(Close Window)
Topic: The Aristrocats??
Message: Posted by: Luke Sherratt (Feb 4, 2007 09:40PM)
Hi Everyone,

Ok I know this may sound stupid to a lot of people, and I can't stand seeing posts like this, knowing my luck the punch line is obvious and just going right over my head.

I presume anyone reading this has heard a version of "The Aristrocats" I don't get the ending!
"The agent went mad and said that's fantastic, what’s the act called?"
"The Aristrocats"

I DON'T GET IT!!

I recently watched the program about the joke that Penn and Teller where on, I hadn't heard the joke till then.

Best wishes,

Luke
Message: Posted by: magic4545 (Feb 4, 2007 10:38PM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-04 22:40, Luke Sherratt wrote:
I presume anyone reading this has heard a version of "The aristrocats"
[/quote]

It's the ARISTOCRATS, not the aristocats!!!

NOW do you get it?
Message: Posted by: Mediocre the Great (Feb 4, 2007 11:03PM)
You know what they say, "if you have to explain it..."

This is a dirty shaggy dog story. After you go through the whole bit of disgusting description, the name of the act is classy and sophisticated. That ironic contradiction is the joke I guess.

I rented the movie becuase I heard Eric Mead was in it. I couldn't get that far... about 20 minutes in, I overdosed on the gross humor.
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Feb 4, 2007 11:33PM)
I like the Aristocats too. It's a Disney Classic!
Message: Posted by: dr chutney (Feb 5, 2007 02:35AM)
Bizarre how this particular joke has garnered such a high status amongst comedians, but the ending is truly the least important part. Aristocrats might have meant something more early in the last century, but now it just loses a lot in translation.

The inventive and creative ways in which the families abuse themselves and each other is what drives this. I just wonder if anyone would actually tell this joke as part of an act, or if it has purely become a comedian-to-comedian joke.

Personally, although I'll enjoy off-colour material as long as it's funny, I find the Aristocrats too gross to be funny. Like so much that is hyped up, it's hugely overrated.

And to come back to the original post, it took me a minute or two to work out the ending.
Message: Posted by: Chris H (Feb 5, 2007 05:19AM)
Funny story...

I called my video store to reserve this when it first came out. The woman gave me a funny look (not the "haha" funny) when she handed a lone 24 year old male a copy of "The Aristocats".

-- Topher
Message: Posted by: Luke Sherratt (Feb 5, 2007 08:56AM)
Oh... It is a gross out joke,I just thought the ending would be a bit...better? I don't know what the word is. Its got the whole gross build up it gets bigger and bigger and ever more gross as it goes along then the punchline just leaves people scratching their heads. I watched it with my girlfriend and my sister and they didn't get it either.

Oh well.

Luke
Message: Posted by: bitterman (Feb 5, 2007 10:28AM)
That's the point: The punch line doesn't matter. It's getting there that is all the fun.

The dead Michael O'Donoghue truly walked with the king when he told this joke. He used to have White Parties based around the telling of the joke... Well, and huge piles of cocaine, but that's another story.

If you don't understand, don't worry. It is just something that comics say to other comics that only they will get. Much like the fad, a few years back, whenever anything went wrong, you would yell, '----ing Sweeney'. Unless you did comedy on the East Coast, you could never hope to get that reference, but if you did, it was a hoot.
Message: Posted by: SeasideShowman (Feb 5, 2007 11:26AM)
I think this is funny on soooooo many levels: the setup, the delivery and the blow-off all need to be spot on. And only an Agent, after hearing all these things described, would ask, "And what is the name of this act?" - Priceless.

I first heard this joke back in the mid-80's when I was hanging out at comedy clubs (remember those). It was one of those jokes that was told by comics to comics back at the condo after the show. Love it or hate it, it's a classic.

Aloha-ha,
Cap'n Mike
======================
Message: Posted by: magic4545 (Feb 5, 2007 04:43PM)
Just how many ways can you guys come up with to misspell aristocrats?

Hilarious!

Magicians will never get why this joke is so funny. Living in their worlds where puns are the highest form of humor that they can muster, and where Banana Bandanna and Kate/Edith are the highest form of comedy... The punch line and the usual formulaic comedy does not apply to this Aristocrats piece.

The comedy in the Aristocrats relies on style, personality and personal charisma. It depends greatly on the finesse of the jokester, not on the joke. Most magicians generally believe (broad strokes) that they can do the same thing if they owned that prop or bought that routine. Why would they ever get what is funny about any performance of the Aristocrats? They see comedy as something that can be bought, cut, pasted, and emailed. The best comedians in the world are doing material that would fall flat if it was written down.

Actually, the best magic, in my opinion, is the same way.
Message: Posted by: Stevethomas (Feb 5, 2007 05:52PM)
Did anyone who has actually seen the "movie" the "Aristocrats" happen to be watching that insipid nighttime game show "One VS 100" (hosted by Bob Saget) the other night? If you remember from the movie, Bob's version of the story/joke had me absolutely rolling with laughter, and there was actually a question that referred to the joke. When Bob asked the question...you could hear the little inside joke giggle in his voice. Priceless...and even better to know if he knew in advance about each question...I'm sure he did, but it was still great!

Steve
Message: Posted by: Michael Kamen (Feb 5, 2007 06:26PM)
I have a theory that the joke originated in the U.K. Over there, the word "aristocrats" has a much richer meaning. From my observation, the class system is a bit more pronounced there. My theory is that the joke was originally told among the "lower" or working classes as a dig against the upper classes or aristocracy, a statement about their morals, hypocrisy, or whatever. Would have been very funny indeed in that context.

That's my theory -- I need it because without it I can find nothing at all funny about the "joke" -- so I'm sticking to it :).
Message: Posted by: Stevethomas (Feb 5, 2007 07:07PM)
You're probably right, the word doesn't mean that much to the U.S. crowd. If we could come up with a better word to end the joke...

Steve
Message: Posted by: ToasterofDoom (Feb 5, 2007 07:52PM)
I believed it was a comment at the general inbreeding nature of the royals.
Message: Posted by: bitterman (Feb 5, 2007 08:07PM)
Wow. Please put down the joke and step away from the mic, and no one gets hurt.
Message: Posted by: God-glorified (Feb 6, 2007 12:54PM)
Sometimes a joke can bring out the worst in us--------Bob Saget.
I know his stand-up wasn't as clean as his television apperarnce but its hard for that generation to lose the Full House Father stereotype.
B.T.W. I do think Bob Saget is funny
"Volcanoes can cause the earth to split. Well that's what I read, Well I wrote it down, then I read it, and I believe everything that I read!" -Bob
Message: Posted by: magic4545 (Feb 6, 2007 04:23PM)
If I recall correctly, the movie brought up the possibility of updating the word 'aristocrats' to more appropriate, Americanized 'sophisticates.' If the word appropriate could even come close to being applied when discussing this piece.

My favorite was the female comic telling it the opposite than the original, stating something like "a family went into the agency, and the father juggled, the mother danced, the daughter sang, and the boy walked on his hands"

The agent asks, "What do you call that act?"

The father replies with the longest, most lewd, disgusting description that can be imagined without breaking the sequence up into more than one sentence.

That one was the most clever one for me.

Bob Saget suffers through what Buddy Hackett experienced for years in Vegas after doing Herbie, the Love Bug. They've both walked a lot of audiences that expected the Disney/primetime versions of their milder characters.
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Feb 6, 2007 04:40PM)
Ha ha haa!

Genius.

The ending is irrelevant, although important. (You’re also right about the comedy in an upper class family doing this act!) The story is the punch line if you will. It’s the award for the comedian who can make up the dirtiest sickest and twisted story to a fellow comedian!

Oooh, and remember the clicks. "The Aristocrats - click click."



I used to do a surreal version for lay people, Think I got more of a kick outta it than they did.

Eric Mead performs his version with playing cards on the 2005 video of the same name.
Check out the link...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MNA9oqM90Bw&mode=related&search=

Do not watch if easily offended!

M:C
Message: Posted by: Michael Kamen (Feb 6, 2007 10:35PM)
There you go. Substitute the name of the political party you love to hate the most. (Be careful where you are when you play this).
Message: Posted by: Chris H (Feb 7, 2007 03:30AM)
[quote]
On 2007-02-05 17:43, magic4545 wrote:
Just how many ways can you guys come up with to misspell aristocrats?

Hilarious!

Magicians will never get why this joke is so funny. Living in their worlds where puns are the highest form of humor that they can muster, and where Banana Bandanna and Kate/Edith are the highest form of comedy... The punch line and the usual formulaic comedy does not apply to this Aristocrats piece.

The comedy in the Aristocrats relies on style, personality and personal charisma. It depends greatly on the finesse of the jokester, not on the joke. Most magicians generally believe (broad strokes) that they can do the same thing if they owned that prop or bought that routine. Why would they ever get what is funny about any performance of the Aristocrats? They see comedy as something that can be bought, cut, pasted, and emailed. The best comedians in the world are doing material that would fall flat if it was written down.

Actually, the best magic, in my opinion, is the same way.
[/quote]

Now that is funny!! How true.

-- Topher
Message: Posted by: God-glorified (Feb 7, 2007 06:44PM)
To be honest, I enjoyed the creativity it involved. Even with my faith and what I believe in, I still study comedy to a high degree and while I would prefer the award go to something different. This looks like a lot of fun, just having one joke, the punch line given, and a whole world of opportunities to just be CREATIVE.

Also, my favorite was Steven Wright, to hear that story come out of that guy made my day. I also hope this could be applied to magic somehow: Taking a trick, and completely personalizing it. (I realize that some people already do that) but that might be a fun thing for a convention...Take a cut and restored rope, and everyone go around writing in the plot and patter, all coming to the same conclusion, "THE ARISTOCRATS!!" ---err I mean--"ITS RESTORED!!"
Message: Posted by: Brent Allan (Feb 8, 2007 04:40PM)
Wow, that would be an amazing exercise in creativity. Either the C&R rope, the ambitious cards, or some other "stock" effect.

Granted, a more pathetic level of this is already done in the magic world, as 427 magic creators come up with versions of "Collectors" or "Chink a chink".

However, I would say the one effect in magic that already enjoys "insider glory" status among magicians is the Cups n Balls: So many different variations of the same effect. But in the end, the methodology is not different, merely the timing and presentation. Perhaps this is why someone said that a magician is measured by how well they do the Cups and Balls. (I don't remember who said that, however.)
Message: Posted by: SIX (Feb 8, 2007 08:47PM)
From my understanding the Aristocrats was a high-class family, hence the joke: The dirtiness with a high-end name.
Message: Posted by: bitterman (Feb 8, 2007 10:33PM)
Ding, ding, ding! We have a winner. Six has put the 'special' in Special User. Good job. Top notch!
Message: Posted by: God-glorified (Feb 9, 2007 04:13PM)
HA-HA, thanks for ending the kicker. We were thinking Bitterman.

Six, I actually didn't know it was a family. I thought it was just a group of people, so thank you too!

Anyway, Brent Allen, it was Vernon who said that ‘cups and balls would be another good one too.’ The event would be more of a fun thing, but it might take a magician to "open up" a while these days for fear of stealing.
Message: Posted by: mrmystic (Feb 12, 2007 01:44AM)
Never have so many missed the point. The joke, start and end are always the same. It's what the person telling the joke brings to it that makes it special. The middle part is the point. It's not about the song, it's about the singer. How deep into your darkest thoughts can you go to add something to the story that noone else has come up with. That's the beauty of it.
If anyone is interested in how the idea of the movie came to be I can tell you the story. It was inspired by the late great Jay Marshall if anyone is interested.
Message: Posted by: SWNerndase (Feb 12, 2007 11:22AM)
MM--

Agreed the concept of "singer not the song" is what the joke evolved into over the years, and that's the main point of the documentary. The original joke though (as told in the film by Jay Marshall) was as SIX suggested: a disgusting act and the performers are oblivious to that fact and have given in a high class name.

I love Jay's little touch of buffing his nails against his lapel as he delivers the punchline. Kills me.

SWN
Message: Posted by: God-glorified (Feb 12, 2007 03:04PM)
In contrary, I think most of us have established that by now.