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Topic: Top Canadian Inventions
Message: Posted by: Joey Stalin (Jan 4, 2007 11:02AM)
The top 50 Canadian inventions in no particular order, except for the last 3. The 50 listed were voted on by Canadians, heh.

[b]Alkaline long lasting battery[/b] - by Lewis Urry in 1959.

[b]Ardox Spiral Nail[/b] - by Allan Dove in 1954.

[b]Automatic Lubricating Cup[/b] - by Elijah McCoy in 1872
Fed oil to machine bearings.

[b]Basketball[/b] - by James Naismith in 1892.

[b]Birch Bark Canoe[/b] - By Frist Nations People.

[b]Blackberry[/b] - by Mike Lazaridis in 1999.

[b]Bloody Caesar[/b] - a drink invented by Walter Chell in 1969.

[b]Canadarm[/b] - by SPAR Aerospace/NRC in 1975.

[b]Caulking Gun[/b] - by Theodore Witte in 1894.

[b]Cobalt-60 "Bomb" Cancer Treatment[/b] - by Harold Johns in 1951.

[b]CPR-Mannequin: "Actar 911"[/b] - by Dianne Croteau, Richard Brault in 1989.

[b]Crash Position Indicator-CPI[/b] - by Harry Stevinson in 1957.

[b]Electric Oven[/b] - by Thomas Ahearn in 1892.

[b]Electric Wheelchair[/b] - by George Klein in 1952.

[b]Electron Microscope[/b] - by James Hillier, Albert Prebus in 1938.

[b]Electronic Music Synthesizer[/b] - by Hugh Le Caine in 1945.

[b]Explosives Vapour Detector[/b] - by Lorne Elais in 1985.

[b]Five Pin Bowling[/b] - by Thomas E. Ryan in 1908.

[b]Steam Fog Horn[/b] - by Robert Foulis in 1853.

[b]Goalie Mask[/b] - by Jacques Plante in 1959.

[b]Green Garbage Bag[/b] - by Harry Wasylyk, Larry Hansen, Frank Plomp in 1950.

[b]G-Suit[/b] - by Wilbur Rounding Franks in 1941.

[b]Instant Mashed Potatoes[/b] - by Edward Asselbergs in 1962.

[b]The Instant Replay[/b] - by CBC Hockey Night In Canada in 1955.

[b]Java Programming Language[/b] - by James Arthur Gosling in 1994.

[b]Key Frame Animation[/b] - by Nestor Burtnyk, Marcelli Wein in 1969.

[b]Lacrosse[/b] - by First Nations People.

[b]Marine Screw Propeller[/b] - by John Patch in 1833.

[b]Marquis Wheat[/b] - by Sir Charles Saunders in 1908.
A weather resistand grain.

[b]Pablum[/b] - Alan Brown, Theodore Drake, Frederick Tisdall in 1930.

[b]Pacemaker[/b] - by John Hopps, Wilfred Bigelow, John Callaghan in 1950.

[b]Paint Roller[/b] - by Norman Breakey in 1940.

[b]Plexiglas[/b] - by William Chalmers in 1931.

[b]Poutine[/b] - by Fernand Lachance in 1957.

[b]Radio voice Transmission[/b] - by reginald Fessenden in 1900.

[b]Retractable Beer Carton Handle[/b] - by Steve Pasjack in 1957.

[b]The Robertson Screw[/b] - by Peter Robertson in 1908.

[b]Self-Propelled Combine Harvester[/b] - by Thomas Carroll in 1937.

[b]Separable Baggage Check[/b] - by John Mitchell Lyons in 1882.

[b]Ski-Doo[/b] - by Armand Bombardier in 1922.

[b]Snowblower[/b] - by Arthur Sicard in 1925.

[b]Standard Time[/b] - by Sandford Fleming in 1878.

[b]UV Degradable Plastics[/b] - by James Guillet in 1971.

[b]Walkie-Talkie[/b] - by Donald L. Hings in 1942.

[b]Weevac 6[/b] - by Wendy Murphy in 1980s.
A stretcher for infants.

[b]The Wonderbra[/b] - by Louise Poirier in 1964.

[b]The Zipper[/b] - by Gideon Sunback in 1913.

and the top 3:

[b]Telephone[/b] - Alexander Graham Bell in 1876.

[b]Light Bulb[/b] - Henry Woodward, Mathew Evans in 1874.
Who sold the patent to Edison for $5000.

[b]Insulin[/b] - by Frederick Banting, Charles Best in 1921
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jan 4, 2007 12:06PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-04 12:02, Joey Stalin wrote:
The top 50 Canadian inventions in no particular order, except for the last 3.
[/quote]
Given that the first 47 were in no particular order, it is a near miracle that they ended up being listed alphabetically!

Relax, I'm just yanking your chain.

In case anyone is interested, you can read more about these inventions here:

http://www.cbc.ca/inventions/inventions.html
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 4, 2007 02:24PM)
The Robertson Screw Head....... an illusion builders dream that sadly many Americans don't know about.

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jan 4, 2007 02:44PM)
Tim,

I know Robertson type screws aren't used very often. I did see a show a short time ago where they were building a deck using what they called "square drive" screws, which looked like the same thing.

Why are they so condusive to building illusions?
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 4, 2007 04:16PM)
Hi Vandy,

If you ever used Robertson screws you'd know what I mean. They don't slip or strip like a philips head does. You can take a screw...place it on the screw driver and hold the screwdriver horizontal and the screw won't fall off. This is particularly important if you are holding someting in one had and need to start a screw with the other. As well... because the square screwdriver nests so perfectly into the square screwhead it won't slip. If you are using a cordless screwgun you have to be careful that the screw doesn't suck to deep into the wood. ( that's why they are used as deck screws ) If you do that with a philips head the screw will strip before you can bury the screw deep into the wood.

If you have never used them ... give them a try. The best and most common size of screwdriver is a #2. Usually indicated by a red handle. You'll never go back to slotted or philips screws again.

I just found this on Wikipedia explaining why they didn't catch on in the US. It also mentions that theatrical set designers in the US prefer them as well. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robertson_screwdriver

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jan 4, 2007 04:23PM)
Tim,

Thanks. I was aware of those advantages, but I've never built an illusion. I thought there might be a special reason that they were great for building illusions in particular. But it seems like you are saying they are great for everything. The guys building the deck (I believe it was on "Hometime") said they really liked them.

Ever see the episode of "King of Queens" with the "Arthur Head" screwdriver? It's pretty funny.
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 4, 2007 04:27PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-04 17:23, Vandy Grift wrote:
Tim,

Thanks. I was aware of those advantages, but I've never built an illusion. I thought there might be a special reason that they were great for building illusions in particular. Ever see the episode of "King of Queens" with the "Arthur Head" screwdriver? It's pretty funny.
[/quote]

Hi Andy,

I never saw that episode but watch the show so I'll keep my eye out for it.

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Jan 4, 2007 04:28PM)
The Bloody Caesar????

AGHHHHHHHH DO NOT get me started about the Bloody Caesar!! If Walter Chell is still with us, I'd like to give him a smack! LOL!

Clamato juice. Please.

I will say, however, that Steve Pasjack and Louise Poirier are true Heros.
Message: Posted by: Joey Stalin (Jan 4, 2007 08:06PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-04 17:28, Vandy Grift wrote:
The Bloody Caesar????

AGHHHHHHHH DO NOT get me started about the Bloody Caesar!! If Walter Chell is still with us, I'd like to give him a smack! LOL!

Clamato juice. Please.

I will say, however, that Steve Pasjack and Louise Poirier are true Heros.
[/quote]

Yeah, the Bloody Caesar doesn't sound very good to me lol.
Message: Posted by: jlevey (Jan 4, 2007 09:21PM)
I happened to catch the last few mintues of this show and found out that the Top three on the list of Canadian inventions, in the order that they were voted in terms of their importance (ie. contribution to society and the world...

1- Insulin

2- Lightbulb

3- Telephone

Since these "happen to be the last three on the list, I'm guessing that Joey Stalin listed them in "reverse" order of importance, starting with the least important first... is that right??

I believe that the Canadian claimon the invention of the lightbulb is wide-open to contention.

So many variations on the bulb were developed during the race for scientist to find the longest lasting and brightest burning filament, and so many scientists were hired by Edison to help him in his search for the right construction and filament, that even though Edison gets the credit, he surely did not invent the lightbulm in a vacum (pun intended).

An interesting aside is that I grew up being told that my great grandfather, Frank Alexander (born in Rumania under the name Alexander Foucsiano) was the inventor of the light bulb.

It's true, my great grandfather was a successful scientist, and he was part of Edison's inner circle/team of inventors. And, I am told, that he (my geat grandfather) made a trip to his homeland of Romania and came back with one of the "best" filaments, for Edison to claim credit and victory in the race to bring light to the world in a commercially viable format.

So is the inventor of the lightbulb(s) Canadian, American, or Romanian ??? I suggest it is an invention of many minds and represents the scientific thought of many countries.

But... I digress.:light:
Message: Posted by: Brian Proctor (Jan 5, 2007 05:36PM)
Pamela Anderson and the hockey puck. :)
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jan 5, 2007 05:53PM)
Brian
If that is the way you are going to play, then my vote is for French Canadian women, all of them especially that very talented magician Ursula Martinez, but they are not an inventions, they are national resourse.
Al Angello

PS- Brian how long did it take Kid Rock to get sick of Pamela. She is only good to look at, at a distance.
Message: Posted by: magicalaurie (Jan 5, 2007 07:02PM)
Some good stuff on that list, eh? ;)
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jan 5, 2007 07:16PM)
Laurie
How have you been? I haven't read one of your posts in months.
HAPPY NEW YEAR
Al Angello
Message: Posted by: magicalaurie (Jan 5, 2007 07:25PM)
Thanks, Al. Happy New Year to you.
Message: Posted by: kregg (Jan 5, 2007 07:31PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-04 15:24, Timothy Drake wrote:
The Robertson Screw Head.......[/quote]

I use them all the time! The only screw that doesn't round out.
Message: Posted by: Patrick Differ (Jan 5, 2007 11:08PM)
They also invented Moosehead Beer.
I miss Moosehead.
:hmm:
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Jan 5, 2007 11:17PM)
[quote]On 2007-01-04 12:02, Joey Stalin wrote:
[b]Light Bulb[/b] - Henry Woodward, Mathew Evans in 1874.
Who sold the patent to Edison for $5000.[/quote]
Is that $5,000 [b][i]US[/i][/b] or $5,000 [b][i]Canadian[/i][/b]?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jan 5, 2007 11:48PM)
Actually, if you want to pick nits, Alexander Graham Bell was a Scot. He was born and educated in Edinburgh. He moved to Ontario, but left Ontario and moved to the US. He invented the telephone in the US. However, there is no denying that there is a Canadian connection there.

The Ford connection with Robertson has not been verified on Wikipedia, so it may not be accurate.

The main reason the Robertson screws haven't caught on here in the States is that we would have to retool our screwdrivers in order to use them. It wouldn't be that troublesome for the individual, but major industries would have a problem, especially the suppliers of screws. We already have flat blade, Philips, Cross head, Allen head, hex head, and a plethora of other types of screw heads.

Metric didn't catch on as well as some thought it would here.
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Jan 6, 2007 02:50AM)
Technically, insulin isn't an invention as much as it is a discovery...and an important one to be sure. There's an interesting story behind it.

Just looked up the telephone patent and it was with the U.S. Patent Office.

Now if you want to talk about Canadian "inventions", don't forget William Shatner and Collin Mockery! ;)
Message: Posted by: Joey Stalin (Jan 6, 2007 04:56AM)
Well there are always stories about who invented something and who patented it first. The same goes for who invented the screw propeller, he couldn't get a US patent for some reason. Then somebody in the states "invented" it.
Message: Posted by: jlevey (Jan 6, 2007 09:38AM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-06 05:56, Joey Stalin wrote:
Well there are always stories about who invented something and who patented it first. The same goes for who invented the screw propeller, he couldn't get a US patent for some reason. Then somebody in the states "invented" it.
[/quote]
__________________________________________________________

Joey,

Is that true?

... or did you invent that????

--if so, where do you hail from?

(lol)

Jonathan
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jan 6, 2007 09:57AM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-06 00:48, Bill Palmer wrote:
Actually, if you want to pick nits, Alexander Graham Bell was a Scot. He was born and educated in Edinburgh. He moved to Ontario, but left Ontario and moved to the US. He invented the telephone in the US.
[/quote]
Not exactly.

It was while Bell lived in Brantford, Ontario, Canada, that he first imagined / invented the idea of a telephone. He did much of the later technical work in America, and his first call was made in America, but the idea for the telephone came to him while he was still living in Canada.

So, and not to sound like a lawyer, but where he "invented" the phone is open to debate, depending on what you mean by "invented". The idea was first invented / imagined by Bell in Canada; the working device was invented / built in America.

http://www.cbc.ca/greatest/top_ten/nominee/bell-alexander-graham.html

"It was in Brantford that Bell's greatest idea was born. While relaxing atop the bluff he referred to as "his dreaming place," Bell allowed himself to brainstorm about a "harmonic telegraph" device he was working on. Alexander figured that if he could make an electric current undulate the same way air does when sound is produced, he could definitely transmit speech telegraphically. This daydream became the basis for the invention of the telephone.

Feeling inspired, Bell returned to Boston and began work on his invention. Always clumsy with his hands, Bell needed an assistant to actualize his idea and he found the perfect match in Thomas Watson, a gifted young electrician and model maker. The two laboured on the project for almost a year until a happy accident occurred on June 2, 1875. While Watson worked to loosen a reed that was wound around an electromagnet, Bell heard a noticeable twang, and realized this effect could be recreated with the human voice."
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 6, 2007 11:41AM)
Every country wants to claim part of the glory in any fame. I live in Ontario Canada and as a huge fan of Walt Disneys.. I have to listen to people claim that Walt was born only a few hrs from here. Its a common myth an is never OFFICIALLY denied by local tourism even though its know not to be true.

I never knew Bell wasn't Canadian so I learned something today. I live only hr from were he lived when he was in Canada and always thought it was his birthplace. Brantford ON, is also known as " Bell City".

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jan 6, 2007 01:57PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-06 12:41, Timothy Drake wrote:
I live in Ontario Canada and as a huge fan of Walt Disneys.. I have to listen to people claim that Walt was born only a few hrs from here. Its a common myth an is never OFFICIALLY denied by local tourism even though its know not to be true.
[/quote]
I'm from Ontario myself (born in Toronto and lived there more than half of my life) and I never heard this about Walt Disney. Where do people claim he was born, according to the myth you refer to?

I just did a google search on the subject ... it appears Walt Disney was born in Chicago, but his FATHER was born in Canada:

http://www.ancestry.com/learn/library/article.aspx?article=11289

Also, some further details are available here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elias_Disney

"Elias Disney (February 6, 1859–September 13, 1941) was the father of Walt Disney.

Elias was born in the rural village of Bluevale, Ontario, Canada, to Kepple Disney and Mary Richardson."
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 6, 2007 02:30PM)
People claim Walt Disney was born in Goderich. ( not true of course ) Here is a small example of how that myth carries on..

http://www.disneylies.com/feedback/mailbag2005.shtml Read down a bit and you'll find a person disputing the fact he was born in Chicago and insisting it was Goderich...LOL

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jan 6, 2007 07:28PM)
Interesting. So if a person was born in, lived in, or was related to a person born in or lived in, Canada it is a Canadian invention? Kind of a sad list but I understand something has to replace the lost claim that Canadians shot down the Red Baron.
Message: Posted by: Joey Stalin (Jan 6, 2007 07:46PM)
If you want to nit pick like that The Bomb isn't an American invention... heh
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 6, 2007 08:57PM)
Magic Santa,

Since you are posting in an anonymous form I have no way to determine why you'd post such a post to try to inflame some sort of " my country is better than your country" debate unless its a slow night for you and you have not much else to do. Pride in ones country is a good thing as long as it doesn't turn into a slur against anothers.

I think the truth about most milestones in human history is that they are a collective effort. WW II was won by the allies and not one country, American Hockey Teams have as many Canadians on them as the Canadian Teams do. I think both American and Canadian Baseball teams have the same large portion of Cubans on them..... and the US got to the Moon first because... " Their Germans were smarter than the Russians Germans" LOL

BTW... I always thought it was an anti-aircraft bullet fired from the ground that killed the Red Baron and I think I learned that in a Canadian documentary...LOL

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: Josh the Superfluous (Jan 6, 2007 09:25PM)
At my work we use Robertson screws to build room sets for photography, that get changed around several times a day. They rock!
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Jan 7, 2007 02:08AM)
Drake, I agree with you, but only partially. I think invention is the result of both collaberation and competition (even conflict). Some of the greatest inventions were originally wartime creations. Both the atom bomb and the electronic computer were direct results of WWII. The only other endeaver that has spurred as much or more inventiveness has been the space race, which occured during...you guessed it...the cold war.
Message: Posted by: ClintonMagus (Jan 7, 2007 07:08AM)
Didn't a Canadian also invent the moose???

;)
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 7, 2007 09:14AM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-07 03:08, clynim wrote:
Drake, I agree with you, but only partially. I think invention is the result of both collaberation and competition (even conflict). Some of the greatest inventions were originally wartime creations. Both the atom bomb and the electronic computer were direct results of WWII. The only other endeaver that has spurred as much or more inventiveness has been the space race, which occured during...you guessed it...the cold war.
[/quote]


Hi Clynim,

Very true.

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jan 7, 2007 02:20PM)
Sorry if I hurt your feelings Timothy, please feel free to pm me with any questions about me. The list provided as 'invention' consist of a number, a large number in fact, of inovations rather than inventions. If you want to trace the history of the lightbulb, for example, it is the British who contributed the most to the development, Edisons lab finally resolving the issue. Then there is the phone. Bell was Scottish who developed the phone in the US but it seems that the 'thought' occured while in Canada thus making it a 'Canadian invention'. Does this mean that should research show that the others mentioned thought of their idea or did work on their idea (I won't use the word invention) whilst in the UK, France, or US etc then that development would then transfer from being Canadian to an origin in that country? I also see where it is reference that a developer was having his idea contributed to Canada because his father was Canadian. I wasn't aware Canadian was now an ancestorial reference for hyphination use, for example Irish-American, Italian-American, now is there a Canadian-American or shall it become a third component? My reference to the list being sad is that there were some trivalities mixed in with some major accomplishments. In closing I now declare Dai Vernon to be an American Magician as far as any creation he had after moving to the US because that is where the thought for the effect was originated. I do want to salute the creator of the wonder bra, well done.
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 7, 2007 02:39PM)
Hi Magic Santa,

Many thanks for your reply. You didn't hurt my feelings. I simply saw the post as an attempt to get another of those who's country is better posts started and wanted to de-rail another of those long ranting threads before it happened. LOL

I absolutley agree with your view that everyone wants a piece of the pie when glory is to be found when in fact its always a collective effort. This is ALWAYS the case. I bet any country Bell spent time in has some sort of claim on his genius. Personally I always wonder why anything has to be classified by race or nationality.

Who cares what nationality Dai Vernon was??.. I'm just glad he was " a magician"..LOL

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jan 7, 2007 04:46PM)
I wasn't waving any flags...address those that were. I've not ever stopped to consider the origin of inventors, doesn't made their contribution any better or worse based on where they come from.
Message: Posted by: jlevey (Jan 7, 2007 04:58PM)
Canadians invented Canada... didn't they... or were they French Candians??? Now I'm all confused.


Jonathan
Message: Posted by: balducci (Jan 7, 2007 07:39PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-07 17:46, MagicSanta wrote:
I wasn't waving any flags...address those that were. I've not ever stopped to consider the origin of inventors, doesn't made their contribution any better or worse based on where they come from.
[/quote]
You seem to be getting excited over a list created for the sake of a tv show. If you have a problem with it, or the list's accuracy, get in touch with the CBC. See the link I posted earlier.
Message: Posted by: The Drake (Jan 7, 2007 09:40PM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-07 17:58, jlevey wrote:
Canadians invented Canada... didn't they... or were they French Candians??? Now I'm all confused.
Jonathan
[/quote]

Hi Jonathan,

Canadians "discovered" Canada just like Columbus "discovered" America. This was of course a suprise to the indians who had been there all the time. LOL

Best,

Tim
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jan 7, 2007 11:57PM)
I'm not excited at all, I'm very impressed with the contribution to screw technology our bretheren to the North came up with. There is one person on the list I've known for a number of years and he is an outstanding fellow with a world class company... Columbus never stepped foot on North American soil.
Message: Posted by: jlevey (Jan 8, 2007 06:29AM)
Or, perhaps the contrary...the Contrary, perhaps Columbus "did" set foot on america, but from tha day forth his reputation was soiled?? lol

Jonathan