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Topic: SPY COINS !
Message: Posted by: music (Jan 11, 2007 06:28AM)
Has the scotch and soda become a tool for spying? News report shows a hollowed out coin used to put a small radio transmitter inside of it and then planted on defense contractors. Or did in reality somebody stumble across a gimmicked coin and then let their imagination run away with them?
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Jan 11, 2007 07:07AM)
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070111/ap_on_hi_te/spy_coins
Yeah here's the link...wonder who has the contract to manufacture them?
Cardamagically,
<<<KRazy4KaRdZ>>> :)
Message: Posted by: rutabaga (Jan 11, 2007 08:37AM)
Hmmm... Roy Kueppers? ;)

The thing is, if the story is about Canadian coins, why the picture of an Eisenhower silver dollar?
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Jan 11, 2007 08:55AM)
The same article can be found at:

http://money.aol.com/news/articles/_a/defense-contractors-warned-about-spy/20070111063409990001?ncid=NWS00010000000001

The article mentions that holllow coins were used for delivering microfilm etc. and I think the example was the silver dollar.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Jan 11, 2007 08:58AM)
Makes little sense.

why would a coin-transmitter offer anyting except the sound of the parking meter or soda machine or similar.

much missing in that story. too much to even consider it anything more than a joke.

hope you folks are laughing.
Message: Posted by: drwilson (Jan 11, 2007 09:23AM)
I guess that this is just another way for your coins to "talk."

Yours,

Paul
Message: Posted by: DomKabala (Jan 11, 2007 10:02AM)
:rotf: :rotf: :rotf:
Cardamagically,
<<<KRazy4KaRdZ>>> :)
Message: Posted by: MagicSteve84 (Jan 11, 2007 10:44AM)
Haha....I just saw a similar story and rushed here to put it on the Café. Apparently you all beat me to it.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16572783/?GT1=8921

Seems that the days of flying with shells and other gaffed coins may be numbered...
Message: Posted by: Larry Barnowsky (Jan 11, 2007 11:46AM)
Without an external antenna it would seem difficult to transmit a signal from inside the coin which is essentially a Faraday Cage. I would think that using the external surface as the antenna would not create a very strong signal. Perhaps Mike Powers might put his two cents in.:)
Message: Posted by: Mysterioii (Jan 11, 2007 11:50AM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-11 09:58, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Makes little sense.

why would a coin-transmitter offer anyting except the sound of the parking meter or soda machine or similar.

much missing in that story. too much to even consider it anything more than a joke.

hope you folks are laughing.
[/quote]

These are Canadian coins planted on US contractors travelling in Canada... a lot of people travelling abroad carry back samples of foreign currency to their homes as souveniers. I know I have several. Yeah a lot would get spent or dropped in vending machines, but not all.

The smallest cellphones contain GPS transmitters along with a ton of other stuff, who's to say how small a GPS transmitter could be if the unneccessary junk was stripped out. Hell they could be simple passive RFID transmitters to aid people in tailing someone, so long as they had an RFID reader with a powerful enough excitation signal and a big enough antenna they could tell if someone carrying a transmitter were in the vicinity, and even identify who they were by data stored on the tag. Or they could be audio transmission devices, they're not ALWAYS going to be in a parking meter or coke machine. They will sometimes be in the pockets of people in above-top-secret defense project meetings.

I wouldn't be laughing. Science is a wonderful thing.

Much is missing in that story because it's a defense issue. Security is not an open-door issue.
Message: Posted by: sickmagic (Jan 11, 2007 11:56AM)
Outside the U.S I always have to go through a hassle at the airports with my back up act that I carry on, so not much of a change for me..LOL
Message: Posted by: Jim Poor (Jan 11, 2007 04:40PM)
It's interesting to note that there is a fairly well known case of a spy being outed in part because he carelessly spent his hollow nickle which contained a microdot. The nickle came open, was reported etc etc...

Another thought is this one:

If the purpose of the coin is to be tracking device, one would want it placed in a location that it would likely not be found (in the crack in the back seat of a car for example). An added layer of security would be that even if one did find a coin in the seat, it likely wouldn't draw any attention. Until now of course ;)

I have a scary story about a russian coin turning up in my room in a foreign country after I had already been there, and made sure things were as they should be. I went out for dinner and came back to find a 1 Ruble coin in the middle of the floor in plain sight. Internal security forces tend to send messages in strange and not so subtle ways sometimes.
Message: Posted by: Stevethomas (Jan 11, 2007 09:36PM)
These have been used for years. Trust me on that. The range is VERY limited, however, as is the battery life. Larry, a coin isn't a Faraday cage, unless you happen to attach a ground wire to something that's stuck 5-10 feet into the ground, either. And we magicians thought we came up with these ideas! Think of the Himber Ring, and the fact that it was used for years before becoming a magic prop!

Steve
Message: Posted by: sullivanl (Jan 11, 2007 09:44PM)
Here too.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16572783/from/ET/
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Jan 13, 2007 12:11AM)
Stevethomas says:

"Think of the Himber Ring, and the fact that it was used for years before becoming a magic prop!"

Used as what?
Message: Posted by: Dan McLean (Jan 13, 2007 10:53AM)
[quote]
On 2007-01-13 01:11, Ray Haining wrote:
Stevethomas says:

"Think of the Himber Ring, and the fact that it was used for years before becoming a magic prop!"

Used as what?

[/quote]

I believe the Himber ring was used by people with arthritis.
Message: Posted by: Dan McLean (Jan 13, 2007 11:05AM)
The nice to see the "hollow coin" ploy getting an update. I think in Victor Hugo's "Les Misérables (1862)" Jean Valjean had a hollowed coin that hid a razor.
Message: Posted by: pkg (Nov 24, 2008 08:20AM)
http://www.nles.com/store/customer/product.php?productid=2183
Message: Posted by: TWOCAN (Nov 24, 2008 08:55PM)
Thanks PKG that's a nice price compaired to the spy shop. TY Again. PT
Message: Posted by: MarkTirone (Nov 24, 2008 09:16PM)
"crap, I spent my last one. Can I borrow yours? Are you goign to drop this one off the top of that building if I do? No. You suuuure? yeeess!! Ok. Hahah! FIngers crossed!"

Just adding onto what Jonathan said lol