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Topic: Physician wants patients to not cry
Message: Posted by: Aristides (Apr 30, 2003 01:08PM)
Hello, I am a physician who dabbles in magic as a way to entertain my children patients so their experience in my office is not so traumatic. I have had great luck with the D'lite and the Mr. Bubble tricks and want to know if anyone out there knows of a quick but visually impressive trick to help children take their minds off of their vaccinations. Thanks in advance.
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Apr 30, 2003 01:26PM)
Use a palmed squeaker to "squeak" the patient when you touch him or her.

Give the patient a coin to hold when administering the shot—bent coin in patient's hand.

0pus
Message: Posted by: Aristides (Apr 30, 2003 01:57PM)
I've tried the squeaker with excellent success but I haven't used the bent coin yet. Sounds good!
Message: Posted by: Billy Whizz (Apr 30, 2003 04:04PM)
Sounds like a fantastic idea, I bet the children look forward to coming to see you. Do you do balloon modeling? If so, make a balloon animal, then squeeze it with the squeaker palmed, making it squeak, and then give it to the child to try and make it squeak taking their minds off of their vaccinations.
Message: Posted by: p.b.jones (Apr 30, 2003 04:09PM)
Hi,
how about a paddle routine with one of those sticks that you stick in people's mouths to check throats or the old idea of palming a plastic frog ala a frog in your throat?
Phillip
Message: Posted by: Aristides (Apr 30, 2003 05:12PM)
Billy, thanks for the compliment. I recently did the Mr. Bubble trick on a boy with appendicitis while he was waiting to see the surgeon, and his mother later told me he couldn't stop talking about it during his recovery. Unfortunately we physicians tend to discourage younger children and balloons because of the few fatal cases where kids have choked on a popped balloon.
Phillip's "frog from the throat" sounds great!
Message: Posted by: Frank Tougas (Apr 30, 2003 08:52PM)
Hi Aristides, I worked four years in a hospital in children's day treatment as a therapist and have seen plenty of kids go ballistic when it came time for a blood draw. I would do paper balls over the head to distract them.

One of the psychiatrists on the unit would do coin through rubber sheet (known by various names, coin-thru, etc.). He would set it up by cutting a latex glove into a square. What with the demise of latex in the medical offices due to some allergic reactions the gloves are no longer found in most medical offices, however you have to admit it is a very visual trick. It is also not done much anymore which would take away the "I've seen that before" factor. If you feel the risk of allergic reaction is low for a particular patient, get some dental dams and go for it.
Message: Posted by: DanTheMagicMan (May 1, 2003 12:40AM)
A TT is good for appearing and vanishing a silk. I have heard of magicians using it in a hospital setting to appear and then vanish a silk within the sheets of the hospital bed.
Message: Posted by: magician_carter (May 1, 2003 05:42AM)
Part of my "Giving back to the Community", I perform at our local children's hospital a couple of times a month and I have found that the Magic Coloring Book is a great effect for grabbing their attention and taking their minds off of what is going on. I also use the D'lites, paddle trick, spongeballs and sponge bunnies. You might want to get the "Puff the Magic Dragon" sponge effect.

Magically yours,

Carter :magicrabbit:
Message: Posted by: Emazdad (May 2, 2003 01:59AM)
Some great suggestions, I like the ballooon model and a squeaker idea best, mainly because it gives you some thing to give them as a reward. Plus next time it will be even easier as they know they'll get a balloon if they're good.

You could tell them the Balloon Animal is hurt and get them to put a sticky plaster on it; while they play doctor you give them the jab.
Message: Posted by: Chrystal (May 2, 2003 02:22AM)
Hi Arestides

A quick and visual effect is the coloring book like Carter mentioned in a previous post. Sounds like the kids are lucky to have you as their physician. Best of luck to you. :babyface:
Message: Posted by: ClodAppleleft (May 2, 2003 08:23AM)
One effect that I have found that kids and parents absolutely adore is Sponge Bunnies. Standard sponge ball routine with sponge bunnies. For some reason, this gets a bigger reaction then standard sponge balls. Then you let them hold the rabbits and play with them while you do your thing.
Message: Posted by: Aristides (May 2, 2003 11:06AM)
Thank you all for your time and suggestions. I'll try a few out and let you all know what works best.
Message: Posted by: sugam (Jan 20, 2005 09:27PM)
Looking for effects for children in hospitals. What is the Mr. Bubble effect?
Message: Posted by: rossmacrae (Jan 20, 2005 10:30PM)
Let's see ... Needle Thru Arm ... Chopper ...


Okay, okay, I'm sorry.
Message: Posted by: sugam (Jan 20, 2005 10:53PM)
Hah, that should calm them down!
Message: Posted by: Al Kazam the Magic Man (Jan 20, 2005 11:06PM)
I do work in a hospital on a weekly basis. I do the silks and TT a lot there. I try and get the kids involved with it, though. Give them a small wand, get them to blow on the things, etcetera.

The kids really like it. Sponge balls are great too, except with the kids who are heavily sedated. They don't really catch what's going on sometimes.

D'lites have been great for me, too. (Got to watch out for the light, though. I sometimes turn the lights off and do them.)

All the best,

JoJo
Message: Posted by: Creative Coach (Jan 21, 2005 05:23AM)
I have a book to suggest: Side-FX by Scott Tokar Also has a companion DVD

Here's the URL: http://www.corporatefx.com/side-fx.htm

Hope this helps!

John
Message: Posted by: macmagic (Jan 21, 2005 05:38AM)
Yup, was going to suggest SideFX as well. The entire CD is about tricks you can do with materials you would find in a doctor's office---cut-and-restored stethoscope, etc. It's really good!
Message: Posted by: sugam (Jan 21, 2005 12:36PM)
I was looking at SideFX because I Googled "cut and restored stethoscope". I'll look for more detailed reviews. The effects look like good adaptations of original effects... just with different objects.
Message: Posted by: Bob T. (Jan 21, 2005 08:53PM)
I have to agree the coloring book is great trick to use. I use it I'm my office and the younger kids will come back for another visit and ask to see the coloring book again and again. Also I get a lot of play out of a squeeker, take their reappointment card draw a face on the back and push on the nose to make it squeek.
Hard for the parent to get the card back from the child. Sponge balls/bunnies are also great to use. Kids also seem to like a tt and silk. With older kids will do a tt and mismade bill and let them take the bill home.
I got intersted in magic because my pediatrician use to do magic when I went to his office. Always looked forward to going to his office when I was a kid.
Message: Posted by: Sam Harper (Dec 30, 2011 11:45AM)
I know this is an old thread, but I'm also a physician and have been coming back to magic after a presentation by Dr Chawla who regularly uses magic in the ER and office. He has a website http://www.magicandmedicine.ca

Magic is a great way to build rapport with patients. It also helps to "humanizing" the doctor, lowering barriers between us and the patients.

I use sponge bunnies every now and then or french drop the otoscope speculum. I've also been using Dr Chawla's disappearing pen effect which is so simple I never thought it would work, but it gets a great reaction from the kids (and the parents too...)
Message: Posted by: bowers (Dec 30, 2011 12:58PM)
I also think the silk vanish or appearence with a tt would be very flashy and and quick.keep up the good work aristides.
todd
Message: Posted by: MichaelCGM (Dec 30, 2011 03:17PM)
I agree that a squeaker is great and offers tons of possibilities. Also think about Crazy Man's Handcuffs, Snap Coin Vanish, and mouth coils... yeah... tons of mouth coils. Kids are absolutely fascinated by them.
Message: Posted by: Magic_engineer (Dec 30, 2011 08:21PM)
Depending on the age, I would suggest Coloring Book for the younger children and sponge balls (or rabbts) for older. We have given both to our dentist, who has a fondness for magic. My daughter just suggested a spring animal would be fun and anything combined with give aways (stickers, plastic rings, etc).
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Dec 30, 2011 08:53PM)
Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?
Message: Posted by: MichaelCGM (Dec 30, 2011 11:05PM)
[quote]On 2011-12-30 21:53, Howie Diddot wrote: Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?[/quote]Now there's a reward worthy of any kid's attention. Where do I sign up? :)
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Dec 30, 2011 11:47PM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-31 00:05, MichaelCGM wrote:
[quote]On 2011-12-30 21:53, Howie Diddot wrote: Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?[/quote]Now there's a reward worthy of any kid's attention. Where do I sign up? :)
[/quote]
I am not a physician, and I don’t play one on the Magic Café; Aristides I am sure will not supply you with any, since he makes the kids dizzy with magic; that leave only Conrad Murray, when he gets out of jail, I hear he buys the stuff by the gallon and may have some left.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Dec 31, 2011 06:36AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-30 21:53, Howie Diddot wrote:
Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?
[/quote]
Kind of reminds me of the whiskey solution. It works! Too bad that stuff like that has a bad rap today.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Dec 31, 2011 08:50AM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-31 07:36, Alan Munro wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-12-30 21:53, Howie Diddot wrote:
Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?
[/quote]
Kind of reminds me of the whiskey solution. It works! Too bad that stuff like that has a bad rap today.
[/quote]
I remember back in the 60's Acid (LSD) was a good remedy to alleviate any fear of the Doctor, or of any reality; too bad that had a bad rap LOL
Message: Posted by: The Mighty Fool (Dec 31, 2011 11:26AM)
Oh for cryin'...what's the matter with you guys? The D'LITES!! Using those things in front of a child will TOTALLY distract them from whatever is happening. Give a little kid one to 'hold' & squeeze so he 'absorbs' it, and tell him that makes things not hurt. Then afterward, remove it via his mouth.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Dec 31, 2011 08:39PM)
[quote]
On 2011-12-31 09:50, Howie Diddot wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-12-31 07:36, Alan Munro wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-12-30 21:53, Howie Diddot wrote:
Aristides, have you tried to administer Propofol or Valium as a reward, so they won't cry?
[/quote]
Kind of reminds me of the whiskey solution. It works! Too bad that stuff like that has a bad rap today.
[/quote]
I remember back in the 60's Acid (LSD) was a good remedy to alleviate any fear of the Doctor, or of any reality; too bad that had a bad rap LOL
[/quote]
After reviewing the LSD studies of the '60s, I'd consider participating in a medically supervised experiment. The ideas generated from such a thing could make the experience quite lucrative. Too bad that the government made that illegal - so much for this being a "free country". The Netherlands look better with each passing day. LOL
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Dec 31, 2011 09:57PM)
Alan;

You’re my kind of cutting edge Magician; in the 60's I conducted my own medically supervised experiment; it was a very small study..

I funded the program, purchased the inventory and supervised distributing the medication to the volunteer participant,

It was a very successful study until the funding ran out and the government attempted to intrude on the research.