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Topic: Coppa Silva by Chris Korn - Which Issue?
Message: Posted by: Barrett_James (Aug 23, 2007 01:52PM)
Hello all, I have been struggling for months to track down which issue of Magic published Chris Korns Coppa Silva routine. My search started in the 'Show me the Money' forums and although I was given some GREAT resources to look research (including leads by Jonathan Townsend, Paul Chosse, Dan Watkins, and even Michael Rubinstein) my original question is still unanswered. SOOOO, here I am in the Magic Magazine forum seeing if anyone can access the Magic database of just knows off the top of their head - In which issue (month and year please) was Chris Korn's Coppa/Silva effect published. Any help would be appreciated and THANKS in advance.

Regards,

Barrett James
Message: Posted by: Newb2 (Aug 23, 2007 09:00PM)
I did a search for "Chris Korn" in the back issues and there were two issues that he was mentioned in Talk About Tricks.

It says October 2001 and March 2002 includes tricks from Chris Korn. Those were the only ones that turned up in the search result. Hopefully it is one of those!
Message: Posted by: Barrett_James (Aug 24, 2007 12:49AM)
THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU Newb2! Its a GREAT place to start!!!

Regards,

Barrett James
Message: Posted by: Dan Watkins (Aug 24, 2007 04:02PM)
If memory serves correct the October issue was a retention pass, the March issue should be Coppa Silva.
Message: Posted by: closeupcardician (Aug 25, 2007 11:34PM)
Coppa Silva is indeed a goodie.
Message: Posted by: Newb2 (Aug 29, 2007 05:23PM)
It is indeed in March 2002. I believe it is called the Backhanded Transposition in that issue.
Message: Posted by: bdekolta (Sep 7, 2007 04:20PM)
Is this the transposition with one coin inside a spectators hand and one on the back of the hand?

If so Geoffrey Latta had a version in one of the very first Richard's Almanac's and I had published a variation in "Strange Happenings" in 1992. My contribution was to change the handling such that the spectator would not perceive you touching them.

Great effect.