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Topic: Money??
Message: Posted by: morpheis91 (Mar 31, 2008 04:45AM)
Are most magicians (close-up) part-time or full time? What is the money like for a close-up magician? And where is the "GOOD" money at? Is it with opening up a business, or just performing at gigs?
Message: Posted by: pepka (Mar 31, 2008 05:46AM)
If you are working just as a close-up guy (no stage show, no kids shows), it's important to have a regular restaurant/bar type gig. Not just for the money, which can really vary depending on your market, it's more important to get somewhere where people can see you that will want to hire you for other events. I work 2 restaurants a week. I'd say about 50% of my other bookings, like Weddings, corporate stuff, and cocktail parties, all START there. Someone who sees me at the restaurant may pass my card on to the host of the event.
I just started at a Texas Roadhouse 3 weeks ago and have booked 2 gigs from there already. One retirement party that was this past weekend, and one for an art gallery reception. You may also want to look into working with an agency. I work with 2, and I get quite a bit of strolling work from them as well.
Message: Posted by: morpheis91 (Mar 31, 2008 06:11AM)
Wow, I just noticed you are not that far from me. Have you been to Hocus Pocus in Philadelphia? I worked there this past summer.
Message: Posted by: morpheis91 (Mar 31, 2008 06:13AM)
Thank you for the advice.
Message: Posted by: Hansel (Mar 31, 2008 04:51PM)
Yep, I don't work in a restaurant because I like the constant Meat Aroma!!! I like the restaurant work because it is a "paid" promotion...the people go and see your work, enjoy it, talk about it with other friends, and like it for his next party!!!! Like Pepka, many of my other gigs come from Table Hopping.
Thanks,
Hansel!
Message: Posted by: derrick (Apr 1, 2008 11:39AM)
I think for most table hoppers, it is a combination of the two. Working a restaurant gig still means you are probably making more per hour than the manager, but you're only doing it "typically" for two or three hours an evening. It is also a great way to get paid to advertise the fact you are available for other venues, be it b-day parties, after dinner, etc., etc.

Derrick
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Apr 1, 2008 12:11PM)
I think if you want to make a living at magic, you need to pick a field (close up, illusions, comedy clubs, etc.) and be ORIGINAL AND HARD WORKING. You need to stand out from the herd. You need to work at all aspects, marketing, selling, reliability and, above all, be LIKEABLE AND SKILLED.
Message: Posted by: state (Apr 1, 2008 01:01PM)
I pretend to be a Full Time Magician. I don't get paid doing magic - so I compensate by not doing anything at my real job. :)
Message: Posted by: derrick (Apr 1, 2008 01:47PM)
OK Pete,

If you don't like talking to people and could care less about their lives and their interests, you don't wear a watch because time just isn't that important to you and your idea of marketing is sitting by the phone waiting for it to ring, then I'm pretty sure it isn't going to matter how original or hard working you are.
Message: Posted by: Hansel (Apr 1, 2008 02:04PM)
[quote]
On 2008-04-01 12:39, derrick wrote:
Working a restaurant gig still means you are probably making more per hour than the manager, but you're only doing it "typically" for two or three hours an evening. [/quote]

THAT'S A VERY FUNNY LINE IN THE PRINCIPLE, BUT VERY REAL IF YOU THINK ABOUT IT!!!!
Thanks,
Hansel!
Message: Posted by: morpheis91 (Apr 4, 2008 02:57PM)
[quote]
On 2008-04-01 13:11, Pete Biro wrote:
I think if you want to make a living at magic, you need to pick a field (close up, illusions, comedy clubs, etc.) and be ORIGINAL AND HARD WORKING. You need to stand out from the herd. You need to work at all aspects, marketing, selling, reliability and, above all, be LIKEABLE AND SKILLED.
[/quote]
WOW, you are absolutely right. I have just begun taking all of these steps, so I guess that means I'm on the right track. Yes, this is what I am going to do, everything I can with close-up.