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Topic: Silly Putty
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 28, 2007 06:01PM)
I learned in another thread in another place from someone who quoted Wikipedia and this was confirmed by Vandy who I respect immensely though what could he know personally about such things, the following:

"Silly Putty is composed of 65% Dimethyl Siloxane (hydroxy-terminated polymers with boric acid), 17% Silica, quartz crystalline, 9% Thixotrol ST, 4% Polydimethylsiloxane, 1% Decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane, 1% Glycerine, and 1% Titanium Dioxide."

They don't have Silly Putty in Germany. Do they have it in Old Zealand? What is the point of silly putty, anyway?

And do any of you know my mother?

:clownjuggling:

Jeff
Message: Posted by: Corona Smith (Nov 28, 2007 06:03PM)
It bounces.

And you can take prints from newspapers and comics with it.

Have you lost your mum?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 28, 2007 06:06PM)
No, she's somewhere in Hong Kong.

And she looks like this:

:clownjuggling:
Message: Posted by: Fauna Gob (Nov 28, 2007 06:08PM)
Is Silly Putty just Play Dough?

Fauna
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Nov 28, 2007 06:14PM)
Shouldn't you be in bed Fauna. I told you she's cheating on you.

LOL imagine doing your bear thing and on the name tag they start to write....mu...nope you can't call your bear that!
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Nov 28, 2007 06:15PM)
Silly putty is used by people who can't make bottom noises. You can push your finger into a container of silly putty and it makes smell noises.

M:C trying to be PC.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 28, 2007 06:15PM)
No.

Silly Putty is composed of 65% Dimethyl Siloxane (hydroxy-terminated polymers with boric acid), 17% Silica, quartz crystalline, 9% Thixotrol ST, 4% Polydimethylsiloxane, 1% Decamethyl cyclopentasiloxane, 1% Glycerine, and 1% Titanium Dioxide.

Play Dough is...well...let's check Wikipedia:

"Its exact makeup is a trade secret, but it is primarily a mixture of wheat flour, water, deodorized kerosene or another petroleum distillate (which provides the smooth texture), salt, a drying agent such as borax (which deters mold), an alum-based hardening agent, and colorings and perfume."

Fauna, do you know my mother?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 28, 2007 06:16PM)
Matt, when did you get here?

Do you know my mother?

I'm going to bed.

Shouldn't you be in bed?

I love you!

Goodnight.
Message: Posted by: Freak Prodigy (Nov 28, 2007 06:25PM)
Silly putty is pink and sorta stiff , er, ummmm. yeah.


It isn't like slime that makes "bottom noises", it was inviented by NASA I think or something like that. It is like a loose rubber.
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Nov 28, 2007 06:26PM)
Silly putty makes bottom noises too.

Jeff your mother is in safe place, send five u.s dollars to daxmystic to get her back.
Message: Posted by: Freak Prodigy (Nov 28, 2007 06:31PM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-28 19:26, Matt Colman wrote:
Silly putty makes bottom noises too.

[/quote]

Me too.
Message: Posted by: Josh the Superfluous (Nov 28, 2007 08:05PM)
After you make a contact print from a newspaper, you can stretch and distort the images. It also breaks when you pull it quickly and bounces when rolled into a ball.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Nov 28, 2007 08:28PM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-28 21:05, Josh the Superfluous wrote:
After you make a contact print from a newspaper, you can stretch and distort the images. It also breaks when you pull it quickly and bounces when rolled into a ball.
[/quote]
What a know it all. I'm gonna start calling you the Professor.
Message: Posted by: Doug Higley (Nov 28, 2007 08:38PM)
I knew it 40 years before he did. Im Professor-er.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Nov 28, 2007 09:13PM)
Have you noticed that newspaper ink doesn't come off in your hands the way it used to? Bad thing is it doesn't come off in silly putty the way it used to either.

Bummer.

John
Message: Posted by: Josh the Superfluous (Nov 28, 2007 10:39PM)
I think the New York Times still bleeds.

Distort a political cartoon. Yahoo!!
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Nov 28, 2007 10:43PM)
Similarities between Silly Putty and Play-Doh...

1) a five year old kid can screw up your carpet with either one of them.

2) both make wonderful Christmas or birthday gifts for the kids of people you can't stand.

3) both are more fun when not in your mouth.

4) both were failed attempts at something useful, and hence became children's toys.
Message: Posted by: balducci (Nov 29, 2007 01:18AM)
What's actually kind of neat is placing a coin on top of a blob of silly putty and then leaving it alone for a few days. It should be more or less obvious to you what happens, but I still think it is kind of neat.
Message: Posted by: S2000magician (Nov 29, 2007 01:21AM)
Silly Putty was developed so that geometers could understand topology.

;)
Message: Posted by: Lyndel (Nov 29, 2007 07:12AM)
Way more than any one would want to know about Silly Putty can be found by attending the Silly Putty University - http://www.sillyputty.com/ where you can earn your "Master of Silly Putty degree."

Now there's something to add to the ole resume!

Lyndel
Message: Posted by: Skip Way (Nov 29, 2007 07:51AM)
I have a Silly Putty Egg and a mini Slinky on my desk for stress relief. Great little toys to fiddle with while on the phone or when I'm just tired of dealing with people and computers. The classic toys are the best! In fact, I just found a set of mini Lincoln Logs at Cracker Barrel and added them to my desk's nostalgia toy collection. The goal: To one day run out of work space due to the requirements of my play space. :)
Message: Posted by: Vandy Grift (Nov 29, 2007 08:33AM)
It tastes pretty good too.
Message: Posted by: Hoff Man (Nov 29, 2007 09:04AM)
I know you can roll it up into a ball and bounce it off your little brother’s forehead and then sit back and watch it ricochet around the room for about twenty minutes or so.

They don’t tell you this in the instructions. You have to find that out on your own.

Pure Joy.

Steve
Message: Posted by: Bill Nuvo (Nov 29, 2007 09:45AM)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1s4ZUYgUGw
Message: Posted by: Bill Nuvo (Nov 29, 2007 09:52AM)
Silly putty is the Blob

http://youtube.com/watch?v=yxK75bJLTpg

magic silly putty
http://youtube.com/watch?v=pnFDwMgWe2Q

A rose by any other name
http://youtube.com/watch?v=TX17YT_Z_so
Message: Posted by: Rupert Bair (Nov 29, 2007 10:22AM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-29 10:04, Hoff Man wrote:
I know you can roll it up into a ball and bounce it off your little brother’s forehead and then sit back and watch it ricochet around the room for about twenty minutes or so.

They don’t tell you this in the instructions. You have to find that out on your own.

Pure Joy.

Steve
[/quote]

that's flubber and its illegal now.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Nov 29, 2007 11:22AM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-29 10:04, Hoff Man wrote:
I know you can roll it up into a ball and bounce it off your little brother’s forehead and then sit back and watch it ricochet around the room for about twenty minutes or so.

They don’t tell you this in the instructions. You have to find that out on your own.

Pure Joy.

Steve
[/quote]

Only do it if he's washed lately. Skin oil ruins the silly putty.

John
Message: Posted by: Hoff Man (Nov 29, 2007 11:52AM)
[quote]
On 2007-11-29 11:22, Matt Colman wrote:
that's flubber and its illegal now.
[/quote]

You may be thinking of son of flubber.

I’m talking about the stuff that comes in the egg. In fact, the next time mom and dad are out Christmas shopping, put the putty back in the egg, and stick it in a preheated oven and wait 45 minutes, (try to disregard the toxic odor), and see what happens.

If you never tried this you may not have seriously considered where rubber chickens come from. Silly indeed.

Steve
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 29, 2007 11:52AM)
Here's some more info, from the French Wikipedia:

Le modèle le plus simple de fluide viscoélastique consiste à additioner les contraintes d’origine élastique et les contraintes d’origine visqueuse.

θ = θelast + θvisq = E.y + n.y

où E est un module d’élasticité et y est la déformation. Une représentation graphique de ce modèle, dit solide de Kelvin-Voigt, est l’association en parallèle d’un ressort et d’un piston. On peut également associer en série un ressort et un piston (modèle du liquide de Maxwell)

WHOA! There's even some math here!

Maybe one of you Canadians can tell us what this says.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Nov 29, 2007 11:53AM)
And from the Simple English Wikipedia:

"It has many unusual characteristics. "

That's great, really great!

I love Wikipedia!
Message: Posted by: michaelmystic2003 (Nov 29, 2007 05:26PM)
I WUV SIWWY PUDDY!
Message: Posted by: magicman226 (Dec 1, 2007 12:15PM)
Silly Putty was actually created as a mistake. James Wright of GE developed it, but found no uses for it. Some toy manufacturer saw it, made a toy out of it, and that created my wondrous childhood. Today it has found some important scientific and medical applications.

http://www.sillyputty.com/history_101/history101.htm has a whole history of it!
Message: Posted by: johnnymystic (Dec 1, 2007 01:50PM)
Silly Putty's the greatest!

We have ample amounts in my house, all my kids love it and the grown-up's love it too!
Message: Posted by: michaelmystic2003 (Dec 1, 2007 04:42PM)
I have actually created a bunch of "Silly Putty-based effects! That's how much I love the stuff!!
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Dec 1, 2007 05:26PM)
What I'd like to see is glow in the dark Silly Putty. I looked at Sillyputty.com to see if I could order it, but they only ship to the US and Canada. (BTW, whatever happened to the NAFTA; shouldn't they ship to Mexico, too?). I had already placed an order for 10 eggs before being let down.

You know, sometimes I wonder about Europe. It's not like we're living in the third world, here. But good grief! I can't even buy Silly Putty?

It would have made a great stocking stuffer this Nikolaus. But it's not to be.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Dec 1, 2007 05:29PM)
What specifically about the stuff makes it "wrong" to send over to you?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Dec 1, 2007 05:49PM)
Nothing about the stuff itself, but about some quirks in our global economy.

I ran into this problem a few years ago when I tried to buy some games from Amazon.com -- no selling to Europe. I'm guessing that most American toy companies have European divisions, and most companies with major regional divisions let the regional divisions make the marketing decisions. That's why Levi's cost 2 to 5 times more in western Europe than in the States. Parker Brother's board games run 30 Euros a piece here. Yes, the same games that you can buy for $7.99 at Walmart. This angers me because I love to use English language board games for teaching purposes. (The Game of Life, in particular, is great fun.) But there is a Parker Brothers Europe, and they make the rules, and Amazon and others go along. Same with Coca Cola, same with Ford, same with most global brands. It is not the case with DVDs--but they have their darned region codes for that. Books are so far unregulated. Music, too. I can order books and CDs from Amazon in the US with impunity. But no toys.

So the reason I can't buy it from the States is (again, I'm guessing) that there is a European Crayola division. They make decisions about price and availability of all Crayola products, and if they don't find it worth selling, then the consumer is out of luck.

I shouldn't complain. Globalism as a whole is a boon for consumers. But there are still a few things that haven't caught up with the times. And one of them is that I can't order Silly Putty from Crayola.com or Amazon.com.

Now, isn't that more than any of you wanted to know?