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Topic: Steve Bedwell's "In Over Your Head"
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Mar 3, 2008 04:36PM)
Hi all. I know it's been said a lot before but I rehearsed this for a year with immediate family. I finally just performed this twice (at two corporate events) and I have to say it simply kills. The audience is howling throughout the whole routine! If you perform a stand up show and like to use rope and comedy... you should check this out if you haven't already.

It's very well thought out, depends on some great comedy principles and even has a callback. For the audience member that is on stage during this, it's a thing of absolute beauty! To them it is completely impossible!

Steve Bedwell's "In Over Your Head" is a great read and looks great on paper... amazingly it is even better than I thought it would be live. If it fits your style and you put the work into it that it deserves, it's a great comedy rope routine with powerful audience participation and cooperation.

Ok, that's all that I will say. This thing is awesome. They truly loved it (understatement) at both shows.
Message: Posted by: Scott Compton (Mar 3, 2008 04:57PM)
None of this is TRUE! All of you PLEASE avoid this effect! As a matter of fact, it is unavailable..yeah...that's it...UNAVAILABLE. That's right...it's not even sold anymore....so...keep moving people! ;)

Jay - Shhhhhhh!!!!!!!!

Scott

Day 3
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Mar 3, 2008 05:00PM)
Uhm... yes! Scott is correct! I was trying to trick everyone into wasting a bunch of their time!

(help! I am past my edit time limit on the orginal post!)
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Mar 3, 2008 05:09PM)
It is too hard to do and requires five years of practice.
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Mar 3, 2008 05:12PM)
[quote]
On 2008-03-03 18:09, Pete Biro wrote:
It is too hard to do nd requires five years of practice.
[/quote]

Yep! Plus I just found out they were really boo'ing me, not applauding!

Scott - OMG you look like John Locke (Terry O'Quinn) from LOST. Look!http://images.eonline.com/eol_images/Profiles/20061008/244.quinn.terry.100606.jpg
Message: Posted by: Scott Compton (Mar 3, 2008 05:37PM)
Well...LOST certainly applies to me!

Scott

Day 3
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Mar 3, 2008 06:21PM)
[quote]
On 2008-03-03 18:37, Scott Compton wrote:
Well...LOST certainly applies to me!

Scott

Day 3
[/quote]

lol! Me too! :)
Message: Posted by: Mind_Magic (Jun 5, 2008 04:25PM)
I agree with you, the effect is good, but I think it’s difficult to combine it with Fiber Optics due it shows the secret to the trick.

Question: Does anyone join this effect with another Rope routine?
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jun 5, 2008 05:52PM)
Jay
Do you belong to SAM 4, IBM 6, or go to Super Sunday? If so I'd like to get together with you to discuss rope magic.
Message: Posted by: Tim Hannig (Jun 7, 2008 09:30PM)
I have the manuscript, and have always wanted to see this performed.

I don't think Steve Bedwell has a dvd with this on it.

Is there any footage online of this routine?
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jun 18, 2008 04:42PM)
I doubt that bedwell would want footage of this out there. I've seen it performed once but it was done with a stooge and was not that great. ok though.
Message: Posted by: Doug Arden (Jun 18, 2008 06:34PM)
Steve himself told me that he has no footage of his performance of the trick.
Message: Posted by: Andre Hagen (Jun 22, 2008 11:08AM)
It's not hard to imagine a performance of this great routine from Steve's booklet. If you've ever watched a youtube video of Al Flosso doing the Miser's Dream with a kid onstage, that's close to what it is like. I love it but it's too over the top for my persona.
Message: Posted by: puggo (Jun 25, 2008 06:02PM)
Dear all,
I perform a rope routine as a close up act, and have a booking to do close up followed by a bit of stage / parlour. Will performing a rope routine with elements of Fiber Optics (with other influences)during the close up spoil a performance of 'In over your head' later?
The usual requirement of enough practice and suitable presentation would obviously be met before I did perform something based on this.
Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Sealegs (Jun 29, 2008 08:57PM)
Puggo; My intuitive answer to your question would be; yes.

I think it more likely than not that the one rope routine would tread on the toes of the other. However, even if the answer is not; yes, but; maybe, why risk it?

Steve's 'In Over Your Head' routine is, (IMO) excellent but there are a thousand other effects you could turn your attention to where the possibility of this toe treading would be completely avoided.

Frank, you don't say whether or not it was Steve Bedwell you saw performing this routine. When I 1st read your post it sounded like that's what you meant. But on 2nd reading you don't actually say that and given that Steve doesn't stooge anyone for this routine, (in fact stooging it is a terrible idea. You have nothing to gain from it and stand to loose the whole soul of the routine if anyone was to suspect that what they were watching was being faked) and he gets a great reaction from it. I'm assuming therefore that you saw someone who doesn't understand what the routine is about perform it badly.

I'm pretty sure if I was to pick up some rope now and go out and perform Fibre Optics in my next show it would be painful to watch. Why? because I've never learnt the moves in the routine.... and I've certainly not worked on scripting and staging it. However me going out and performing Fibre Optics wouldn't make it a bad routine it would just make me a bad performer.

Of course if you have reasons other than a bad performance to dislike Steve's routine that's fair enough. I think it's a brilliantly constructed masterful piece of theatre and so it would be very interesting for me to hear a differing opinion.

Neal.
Message: Posted by: puggo (Jun 30, 2008 03:35PM)
Neal,
Thanks for your comments. I think that I will go ahead and buy the routine, although probably won't have practiced it enough to be proficient, and to have adapted it to my style. I guess I'll be doing something else for the 'parlour' performance instead.
I understand there could be several reasons why there is not footage of this routine, but I would still love to see it, either on DVD or live, as I am a rope fan.
Puggo
Message: Posted by: TheAmbitiousCard (Jun 30, 2008 03:49PM)
Nope. It was not Bedwell that I saw. someone different. It wasn't poorly done but a real spectator would have made it much better.
Message: Posted by: Sealegs (Jul 7, 2008 05:57PM)
[quote]
On 2008-06-30 16:49, Frank Starsini wrote:
...... but a real spectator would have made it much better.
[/quote]

Frank; regarding this point.... I'm sure you're right.
Message: Posted by: graywolf (Jul 20, 2008 04:45PM)
Doctor Bedwell is a terific performer.He won many awards with his cassette act..Cordially,Howard
Message: Posted by: defconskylude (Aug 21, 2009 12:29PM)
I just got this manuscript the other day. sounds like a GEM. I don't do stage but more of close up and street magic. I don't want to carry scissors with me but what about using a pocket knife or a multi-tool that has small scissors built in to cut the rope?

I'm already doing paper balls over the head and sponge ball routines using crumpled bills and napkins
Message: Posted by: manal (Aug 21, 2009 08:34PM)
Ya need big ears for this.
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Aug 22, 2009 03:50AM)
I think Steve's routine is one of the finest comedy rope routines ever created. I am a huge fan of his, and of this very clever and commercial routine.
Message: Posted by: Floyd Collins (Aug 22, 2009 07:18AM)
Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.
Message: Posted by: defconskylude (Aug 24, 2009 06:12PM)
So has anyone been able to perform this in a non stage performance using a swiss pocket knife?

Also what about performing this using a shoe lace?

I'd like to incorporate this routine along with my ring and string.
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Aug 24, 2009 08:57PM)
It would not play well with a shoe lace.
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Aug 25, 2009 10:32AM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-22 08:18, aceofharts wrote:
Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.
[/quote]

I agree 100%
Two of my favorite routines to perform!
Message: Posted by: parmenion (Aug 26, 2009 10:24AM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-24 19:12, defconskylude wrote:
So has anyone been able to perform this in a non stage performance using a swiss pocket knife?

Also what about performing this using a shoe lace?

I'd like to incorporate this routine along with my ring and string.
[/quote]

Are you kidding ?
I hope so,if not it's totally stupid
Message: Posted by: Mac_Stone (Aug 26, 2009 07:52PM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-25 11:32, Jay Buchanan wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-08-22 08:18, aceofharts wrote:
Pop yours is right up there with Steve's.
[/quote]

I agree 100%
Two of my favorite routines to perform!
[/quote]

I think the two could play well together. After you pull one over on your spectator you can pull on over on yourself.
Message: Posted by: Corbett (Sep 3, 2009 09:22AM)
Where is this routine available?
Message: Posted by: Doug Arden (Sep 3, 2009 10:54AM)
[quote]
On 2009-09-03 10:22, Corbett wrote:
Where is this routine available?
[/quote]

http://www.magicproshop.com/over-your-head-booklet-bedwell-p-194.html
Message: Posted by: Corbett (Sep 3, 2009 12:21PM)
Thanks much.
Message: Posted by: Michel Fouche (Sep 21, 2010 06:11AM)
In the manuscript Steve uses a female volunteer. Is anyone out there doing it regularly with a male volunteer? Is there much difference in compliance?
Message: Posted by: Sealegs (Sep 23, 2010 04:28AM)
Michel,

Obviously the dynamic for any effect will be different between two guys, and a guy and a girl, or a girl and a girl. But there's no reason in practice why all the elements of the routine shouldn't play equally as well.

No parts of the structure routine are reliant in any way on the sex of the participants.

Cheers Neal
Message: Posted by: Michel Fouche (Jun 7, 2012 10:59PM)
Hey look, I'm bringing this thread back AGAIN.

For those who perform this regularly, how to you avoid looking or feeling stiff to the volunteer? Obviously (without giving anything away) there are limitations on your movement and I find this makes me interact with the volunteer in a slightly less than natural manner. Less eye contact for instance.
Message: Posted by: Jay Buchanan (Jun 15, 2012 01:32AM)
[quote]
On 2012-06-07 23:59, Michel Fouche wrote:
Hey look, I'm bringing this thread back AGAIN.

For those who perform this regularly, how to you avoid looking or feeling stiff to the volunteer? Obviously (without giving anything away) there are limitations on your movement and I find this makes me interact with the volunteer in a slightly less than natural manner. Less eye contact for instance.
[/quote]

I find that they are usually so worried about how THEY look and act, that how I look and act flies right past them. The applause cue bit puts the focus on them, and they know that they become the star every time they do it, and that usually trumps any other thought they might have while up there with you. Another thing you could do (I've done this and it works) is to do a quick little interview with the spectator once they arrive on stage and you position them. A few questions amongst friends in a very casual way, only do it exactly as if you had the **** in your *** already, only you don't yet.

I usually have them stand in position for the routine, I ask them if they're nervous and however they answer I stand right next to them (also in position for the routine) and I look straight forward into the audience as I lean left and slowly tell the spectator "I just picture them all their underwear, it get's me through the show!" As I say this I smile awkwardly at the audience, I glance to the left as if I am "loaded" for the routine and I say, "you're doing it right now aren't you? Picturing them in their underwear?" This always gets a laugh and as I say it I am glancing back and forth from the audience to the spectator. And then I will usually do a loud stage whisper (so everyone can hear me) as I glance to the spectator, something like... "Don't worry, this is going to be comepletly amazing... for you... not for them, they'll all see how this is done, but for you, it's going to be mind boggling!" At which point I go right into explaining that little tidbit, per the manuscript. The whole time I am saying this stuff, I am leaning a bit left and glancing between them and the audience with a side-eye glance. By the time I actually HAVE to do that stance/glance, it's just par for the course.

This routine remains one of my favorites. I am strongly considering heading out someday soon and trying my hand at some busking because I truly LOVE the atmosphere of the streets, and if I do.. "In over your head" will very likely be a feature of my act. I know this will be a bit riskier than on a platform or stage, as I'll likely be sorrounded quite a bit, but I have already done this surrounded several times and it didn't seem to hurt the strength.

Such an amazingly well thought out routine, in my opinion. Kudos again to Doctor Bedwell for sharing this incredible work of art.
Message: Posted by: Michel Fouche (Jun 16, 2012 04:23AM)
Thanks heaps. I guess I notice the difference more than the volunteer ever would. I love the underwear bit, too.
Message: Posted by: Sealegs (Jun 22, 2012 08:25AM)
Michel, you have pointed up a presentational aspect of this routine that definitely needs to be considered and worked into one's blocking of the effect. The way the routine is constructed kind of dictates how you stand and address the spectator so there really is no issue other then those invented/percieved by the performer. However it is perfectly reasonable to see that the performer new to this routine might feel that their interactions with the assisting spectator are not as natural as they might be but for the limitations put on the performer by the workings of the routine. However these limitations are noticed by the performer only.... the routine is so constructed that the assisting spectator, during these moments of more limited eye contact is largely following the performer's instructions and actions.

Jay's general suggestions provide an excellent way to approach how to lessen one's feeling of potential discomfort in how one interacts with the spectator on stage during the 'set up' moments.. I say, 'potential' because in reality the assisting spectator is, as Jay suggested, generally oblivious to the concerns a performer new to this routine might feel. But, addressing the assisting spectator early in the routine in the same manner that you'll being address them in the middle of the routine can certainly help set, in the assisting spectators mind, the look of your interactions with them and as a result this can make the performer feel more comfortable.

In essence what I'm suggesting Michel is that your concerns are understandable and make sense... but within the routine these are concern's that are not an operational or methodological issue. However feeling comfortable with a method is important and to that end the advice Jay offers, in general terms, can help put a performer's mind in a more comfortable place.

Do the routine a few times and you'll find there really is no issue with the spectator on stage.

In fact the main blocking to address, in my opinion, is not the spectator on stage but it's is letting the audience on the far side spectator's side of the stage get clear view and understanding of what is going on. This can be achieved by moving slightly downstage of the assisting spectator and then turning slightly to address that section of the crowd. It really is a question of just a pace or half a pace downstage of the assisting spectator.

These are the kinds of things that, if you have any sense of stage awareness, will happen more or less automatically. However it's always a good idea to think through these aspects of a performance before hand. The patter, blocking, staging, choreography etc of a routine is as important as the actual handling and method. Equal consideration needs to be given to each of these elements for the whole to become more than the sum of the individual parts. This is true of any routine not just Steve's 'In Over Your Head'.

So, at the risk of sounding terribly patronising... well done for asking the question. Such questions about the details of a performance are important and are unfortunately often overlooked.
Message: Posted by: Damian (Jul 6, 2012 10:48AM)
Any tips on where I can find this manuscript? Seems to be out of stock everywhere I look.
Thanks,
Damian
Message: Posted by: Michel Fouche (Jul 7, 2012 01:42AM)
Ebay
Message: Posted by: pwolverine (Sep 29, 2020 09:01PM)
Anyone know of this is available anywhere anymore? Doesn’t even seem to be on eBay.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Sep 30, 2020 12:50PM)
I did a search for Steve Bedwell several months ago, he is out of magic and went a whole different direction lecturing. This effect is no longer provided by Steve, it is only available second hand. You find it where you can find it.
Message: Posted by: pwolverine (Sep 30, 2020 07:22PM)
[quote]On Sep 30, 2020, Bill Hegbli wrote:
I did a search for Steve Bedwell several months ago, he is out of magic and went a whole different direction lecturing. This effect is no longer provided by Steve, it is only available second hand. You find it where you can find it. [/quote]

Cool, any hint to where you can find it? Been searching around for a little while now.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Sep 30, 2020 10:08PM)
Pwolverine, No idea at all, If I had I would already have it. Try the Let's Make a deal section of the Café.

It seem Mr. Bedwell wants to stay hidden, as I went back to the website where he was doing a lecture a day or two later, (nothing to do with magic) and it was removed. Also check eBay, and Amazon regularly.
Message: Posted by: imgic (Mar 4, 2021 05:09PM)
I have a copy I bought off eBay a few years ago I'd be willing to part with. If anyone's really interested PM.