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Topic: 4 most famous magicians before 1970
Message: Posted by: jay leslie (Jul 14, 2008 12:03PM)
This is a popularity contest!!!!! Please list the 4 or 5 most POPULAR magicians of yesteryear

I'll start - - - Houdini, Keller, Thurston, Blackstone, Dante

 You may use the same popular magicians (above) - OR - list your own popular magicians

4 or 5 most popular magicians..... are?

.
Message: Posted by: Michael Baker (Jul 14, 2008 01:00PM)
Of the above, Dante was probably lesser known in the US. I would therefore substitute Alexander Herrmann.

This list however, only accounts for a modified selction of the past 125 years or so, and is geographically biased. Names like Robert Houdin, Devant, Maskelyne, Pinetti, Hofzinser, John Henry Anderson, etc. would surely make the list had their history stayed in the public's interest. For the same reason, most of the names on the above list would not be there, had more current names be allowed, and names like Copperfield and Henning are actually today being forgotten by younger people who only know of Criss Angel, David Blaine, etc.
Message: Posted by: gadfly3d (Jul 14, 2008 01:19PM)
Mark Wilson would fit that time period

Gil Scott
Message: Posted by: mark2004 (Jul 15, 2008 03:36PM)
The answer to this is surely going to vary a lot depending on how you define the question. Is it about the most famous magicians throughout the history of magic up to 1970? Or are we talking about just a decade or two prior to 1970? And, of course, views will probably differ from one country to another.

As a Brit who was still in his youth in 1970 I would say the most famous magicians I was aware of at the time had to include David Nixon, Ali Bongo, and Robert Harbin.

And if you were to extend the cutoff date to 1980 then the British list would be headed by Paul Daniels, whose impact on TV presentation of magic on our side of the Atlantic was as significant as that of Copperfield and Mark Wilson in the USA.

Obviously if you extend the scope back across all of magic history then you need to consider many great names including John Nevil Maskelyne, David Devant, Will Goldston, PT Selbit, and Le Roy, Talma and Bosco.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 16, 2008 04:30AM)
Mark Wilson performed for more people before 1970 than any other magician in the world. He was the first magician to have a nationally televised series of specials. He laid the groundwork for all who came later, on this side of the pond and the other, as well.

Houdini, Thurston and Kellar would probably be the best known in the States, other than Wilson.
Message: Posted by: Father Photius (Jul 16, 2008 11:49AM)
Blackstone, Keller, Thurston, Wilson
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 17, 2008 05:19AM)
I could go with that.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Jul 17, 2008 10:26AM)
Why is the greatest , Fred Kaps not on anyone's list ? Would also include Tony Slydini as well as Cardini and Ed Marlo. Strange no one even mentions them.
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Jul 18, 2008 11:15AM)
Any idea why this thread stopped ?? I don't think we ran out of magicians.
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Aug 8, 2008 11:17AM)
Trying to get this going again.
Message: Posted by: Daveandrews (Aug 8, 2008 07:36PM)
Johnny Hart
Message: Posted by: silverking (Aug 8, 2008 11:32PM)
Mark Wilson is a true giant in magic.
He still to this day commands total respect.

The trailblazers get somewhat "forgotten" in this internet age of magic, and there's a lot Mark Wilson did for magic and how the public viewed magic that deserves revisiting by todays magicians.

Famous being the title of this thread, the Wilson, Henning, Copperfield triad sums up what the public saw as "famous magicians" through much of the 60's and 70's, and on into the 80's.

I think in terms of overall numbers of people, it's only magicians who became well known on TV that achieved fame in the sense that, at least in every American household with a TV, everybody actually knew what they looked like, and who they were by name.
Message: Posted by: Gerry Walkowski (Aug 9, 2008 06:45AM)
Bill:

What about Milbourne Christopher? His TV specials preceeded Wilson by many years. Many people tend to forget that. I would say he opened the door for Mark Wilson.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Aug 10, 2008 11:54AM)
Milbourne Christopher had one nationally broadcast TV special, and it fell flat.

Mark Wilson had a series of specials. Series is the key here -- return business.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Aug 10, 2008 11:56AM)
[quote]
On 2008-07-17 11:26, Rennie wrote:
Why is the greatest , Fred Kaps not on anyone's list ? Would also include Tony Slydini as well as Cardini and Ed Marlo. Strange no one even mentions them.
Rennie
[/quote]

As good as all of them were, none of them were well known among the public. Fred Kaps was a hero in the Netherlands, but in the US, the only people that knew him were magicians -- except for those who saw him on the Sullivan show the night the Beatles debuted. Most of them did not remember him, though.

Slydini was the same way.

Cardini, OTOH, was well-known.

Marlo was strictly known to magicians.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Aug 10, 2008 12:03PM)
Correction to the Milbourne Christopher situation. He actually had more specials than that. One web site says 10. However, to my knowledge, he did not have a regular series of them, as Mark Wilson did.

Mark basically paved the way for the successful television magic series. He started by having a regular daytime show, broadcast live from three different cities in Texas. These were sponsored by Frito-Lay. He did this for several years, developing this series into his "Magical World of Allakazam."

He obtained these spots by contacting potential sponsors directly, then having them purchase the air time. It took him almost two years of constant pavement-pounding to get the sponsors for his show.

Later, when he was in Los Angeles, He approached one of the broadcasting companies about the same thing. They gave him the same song and dance that the TV stations in Texas had -- the public would think it was all television trickery.

Again, he pounded the pavement to get sponsors for his potential television series. Roughly two years later, he succeeded, and produced a very long string of successful television specials.

The interesting thing about Mark's television work was the ratings that his shows got.
Message: Posted by: mark2004 (Aug 11, 2008 05:58AM)
You might be doing an injustice to Milbourne Christopher. I think he has been under-rated because he started in a slightly earlier era than Mark Wilson. That slight difference in time represents a significant difference in the development of the television business. It could be argued that part of Mark Wilson's success was down to the fact that the time was right for someone to make a big national impact.

I agree that Wilson deserves credit for his dogged entrepreneurial approach in going out and getting sponsors. I think an even bigger factor was that he came up with a formula to get around the idea that magicians might use television tricks. That formula was the combination of a studio audience and the maintaining of a single camera shot during the illusion - he could credibly tell viewers that they saw exactly what the studio audience did.

Wilson might have been the one who finally made the big impact but Milbourne Christopher still deserves recognition for what he did in relation to magic and television. It's a bit like Neil Armstrong being the most famous astronaut - what he did was amazing but all the other astronauts who went before him, including those whose missions failed, were also contributing in a way to the journey to the Moon. The likes of David Copperfield have credited Christopher with doing a great deal to establish magic as a televisual entertainment - it's possible, even probable, that Wilson drew lessons from the weakenesses and strengths of Christopher's shows.

I'd also like to put in a word for Fred Culpitt, who is less well-known but was nevertheless the first magician ever to appear on TV. As one of the acts chosen by the BBC for its first experimental broadcasts in the late 1930s he helped to establish that magic, as a very visual art, had strengths that made it suitable for TV. He might never have been among the top 10 best known magicians in the world (although some of his illusions became standards), but he is nonethless significant.
Message: Posted by: mark2004 (Aug 11, 2008 06:43AM)
[quote]
As good as all of them were, none of them were well known among the public. Fred Kaps was a hero in the Netherlands, but in the US, the only people that knew him were magicians.
[/quote]

It has to be said that Mark Wilson's breakthrough with "Magical World of Allakazam" was essentially a US phenomenon. He was not nearly so well known outside the USA as he was inside it. So it's probably true that if you were an ordinary member of the Dutch public then Fred Kaps would've been in your top ten list of magicians and Wilson might not.

Obviously, over the years, the power of the American entertainment industry has meant that Mark Wilson's fame was exported, to an extent, through sales of his shows and through guest appearances. I think I recall seeing Wilson on the Paul Daniels Magic Show in Britain, but although he was given a big introduction he was still just another magician among many who guested on that series.

Also, TV firms around the world looked at America and saw what worked there when trying to make domestic production decisions - so Wilson's success in the USA will have aided magicians in Europe who were looking for a break into TV.

I'm not looking to belittle Mark Wilson here (quite the opposite - I think he's a brilliant and hugely important magician). What I'm saying is that you need to be careful to avoid assuming the American point of view is the only point of view.
Message: Posted by: Gerry Walkowski (Aug 11, 2008 06:35PM)
Mark:

You are spot on with your analysis and I couldn't agree with you more.

Bill, I'm quite surprised you didn't know about Christopher's other specials and didn't give Christopher the credit he truly deserved for keeping magic alive on TV for many years prior to Mark Wilson's arrival.
Message: Posted by: mark2004 (Aug 13, 2008 05:57AM)
[quote]
On 2008-08-11 19:35, Gerry Walkowski wrote:
Mark:

You are spot on with your analysis and I couldn't agree with you more.

Bill, I'm quite surprised you didn't know about Christopher's other specials and didn't give Christopher the credit he truly deserved for keeping magic alive on TV for many years prior to Mark Wilson's arrival.
[/quote]

Thanks for that Gerry. However I should leap to Bill's defence by saying I didn't really know much about Christopher's television career until this thread prompted me to look into it. Bill is right to point out Mark Wilson's place in getting magic established as a televisual entertainment - Wilson's achievement is worthy of a place in history even though others made significant steps before him.

In terms of doing justice to magicians who achieved public recognition I think it is important to remember those who mirrored Wilson's achievements in other parts of the world. That's why I listed David Nixon in my top four. Nixon is probably not well-known in the USA but in Britain he was iconic and he set a standard for the presentation of magic on television that continued to influence programme makers for several decades. In the late 1960s if you asked an average Brit in the street about magic the first name they'd think of would almost certainly be Nixon.
Message: Posted by: Magicray69 (Aug 14, 2008 08:21PM)
Richardi, Jr. - The Ed Sullivan Show
7 October 1956
14 October 1956
4 November 1956
1 September 1957
16 February 1958
13 July 1958
21 February 1960
23 April 1961
17 September 1961
12 May 1963
1 October 1967
Message: Posted by: mark2004 (Aug 19, 2008 03:42AM)
[quote]
On 2008-08-14 21:21, Magicray69 wrote:
Richardi, Jr. - The Ed Sullivan Show
7 October 1956
14 October 1956
4 November 1956
1 September 1957
16 February 1958
13 July 1958
21 February 1960
23 April 1961
17 September 1961
12 May 1963
1 October 1967
[/quote]

That's really interesting. I knew Richiardi had the record for the most appearances by a magician on The Ed Sullivan Show but I didn't realise he started out so early. Clearly he deserves credit as a pioneer in that department.

Can you point me to the source of your information on those dates?
Message: Posted by: critter (Aug 19, 2008 10:37PM)
T. Nelson Downs, Merlin, Houdini, Cardini, 4 or 5 isn't enough!
Carter. It is tough to stop there.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Aug 19, 2008 11:50PM)
I'll go with Houdini, Carl Ballantine, Art Metrano and Dom Deluise.
Message: Posted by: MagicalArtist (Aug 27, 2008 04:07PM)
When I saw this thread title I thought it meant "the most famous living magicians of 1969!" As noted, the thread title could be interpreted any number of different ways.

The subject would be narrowed down considerably if it were titled something like "the historically most famous magicians before the television era." Television changed everything, because it made it possible for a magician to be seen by more people in a single performance than could traditionally be seen in an entire lifetime.

I agree that there's no discounting the incredible popularity of Alexander Herrmann during his lifetime. Remember that the stereotypical image of a magician with a moustache and goatee that we still have today came from Herrmann.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Sep 4, 2008 10:54PM)
[quote]
On 2008-08-27 17:07, MagicalArtist wrote:
When I saw this thread title I thought it meant "the most famous living magicians of 1969!" As noted, the thread title could be interpreted any number of different ways.
[/quote]
I did not find it that complicated. Said nothing about living or dead..
"Please list the 4 or 5 most POPULAR magicians of yesteryear"
Message: Posted by: Harry Murphy (Sep 5, 2008 07:27PM)
A few I would add include:

Adele Hermann a contemporary of Houdini and in her day out drew him in many venues, she had a huge, popular, and well received show.

Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin the father of modern magic.

I just asked my 90 year old aunt what magicians she remembered and she named two Houdini and Frakson. She saw both (decades apart) and remembers both (or claims to).

Igor Kio (huge in the Moscow Circus and hugely popular in the old Soviet Union. He also produced annual TV magic specials in his country. He was perhaps even more popular than his father Emil or brother Emil Jr. - another magic family dynasty).
Message: Posted by: DonDriver (Sep 5, 2008 08:01PM)
Marshall Brodien was probably on TV more than any magician with TV magic cards.That might have been after 1970.He was on the BoBo show as Wizzo but only in the Chicago area.

A bit of triva about Milbourne Christopher.If you look in his great book "The Illustrated History of Magic" you'll see its dsdicated to Phil Thomas who owned the Yogi Magic Mart in Baltimore Md.I worked there in the late 60s and eary 70s.

Phil had a local TV magic show in the really early 50s called Phil Thomas and friends.( that I was on when I was about 10 in the audience)

Melbourne and Phil worked together to develope what magic would play well on TV.Jay Marshall was also in on this with them.This was before Melbourne's national TV special.Phil was doing his local show at the time when they were all discussing this.

I heard this story many times right from the horses mouth as Melbourne came in the shop all the time to visit with Phil.

Later,Don
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Sep 5, 2008 08:32PM)
Off the top of my head, I'm almost positive that Baltimore is where Milbourne grew up. I remember too him telling me that he kept a warehouse down there for his collection. He had a ton of stuff.
Message: Posted by: DonDriver (Sep 5, 2008 09:29PM)
Yes Kevin Milbourne grew up in Baltimore.He and Phil had an act together called "Phil and Mil" when they were teenagers.I have seen photos of the two of them back stage when they were about 15 or so with Howard Thurston at Fords theater in Baltimore.Not sure of the year. ( yes the same Ford that owned the theater in Washington D.C.,long gone but still keep the name)
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Sep 5, 2008 10:38PM)
Thanks for the info. I met many magicians over the years, but Milbourne was different. To me, he seemed to eat, sleep etc, magic. I never saw another person with such a focus for one subject.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Sep 8, 2008 03:33AM)
I actually saw Christopher's first special. I vaguely remember that he had Kalanag on it doing a vanishing Mercedes. But it was more of a show that had several magicians on it than a show that starred one magician with, perhaps, a couple of featured acts.
Message: Posted by: Barnum (Sep 15, 2008 11:40AM)
Did anyone ever see Joseph Dunninger perform? He was a magician, escapologist and mentalist.

Thanks in advance.
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Sep 15, 2008 01:14PM)
Milbourne Christopher also put on one of the last big shows of that era on Broadway at the Maidman Playhouse in 1960 where I got to see him perform and later met him backstage, a thrill I will always cherish.
Message: Posted by: Marshall Thornside (Sep 15, 2008 11:43PM)
Mark Wilson had a successful series because he was financially
backed by Pillsbury.

Did Magic Circus only ran in the 1970's or are you referring to
Alakazaam running in the 1960's?

The only other person to have a sucessful and longest running
magic show on TV was Dick Williams.

'Wonderama' was another show.

I think those two ran in the 1970's.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Sep 17, 2008 12:48AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-15 12:40, Barnum wrote:
Did anyone ever see Joseph Dunninger perform? He was a magician, escapologist and mentalist.

Thanks in advance.
[/quote]
I used to watch Dunninger on TV. Only saw his mentalism act though. He found out early in his career that he could make more money in mentalism than any of the others.
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Sep 17, 2008 11:43AM)
During Houdini's era there was a comedy magician MAKING MORE MONEY in vaudeveille and in England... Frank van Hoven.

BTW; Jay Marshall had more appearances on the Sullivan show than Richiardi.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Sep 17, 2008 12:41PM)
And Topo Gigo had more than Jay. Go figure.
Message: Posted by: Barnum (Sep 19, 2008 08:24AM)
Thanks Rennie - I've been reading about Dunninger online - absolutely fascinating.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Sep 19, 2008 12:56PM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-19 09:24, Barnum wrote:
Thanks Rennie - I've been reading about Dunninger online - absolutely fascinating.
[/quote]
I have always found Dunninger fascinating. Buy the book "Dunningers Brainbusters" by Joseph Atmore. Very interesting stuff.
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Sep 19, 2008 01:20PM)
Barnum,
Check this out;

http://www.noonco.com/dunninger/

Rennie
Message: Posted by: Barnum (Sep 23, 2008 11:00PM)
Absolutely brilliant - thanks Rennie.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Nov 1, 2008 11:25AM)
"Most popular" is a touchy subject as there is more inhabitants in Europe than in the States but there are less inhabitant in each European countries.

Also the implied ambiguity between talent and popularity is disturbing. The quantity of people who "know about" is not a guaranty of excellence (40 million nazis didn't make Hitler right).

I think that fame with the peers is as valid as the popularity with the lay audience (which is more a marketing thing and therefore a language thing as well).

Paul Daniels was already famous everywhere in Europe and in British colonies where British chnnels were selling their programs.
Therefore I think that Fred Kaps should be on the list, but with Vernon, Slydini etc...

Now for the earlier generation I would ask if, next to the great already mentioned in other posts, people like Horace Goldin or Eddie Joseph (who was famous with his peers in India, UK, France, Italy, Germany and the US) or the South African Robert Harbin. Even Pavel may be considered as he had a great entry with his occidental peers but was also recognized in Eastern Europe. What about Rezvani who was known in Persia, Europe and the States? What about Raynali and the Chinese rings?

Does "fame" in English means exactly the same as "popularity". Isn't there a nuance of respect in "fame" which popularity doesn't necessarily include?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Dec 22, 2008 11:35AM)
Usually "fame" refers to name and face recognition, not necessarily to "popularity." Neither word has any implication of quality.

For example, Bin Laden is certainly famous everywhere in the world. But in most countries, he is not popular. The same is true of Adolf Hitler. Famous, but not popular, except in some areas that are populated by people with twisted minds.

If we are concerned with fame on the grand scale, peer recognition is not as important a factor as others would be.
Message: Posted by: Levity (Jan 26, 2009 05:12PM)
Let us not forget Okito. Or Chung Ling Soo.

Geoffrey
Message: Posted by: amshake (Jan 28, 2009 09:07AM)
What about John Calvert? Traveled the world has performed for MILLIONS!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jan 31, 2009 02:53PM)
Sadly, he doesn't have the name recognition among the lay people that Mark Wilson has (or had). The difference was regular television exposure.

John will be lecturing in Houston on Feb. 3.
Message: Posted by: critter (Feb 3, 2009 09:59AM)
Speaking of Milbourne Christopher, there's video of him on
http://www.magicvideoblog.com
Great site!
Message: Posted by: Terry Veckey (Feb 4, 2009 04:18AM)
[quote]
On 2008-09-17 12:43, Pete Biro wrote:
During Houdini's era there was a comedy magician MAKING MORE MONEY in vaudeveille and in England... Frank van Hoven.

BTW; Jay Marshall had more appearances on the Sullivan show than Richiardi.
[/quote]
Thanks Pete.
I was just wondering how long it would take before some one mentioned Jay. I believe it was around 14 appearances. Also remember Lefty is retired and living in the Smithsonian.
Ballintine, Brodien, Fantasio (sp.), Shimada. Does Bill Bixby count, or am I slipping into the 80's.
Message: Posted by: bishthemagish (Feb 6, 2009 07:48AM)
Lets see - Jay Marshall - Billy Bishop - Roy Benson - Galli Galli - Frackson - Richardi - Calvert - Mark Willson - Al Baker - Jack Gwynne - Chop Chop - Blackstone Jr and Sr. Virgil and Julie - The Great Leon - Fred Keating - Louis Zingone - Okito - Fu Manchu (Okito's son David) T N Downs - Al Flosso - John Scarne - Emil Jarrow - Bert Allerton - Paul LePaul - Cardini - J. Warren Keane - Francis Carlyle - Sam Margules - Mickey MacDougle -

And their are more - The interesting thing is that Jay Marshall knew all of them and my Dad knew most of them.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 6, 2009 10:13AM)
[quote]
On 2008-12-22 12:35, Bill Palmer wrote:
Usually "fame" refers to name and face recognition, not necessarily to "popularity." Neither word has any implication of quality.

For example, Bin Laden is certainly famous everywhere in the world. But in most countries, he is not popular. The same is true of Adolf Hitler. Famous, but not popular, except in some areas that are populated by people with twisted minds.

If we are concerned with fame on the grand scale, peer recognition is not as important a factor as others would be.
[/quote]
I disagree, these two men are infamous, not famous.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Feb 6, 2009 10:15AM)
I agree that neither word implies quality, but one certainly implies popularity, while the other implies something entirely different.

Fish
Message: Posted by: basic_mystifier (Feb 10, 2009 05:23PM)
Houdini, Cardini, Richardi, Blackstone the ones my dad remembered.....I wasnt born before 1970 sorry
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 10, 2009 11:22PM)
There is also a "Lefty" in the Magic Circle Museum in London. I was there when Sandy donated it to the Magic Circle.
Message: Posted by: bishthemagish (Feb 11, 2009 08:04AM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-04 05:18, Terry Veckey wrote:
Brodien,
[/quote]
Good one Terry - Marshall Brodien should be named. I think that he is still one of the most famous magicians - and got a lot of people interested in magic doing TV magic cards on television as well as playing Wizo on the WGN Bozo TV show.
Message: Posted by: Fred Johnson (Feb 11, 2009 01:00PM)
Alexander could be added to the list.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 11, 2009 01:02PM)
If you mention Marshall to non-magicians outside of Chicago they are unlikely recognize the name. I know this from my own experience.
Message: Posted by: Terry Veckey (Feb 11, 2009 03:26PM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-11 14:02, Bill Palmer wrote:
If you mention Marshall to non-magicians outside of Chicago they are unlikely recognize the name. I know this from my own experience.
[/quote]

That's true Bill. However, if your talking to someone old enough to remember the Sullivan show, mention the white glove that turned into a rabbit or Juan Escadero.
They always know who I.m talking about.
Message: Posted by: Terry Veckey (Feb 11, 2009 10:16PM)
Oh, yeah.
If you were talking about Marshall Brodien.
I do a routine with a Sevengali deck and joke about "TV Magic Cards".
Again, those old enough know exactly whom I'm talking about and the thirty somethings enjoy it anyway.
BTW, I'm working in a night club, 5 nights a week, out here in Medford, Or.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Feb 12, 2009 12:07AM)
I was talking about Marshall Brodien. They remember TV Magic Cards, but they won't remember Marshall's name unless you feed it to them.

Just try this. Go out and ask if anyone remembers who sold the TV Magic Cards on television. If they can tell you, then they are probably magicians.

BTW, few people know how many magic sets Marshall put together for various magicians, movies, etc. I made Marshall's acquaintance at a MCA convention a few years ago. I gave him the username and password to the cups and balls museum, and invited him to visit it. When he finally took the time to visit it, he sent me his set of P&L cups, one of every set of cups that he had worked out for the various magic sets and a couple of 8 by 10 glossies, as Marshall Brodien and as Wizzo.

I also have his biography -- both editions. Marshall's a good guy and has some wonderful stories about the "family" he used to work for so often! ;)
Message: Posted by: Terry Veckey (Feb 12, 2009 05:16AM)
Let's leave our family relationships out of these threads, thank you. Let's just say, it was an interesting clientel that frequented the finer restaurants in Chicago's northewest suburbs then. Btw. I started at at the New York Lounge but left when Marshall asked me to work at Lancers which became Victors. While at Victors I was also working at Allgaures Fireside and Faces on Rush St. (LOL, I was in a lot of demaned back then.)

Anyway, Marshall squared off against Jimmy Grippo in a court case in Vegas. They each were called in as expert witnesses. The case was about a prize-fighter and whether it was legal for him to be hypnotized prior to the fight. It's killin' me. I can't remember all the details. They each got a lot of publicity though.

Cheers!
Terry V.
Message: Posted by: bishthemagish (Feb 12, 2009 07:45AM)
[quote]
On 2009-02-11 14:02, Bill Palmer wrote:
If you mention Marshall to non-magicians outside of Chicago they are unlikely recognize the name. I know this from my own experience.
[/quote]
Yes I agree - and the same thing happens when you mention such "famous" magicians as Dante - Blackstone - Blackstone Jr. - Doug Henning - Mark Wilson - The Great Thomsoni and many other magicians that were well known to the public for a "short" time because they did their act on a TV show.

I wish I had a dollar every time a spectator wanted to talk about the "last" magician that they saw that was on TV - and it ended up to be Marshall Brodien doing the TV Magic Cards.

It is interesting but a lot of today's audience doesn't remember or doesn't know about a lot of the TV shows that a lot of these "famous" magicians used to appear on - like Mike Douglas and Ed Sullivan.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Feb 14, 2009 12:01AM)
The title of the thread would seem to eliminate Doug Henning. It specifies that the magicians concerned were popular before 1970. In 1970 Doug was a student at McMaster University. His Broadway show, called The Magic Show begain in 1974 and his first TV special was in December of 1975. That's when his popularity really began.

Milbourne Christopher did appear on some TV programs, but they were not his own "Specials" in the sense that Henning and Copperfield and Blaine have had their own shows with their name in the titles on a major network in prime time.
Christopher did package a TV show featuring many different magic acts for CBS or maybe NBC, but he was only one of the acts on the show. Another of his specials was actually an episode of the Jackie Gleason show called the American Scene magazine. Christopher put all of the magic together and was onstage almost continuously as an assistant, but Jackie Gleason performed the tricks (many from the Abbott Magic Catalog) in his character of Reginald Van Gleason III.

Mark Wilson's hour long TV shows were called Magic Circus. They were not network, but syndicated shows and there were 4 of them.

These early TV appearance hardly made Milbourne Christopher a household name, as Henning and Copperfield were to become in the 70's and 80's. And Blaine and Angel more recently.


As has been pointed out, mere name recognition is not the same thing as popularity. But because of the numbers of kids that watched Mark Wilson's Saturday morning show: The Magic Land of Alakazam (whose first sponsor was Kellog's) probably Mark Wilson was the best known magician of all times. Every time he did a Saturday morning show, more people watched him than watched Blackstone, Thurston, Kellar, or Dante during their entire performing careers.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Kevinr (Jun 11, 2009 11:46PM)
No order here but these are the name most people know as of today... Would be a nice poll to have most non magcians to take.


Harry Houdini

Houdini is one of the greatest magicians of the world. He was born in Hungary and in his childhood his parents moved to the United States. He made his first show when he was 9 years old. He started his career with card acts and later became famous for his escape acts. He showed his most famous magic named “Chinese Water Torture” in 1913. He is thought to have the power of picking any lock in the world. He wrote many books regarding some of his tricks. In his later life he became famous for his act as a ghost buster. Houdini was inspired by another famous musician named Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin.




David Copperfield

David Copperfield is the famous musician and illusionist. His famous magics are disappearing Stature of Liberty, flying, levitating over the Grand Canyon and walking through the Great Wall of China etc. He is also famous for his story telling power. This American talented musician started practicing magic when he was 12. He entered in the Society of the American Magicians as the youngest person and when he was 16 he started teaching a course in magic in the New York University. He also acted in some movies including ‘Terror Train’, Pret-a-Porter’. He is also famous for storytelling. According to the Forbes Magazine, his per year income $57 million in 2003 and became the tenth highly paid celebrity in the world. He makes over 500 shows throughout the world in a year.


Criss Angel
This American magician, illusionist and stunt performer is famous for his television series called ‘Chriss Angel Mindfreak’. He is sometimes compared with the street magician David Blaine. His current telivision show is named ‘Cirque du Soleil’. Criss Angel is a musician and involved in band groups. Three time magicaian of the year champion (David Copperfield only won this award twice)


Jean Eugène Robert-Houdin
Robert-Houdin is named as the pioneer of the modern performance art of illusionism. In his early life he was a watchmaker. He was very influential performer of his time and was thought to be the person who could make anything possible. This Frenchman is called the father of modern magic as he performed in the theaters and private parties which was a new trend because the magicians, before him, performed in the fairs and marketplaces. He is the first performer of the bullet catch. Once he asked a person to shoot him with a marked ball but after shooting him the ball was found between the teeth of that person. He used to wear formal dresses like his audience. A movie was made on Robert-Houdin by the novel called “World of Wonders” by Robertson Davies.


David Blaine
This American magician is famous for his street and close-up magic which was the new trend in magic. As David was a street magician he could notice the real reaction of the spectators. In his earlier life he showed card acts. Later he focused on feats of endurance. He could have been buried for 7 days alive. His TV special ‘Frozen in Time’ was very popular where he showed that he can encase for 61 hours, 40 minutes, and 15 seconds. In his popular named ‘Vertigo’ he was lifted by a crane onto a90 foot high pillar. This great magician told that he became happy when he saw that people irrespective of religion, age, sex, and race come to see his magic and smile.



P.C. Sorcar
P.C. Sorcar is a famous Indian magician who got many international awards for his performances throughout the world. His popular show is known as ‘Indrajal’. This great magician was very popular in 1930s to 1960s. He was awarded the Padma Shri by the President of India in 1964 and The Sphinx known as Oscar of magic twice in 1946 and in 1954. He was died in 1971 at the age of 58 in Japan.


Doug Henning
This famous magician famous for his Escape tricks. He had a distinct way in his clothing and appearance such as bushy mustache and clothes with different color. He first performed at a birthday party of his friend when he was 14. He was graduated in Psychology. Some of his famous magic shoes are ‘Spellbound’, ‘The Magic Show’, Doug Henning’s World of Magic’ etc. He also made many shows in TV. He had a skill to entertain people. He is admired by many of the magic lovers.

Penn and Teller
These American duos are illusionists. Peen Jillette is a raconteur while Teller does not speak during the performance. After meeting in 1975, Peen and Telller have been performing in various serials and shows. Some of their television serials are ‘Late Night with David Lettermen’, ‘Saturday Night Live’ etc. Some of their tricks are very famous such as tractor-trailer, apple and violence, bullet catch etc.



Harry Blackstone, Sr.
Harry was a stage magician who also performed in television. He is also called ‘The Great Blackstone’. He is famous for his show named ‘The Magic Castle’. He was very popular as a USO entertainer during the World War II. Many books were written on him including the comic book ‘Blackstone the Magician Detective’ by Walter B. Gibson and a radio series was also named ‘Blackstone, the Magic Detective’.

Harry Potter
I know that a movie character can not be a real magician. However, I think that as magic is nothing but some tricks that entertain us, Harry Potter, the central character of the movie named ‘Harry Potter’ by J.K. Rowling can also make us amazed with his supernatural activities in the movie through which we feel same of the feelings of the magic. As our focus is on fun then Harry Potter can be a magician. This movie is considered as one of the greatest movies in the world.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 12, 2009 05:41PM)
You left out Merlin, Albertus Magnus, Cagliostro, John Dee, Roger Bacon and all of the REAL magicians who inspired all of us fakes!

BTW, Doug Henning did just a few escape tricks. He did the upside down on his first television special, but most of his work was in illusion. He did give Jim Steinmeyer and John Gaughan fits with some of his original illusion ideas, though.

Penn and Teller met before 1975. They performed at the Minnesota Renaissance Festival before then.
Message: Posted by: D.N. (Jun 13, 2009 02:17PM)
[quote]
On 2009-06-12 00:46, Kevinr wrote:

Criss Angel
This American magician, illusionist and stunt performer is famous for his television series called ‘Chriss Angel Mindfreak’. He is sometimes compared with the street magician David Blaine. His current telivision show is named ‘Cirque du Soleil’. Criss Angel is a musician and involved in band groups. Three time magicaian of the year champion (David Copperfield only won this award twice)

[/quote]


First of all, it's Criss Angel Mindfreak. Now that's that.
Secondly: His current television show is named `Cirque du Soleil`? Are you f****** kidding?
And lastly: He's now received the Magician of the Year award 5 times, not 3. Plus Magician of the Decade.