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Topic: Cutting Mis-Made Bills from a Sheet
Message: Posted by: Exitmat (Aug 1, 2009 04:30PM)
I just ordered a sheet of uncut $1 so that I can cut (I might tear a few as a T&R plot but I want to cut most of them) my own mis-made bills to give away. My question is, for those that have done it, what is the best and most practical way to cut the bills? Do scissors work okay or is it better to use an x-acto knife or blade paper trimmer? What is the best way to measure the bills out? Lining up the mis-made bill I have and cutting one at a time or using a pencil and measuring it out and cutting a bunch at once?

Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 2, 2009 06:40PM)
The best way to go is with a high quality Roller cutter. Maybe I just got lucky, but I went to my local Office Depot and asked the manager about using their machine, which was large enough to handle the sheet. She let me do it and I was able to cut the whole sheet in about 30 minutes. I think I got 18-20 mismade bills. I gave her one as a thank you. I used an existing mismade bill for a template. As you cut, you get better at it. I now pretty much have a lifetime supply for $55.00! For special people, I borrow their dollar bill, fold it using a TT switch and leave them with the mismade bill. Buying the sheets and cutting them yourself makes this into an affordable option that leaves a lasting impression.

Best of Luck!
Sammy
Message: Posted by: mrmagik68 (Aug 3, 2009 03:19AM)
Sammy,
That's a great idea. Where do you buy the sheets of bills?

Thanks,
Roberto
Message: Posted by: Exitmat (Aug 3, 2009 05:54AM)
Thanks for the reply, Sammy.

That's exactly what I did--bought 2 sheets of 32 bills each. If my math is correct that should give me 21 bills per sheet, 42 for both. In the end it will cost about $1.60 to perform and give away the mismade bill each time.

Roberto,

You can buy uncut sheets of money here: http://www.bep.treas.gov/
Also, if you own the Switch book by John Lovick the address is in the intro section to the mismade bill.
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 3, 2009 06:29PM)
You're right Exit! I puts the bill at a cost that you can afford to give it away. What a memory for the spectator! I used to buy this for about $14.00 each!

Sammy
Message: Posted by: Steven Keyl (Aug 4, 2009 02:53PM)
I've had great success making these with just an X-acto knife, a metal ruler and a backboard to cut on. Once you figure out exactly where to cut vertically (between the E and S in reserve if memory serves) and horizontally you can make the cuts without even using a real bill as a template. And of course after you make the cuts the size matches up perfectly. My first sheet took me about an hour. Since then I can cut up a 21 bill sheet in about 20 minutes.
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 4, 2009 09:19PM)
Hi Steven,
Did you have trouble using a ruler because of the width of the sheet? That was always my concern. How did you work around it?
Thanks,
Sammy
Message: Posted by: TC Ryder (Aug 12, 2009 10:01AM)
Sammy,

Have you tried to make a Quadrabill out of the ones you made?

TC
Message: Posted by: Steven Keyl (Aug 13, 2009 05:01PM)
Sammy,

I didn't have a problem using a ruler because my cut points were always the same. I would line up the ruler between the 'E' and 'S' in reserve through two or three bills and then reposition the ruler on the cut and then keep going through the next bills at exactly the same point.

The key to this method though is to have set points that you're using (both vertically and horizontally) then it doesn't matter how large the sheets are and/or how small your ruler is.

Hope this made sense.
Message: Posted by: ralphs007 (Aug 13, 2009 06:02PM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-04 22:19, Sammy J. wrote:
Hi Steven,
Did you have trouble using a ruler because of the width of the sheet? That was always my concern. How did you work around it?
Thanks,
Sammy
[/quote]
Hi Sammy
Carpenter's use a tool that's called a Tee Square. It's used to make a square line or cut, on sheet goods. It's sorta like a giant framing square, and it can be bought at Home Depot for less than 20.00 . This square is also used as a straight edge (like a ruler) to guide your razor knife. Since the blade is almost 48" long, cutting a sheet of bills, would be a piece of cake.
http://www.castlewholesalers.com/JOHNSON-JTS54HD-54-Heavy-DutyAluminum-Drywall-T-Square.html
hth
Ralph
Message: Posted by: marty.sasaki (Aug 13, 2009 08:20PM)
To steady things if cutting using a razor knife, tape the sheet down to your backing sheet to keep it from moving round. If the ruler is long enough you can carefully position it and then tape it down as well. Use masking tape, it won't leave any residue if you remove it right after cutting.
Message: Posted by: Exitmat (Aug 14, 2009 11:26AM)
I bought a hobby cutting board, a straight edge, and an X-acto knife and cut a sheet of Mis-Made Bills. They came out great. Thanks for the responses, guys.
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 15, 2009 11:42AM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-12 11:01, TC Ryder wrote:
Sammy,

Have you tried to make a Quadrabill out of the ones you made?

TC
[/quote]

Hi TC, I'm not familiar with the quadrabill. What is it?
Thanks,
Sammy
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 15, 2009 10:10PM)
By the way, just carrying one of these in your wallet presents some pretty fun opportunities to make people laugh. When looking for a one, pull one of these out with a puzzled look on your face. The look on the cashier's face is priceless!
Sammy
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Aug 23, 2009 06:16PM)
Take the sheets to a picture framing business. They have all the equipment to cut the bills as you instruct them. I know a magician who did this and it only cost him about $20.00. Of course you can buy equipment as suggested above, but for a one time deal, this is the way to go, because if you make a mistake, the bills are trashed.

You can get the bill sheets from the government. They sell them. Go to this web site: http://www.moneyfactory.gov/store/section.cfm/69
Message: Posted by: defconskylude (Aug 26, 2009 03:06PM)
I just picked up a $5.00 mismade bill and a $1.00 mismade bill for $44.00

Geez!
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Aug 29, 2009 09:38PM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-26 16:06, defconskylude wrote:
I just picked up a $5.00 mismade bill and a $1.00 mismade bill for $44.00

Geez!
[/quote]

That's pretty much the going rate. If you don't plan to give them away then these will last you for a few years. Overall, a good investment!

Sammy
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Apr 16, 2010 08:32PM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-01 17:30, Exitmat wrote:
I just ordered a sheet of uncut $1 so that I can cut (I might tear a few as a T&R plot but I want to cut most of them) my own mis-made bills to give away. My question is, for those that have done it, what is the best and most practical way to cut the bills? Do scissors work okay or is it better to use an x-acto knife or blade paper trimmer? What is the best way to measure the bills out? Lining up the mis-made bill I have and cutting one at a time or using a pencil and measuring it out and cutting a bunch at once?

Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
[/quote]

I know this may be off topic, but WHERE did you purchase them? And were they expensive?
Message: Posted by: bunkyhenry (Apr 16, 2010 09:42PM)
Scissors work fine. Use a good, large pair and just trace lightly with pencil.
Message: Posted by: Oliver Ross (Apr 17, 2010 02:28AM)
ExitMat,

Try to contact Jonathan Philippe via PM here on the café. He has recently made 10,- € mismade bills from a sheet. I got one and they are very professionally cut.

Oliver.
Message: Posted by: jazzy snazzy (Apr 17, 2010 06:06AM)
Invest in a plastic cutting mat, x-acto knife with VERY SHARP #11 blades, a "non-photo blue" or light blue pencil, an Artgum eraser and a metal yardstick or straight edge.

Use a flat, solid surface such as the floor.
Lightly mark out the desired cuts using any regular bill as a template. You only need to mark the top and bottom and each side of the sheet as long as you can keep it lined up straight.
The light blue pencil will erase easily with an artgum eraser.

Cut the long dimensions first using your knee or an assistant to hold the straight edge down firmly, leaving the top and bottom uncut so the sheet stays together.

Make sure the blade is tight against the straight edge as you make the cut.
Use the regular bill to check your position for exact size before each cut.

Rotate the sheet and make the horizontal cuts the same way.

Voila!

Some people actually use this stuff for gift-wrap paper.
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Apr 19, 2010 09:34AM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-16 21:32, daffydoug wrote:

I know this may be off topic, but WHERE did you purchase them? And were they expensive?
[/quote]

http://www.moneyfactorystore.gov/
Message: Posted by: Steven Keyl (Apr 19, 2010 10:07AM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-29 22:38, Sammy J. wrote:
[quote]
On 2009-08-26 16:06, defconskylude wrote:
I just picked up a $5.00 mismade bill and a $1.00 mismade bill for $44.00

Geez!
[/quote]

That's pretty much the going rate. If you don't plan to give them away then these will last you for a few years. Overall, a good investment!

Sammy
[/quote]

I've got several mismade $1's left over from the last sheet I cut. If anyone wants one for $10 send me a PM. I find that I use the same bill over and over so I don't really go through them very fast.
Message: Posted by: daffydoug (Apr 19, 2010 10:10AM)
Thanks for the link. Whew! Looks like you are paying a couple bucks for each individual bill!
Message: Posted by: tommeepickles (Apr 19, 2010 12:58PM)
You could also tear them carefully into mismade bills and then it becomes a torn and mismade miracle with torn edges on the outside and borders on the inside. After the switch it will look like the same bill and you can have them sign it before you make your magic moment.
Message: Posted by: Steven Keyl (Apr 20, 2010 11:35AM)
The torn edges idea is excellent! It doesn't fit with my current presentation but it's still a great idea.
Message: Posted by: Mithrandir (Apr 20, 2010 05:35PM)
I know this sounds dumb , and correct me if I'm wrong but , out of a sheet of 32 you can only get 24 mismade bills .... Right ?

Either way it's still economically better than buying one mismade bill at a time .
Message: Posted by: David P (May 11, 2010 09:14AM)
Right, you get 24 Mis-Made Bills out of a sheet of 32. Cost from mint is $55. The sheet is 4 bills across X 8 down. After cutting you will have 16 loose left and righthalves that could be used as parts for a torn and restored. I don't know if this would be legal, but you might tape these halves together and then use as cash ($8).
Message: Posted by: MikeHall (May 11, 2010 11:29AM)
Actually 21 mismade bills from a sheet of thirty two.
Message: Posted by: David P (May 11, 2010 04:56PM)
You are right Mike, 21 not 24. I wasn't thinking about the cuttings off the bottom and top of the sheet. My mistake.
Message: Posted by: Bob Johnston (May 15, 2010 01:11AM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-11 10:14, David P wrote:
Right, you get 24 Mis-Made Bills out of a sheet of 32. Cost from mint is $55. The sheet is 4 bills across X 8 down. After cutting you will have 16 loose left and righthalves that could be used as parts for a torn and restored. I don't know if this would be legal, but you might tape these halves together and then use as cash ($8).
[/quote]
Taping those trim pieces together is a great idea, especially if you’re big on ripping people off. The person, who finally decides to take the bill to a bank for a nice crisp new bill, will find that the bill is not legal.

The first thing a bank teller (that’s awake) will do is check the serial numbers of the bill and he/she will find they do not match. At that point, they keep the bill.

Bob
Message: Posted by: David P (May 18, 2010 03:59PM)
I'm not big on "ripping people off". For a few $1s ? I was just wondering if a bank would take them. I don't know for sure, but understand that you can tape a torn bill together, even a severely mangled one or you can return a partial bill and a bank will honor that. Does anyone here know? My next project involves a whole sheet of $100's for Mis Mades.
Message: Posted by: rjthomp (May 19, 2010 11:30AM)
The official standard is that to be reimbursed you need to have "clearly more than half of the bill". So you would not be able to redeem these bills... Taping a bill with different serial numbers on each half would be a no-no...

Se the following:
http://www.bep.treas.gov/uscurrency/damagedcurrency.html
Message: Posted by: David P (May 19, 2010 06:00PM)
Rjthomp - Thanks for the US treasury damaged bill redemption information. Good to know the scoop. I was kidding about the 100's. Ones are more my speed.
Message: Posted by: rjthomp (May 25, 2010 12:00AM)
The official standard is that to be reimbursed you need to have "clearly more than half of the bill". So you would not be able to redeem these bills... Taping a bill with different serial numbers on each half would be a no-no...

Se the following:
http://www.bep.treas.gov/uscurrency/damagedcurrency.html
Message: Posted by: chennell (Jul 13, 2010 07:21AM)
I live in the UK and have always wanted to do this effect, the only problem is I cannot find anyone who makes or sells the gimmick in a £10 note. If anyone could point me in the right dirrection with a PM I'd really apriciate it.
Message: Posted by: writeall (Jul 13, 2010 01:41PM)
Just curious. When you do a give away with mis-made, do you bother to make the serial numbers the same or just don't worry about it?
Message: Posted by: writeall (Jul 13, 2010 06:24PM)
I had another look at an uncut sheet. The 'erasing' method wouldn't work, so matching serial numbers is out. I assumed they would be sequential on the diagonal, which is wrong.
Message: Posted by: Tonylew (Jul 24, 2010 03:22PM)
AFter examining the options, I have decided that the T square/Exacto Knife approach seems to be the best way to go. I checked with my local Staples Office Supply and found that their cutter only takes up to a 24" sheet which is 1/2 " less than needed. If we could have squeezed the bill sheet in, they would have charged me $12 for the job. Framing stores wanted at least $25.

I already have a cutting board and found a choice of two 48" T squares at Home Depot for under $12 each. The Exacto knife can be picked up for a couple of bucks. If you would like to just give a Mismade Bill away (about $2.62 each if you make your own) here's a non-magical way of doing it. Tell the recipient that while you were making a smoothie the other day, you dropped a dollar bill in the blender by mistake,

IMO this is a humorous way of explaining the existence of the bill. I use these bills occasionally as tips to people who are not allowed to take cash, such as casino pit bosses. Very often they do not have the time to watch me do a bill switch, but they love the novelty of the mismade bills.

FWIW I once gave one of those excellent $1000 fake bills to a shift manager in Reno and got comped for a very nice room in return, not a bad return for a twenty-five cent investment!

Here is a way to get some mileage from the two long edge pieces that are left after you create the mismade bills. Cut off a section which contains two halves. Then approach anybody who has access to a cash drawer and ask if he/her can give you change for two half dollars. I Have gotten some good laughs from doing this. This usually brings on such questions as "Is that real money?" or "How did you get that?" Of course you would want to make sure that the person is not busy when you try the gag.

Right after it was published in the late 1970's, I purchased "The Hundred Dollar Bill Switch" by Mike Kozlowski. I have always done this effect *without the thumb tip* following the suggestion of Mike in the next to last page of the manuscript.

I was fortunate to make the acquaintance of the late, great Larry Jennings when I visited Lake Tahoe. While we were chatting at a bar, I had the nerve to show the effect to Larry. He reacted by saying, "That's very nice but you're leaving out an essential move." He then proceeded to show me how to display both sides of the bill in a very natural way before and after the switch. Several of my fellow magicians have found this to be very impressive.

About 15 years ago, I went from the $100 bill switch to the mismade bill, using the inside/out presentation. This gets just as strong a reaction as the original while saving me from tying up a $100 bill.

Now I have come up with a new idea. While the $100 bill gets more common as the dollar gets ever weaker, the public in general erroneously feels that the $2 bill is quite rare. Therefore, I am about to purchase a sheet of thirty-two $2 bills ($90 postpaid) from the Bureau of Engraving to use for making a set of mismade $2 bills.

I can then patter that the "rare" $2 bill has magical properties, one of which is that it can be turned inside/out. There is also an additional advantage to using the $2 bill. Since very few people have one of these in their possession, I can now start out with my own perfectly creased bill.

I also hope to be able to sell enough of the mismade $2 bills to recover my $90 investment.
Message: Posted by: MT (Jul 31, 2010 01:26AM)
Good idea. You can make your own mismade bill. But if you only need one or two it might not be worth it to buy a whole sheet.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Aug 30, 2010 02:37AM)
Another good gag is in the Tarbell Course. It is only a paragraph long. It is using a roll of bills. If you only want a few bills, several rows of the bills can be left long and connected. Then roll them and put a rubber band around them. Pull them out to pay for a meal. Tell the casher to cut off how much she needs.

Another use is if you have a cut-no-cut scissors. Pull out the string of bill and have some cut off 2 or 3 dollars. Comedy gag at its best.

Don't know why but during WW2 people believed $2 bills were unlucky, so no one wanted to keep them.
Message: Posted by: Alan Munro (Nov 25, 2010 05:52AM)
[quote]
On 2009-08-12 11:01, TC Ryder wrote:
Sammy,

Have you tried to make a Quadrabill out of the ones you made?

TC
[/quote]
Isn't that the gimmicked version? You could make one, but the Mismade Bill really begs to be examined. Some of the impact of the effect comes from the examination.