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Topic: Professional habits
Message: Posted by: Orson (Dec 30, 2007 11:17PM)
Three months ago I left my job to become a so-called professional. The biggest change I have noticed is that I have massive amount of free time.
To all the old pros out there is there any suggestions or anecdotes on how I should be handling this? It used to be easy because whenever I was not at work was time that I was practising.
Are there other people out there who put in 14 hours of practice a day? I know this sounds pretty crazy but I have juggling, stage and close up goals. Before I start selling my stage show I want to make sure my product (me) is 100%.

Thanks in advance,

Orson
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Dec 31, 2007 10:52AM)
Orson:

That has to be a little scary, but what a neat thing to do... just a note to say "best wishes"- may you be abundantly successful!

Not being a professional magician (much less an old pro), I can only give you my thoughts from a career of being self-employed:

1. Each night before, make of list of must-dos for tomorrow.

2. Do the things you dislike the most, first.

3. Do the things at which you are the poorest, next.

4. Do complex things when you have high energy.

5. Do the things you like as a reward for completing 1-4.

6. Good reading about your life's work IS work - include it in your daily schedule.

7. Generally, the competency curve of manual skills steepens pretty fast. Sometimes 3 X 15 minutes is way better than 1 X 45.

8. Have a trusted friend tell you when you are ready- you will NEVER feel your "product" is 100%.

9. Allow one year to "figure out where the restroom is".

10. Always revel in the fact that you are self-employed, and ENJOY IT ALL!

J
Message: Posted by: ralphdean (Dec 31, 2007 04:45PM)
J, Great list!
Message: Posted by: Orson (Jan 1, 2008 03:57PM)
Thanks very much J.
Very much appreciated.
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Jan 1, 2008 06:46PM)
You didn't say what sort of venue you played. I filled a lot of time marketing for future work. Of course I did school shows and played restaurants and clubs at night to feed the troop. A lot of time was spent marketing, which included not only finding the schools to play, but planning it so that travel from place to place was reasonable, so we had a larger anchor city to play and find a restuarant or club there to play evenings, then scheduling smaller school districts in the area of the anchor city. Of course rehersal, equipment repair, preparation of tricks (things like making up torn and restored newspaper, etc.) working with and caring for animals used in the act. It filled a day pretty easily.
Of course your venue will determine how much marketing time and travel planning you have to do. Mandarin's list is a good daily routine to follow if your venue doesn't require a lot of travel, scheduling and marketing. Still the biggest work of being a professional is finding work.
Message: Posted by: erichall (Jan 3, 2008 12:45AM)
Orson,

That's so exciting, what a year 2008 will be! I am looking to begin being a part-timer, but I know what you mean about practicing all day. A fever grips you and and there is no choice but to work on magic. I am developing acts right now, and can understand your passion. By making the commitment to go full time, you are er, making a commitment. As someone who has free time in the summer (when I'm not teaching college) I can say that discipline is the answer. Photius brings up good points about spending time marketing. Sounds like that is the work, and performing magic for people is the reward.

Cheers,
Eric
Message: Posted by: Vegasvent (Jan 26, 2008 03:41AM)
Nothing like being your best
Duane
Message: Posted by: Brent McLeod (Jan 29, 2008 02:23AM)
[quote]
On 2007-12-31 00:17, Orson wrote:
Three months ago I left my job to become a so-called professional. The biggest change I have noticed is that I have massive amount of free time.
To all the old pros out there is there any suggestions or anecdotes on how I should be handling this? It used to be easy because whenever I was not at work was time that I was practising.
Are there other people out there who put in 14 hours of practice a day? I know this sounds pretty crazy but I have juggling, stage and close up goals. Before I start selling my stage show I want to make sure my product (me) is 100%.

Thanks in advance,

Orson
[/quote]

great lists above!!

Use your time effeciently

Practice, lists for tomorrow etc, calling people, getting advertising done, research & working out where yo want to perform & who hires you!!!

Well done on the change
Message: Posted by: HusssKarson (Jan 8, 2009 12:02AM)
Best wishes!
Message: Posted by: nathanallen (Jan 28, 2009 10:14AM)
Yes, if you've got the time to kill, rehearsals would be time well-spent. Or drinking like a fish. Or drinking while rehearsing. With a video camera, of course.
Message: Posted by: Beaulieu (Aug 20, 2009 04:54PM)
I don't know if Orson is still around, but I would love to hear how things have gone. Anyone know?
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Aug 24, 2009 08:22AM)
Haven't heard but would also love to hear the continuing story...