?
Right now? Then? In the beginning? Six years later???
I'm confused now :)
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 11, 2007 07:44AM)
[quote]
On 2006-10-02 11:27, Nir Dahan wrote:
The mother is 21 years older than the child. In 6 years from now, the mother will be 5 times as old as the child. Where's the father?
[/quote]
Given that the original problem statement does not include any reference to the "mother" or "child" being human there are lots more answers ...
Message: Posted by: landmark (Jan 12, 2007 06:36PM)
Good one, Jonathan!



Jack Shalom
Message: Posted by: Slim King (Jan 14, 2007 03:44PM)
You dudes are SMART!!!!! :)
Message: Posted by: Steve Martin (Jan 14, 2007 03:59PM)
There is a solution in which it is logical that the father is at a hospital. You may not agree that it is a valid solution, but it requires you to re-do the maths...
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 15, 2007 10:16AM)
Would that be "two of us" or I dig a sea-horse? (okay it's a bad beatles joke)
Message: Posted by: vinsmagic (Feb 1, 2007 07:57AM)
Well, this mans father is my fathers son. Who is he???
Message: Posted by: TomasB (Feb 1, 2007 01:27PM)
Vin, not enough info there. Could be your nephew or your son.

/Tomas
Message: Posted by: RKB (Feb 1, 2007 04:17PM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-01 14:27, TomasB wrote:
Vin, not enough info there. Could be your nephew or your son.

/Tomas
[/quote]

Or your brother or even... yourself!
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Feb 2, 2007 09:46AM)
Brothers and sisters, I have none, but . . .
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Feb 2, 2007 11:49AM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-01 17:17, RKB wrote:
[quote]
On 2007-02-01 14:27, TomasB wrote:
Vin, not enough info there. Could be your nephew or your son.

/Tomas
[/quote]

Or your brother or even... yourself!
[/quote]

Huh? How can it be your brother? How can it be yourself?
I think Tomas's answer was complete.

As Opus pointed out, the traditional version goes:
"[b]Brothers and sisters I have none[/b], but this man's father is my
father's son." Now the speaker must be referring to his own son.
Vin left out the part about the speaker being an only child, and that's
why Tomas was correct when he pointed out that the answer could be
either the speaker's son or the speaker's nephew.

(Yes, I'm familiar with "I'm my own grandpa." But for [b]yourself[/b]
or [b]your brother[/b] to be possible answers to Vin's version, your
father would have to be his own father! Now unless your father was able
to time-travel, I don't think this is possible. I don't think your
father could even be his own [i]step[/i]-father...unless it was legal
to marry your own mother.)
Message: Posted by: RKB (Feb 2, 2007 12:30PM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-02 12:49, stanalger wrote:
[quote]
On 2007-02-01 17:17, RKB wrote:
[quote]
On 2007-02-01 14:27, TomasB wrote:
Vin, not enough info there. Could be your nephew or your son.

/Tomas
[/quote]

Or your brother or even... yourself!
[/quote]

Huh? How can it be your brother? How can it be yourself?
I think Tomas's answer was complete.

As Opus pointed out, the traditional version goes:
"[b]Brothers and sisters I have none[/b], but this man's father is my
father's son." Now the speaker must be referring to his own son.
Vin left out the part about the speaker being an only child, and that's
why Tomas was correct when he pointed out that the answer could be
either the speaker's son or the speaker's nephew.

(Yes, I'm familiar with "I'm my own grandpa." But for [b]yourself[/b]
or [b]your brother[/b] to be possible answers to Vin's version, your
father would have to be his own father! Now unless your father was able
to time-travel, I don't think this is possible. I don't think your
father could even be his own [i]step[/i]-father...unless it was legal
to marry your own mother.)
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: The Bean (Aug 9, 2007 03:44PM)
With another woman... [b]Duh![/b] LOL! :cuteangel:


People think way too hard, it's an obvious answer!!