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Topic: What is my book worth?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 15, 2010 02:40PM)
This is a question that may be difficult to answer. Doing a simple search on Google or Amazon may not provide a satisfactory answer, because most book dealers do not sell magic books. In fact, many do not have any idea what a magic book is worth, because they don't have any magic catalogs. So they use what my old biology teacher used to call "a posteriori knowledge" to price used magic books.

Combine this with what is, in many cases, inaccurate information concerning what is and is not in print and/or what is or is not available from magic dealers, and the whole thing can become quite confusing.

The main things that drive the price of magic books are desirability and availability. When Frank Garcia was alive, his [i]Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic[/i] sold for about $15 or $20. Since sponge ball magic is very popular and this book is no longer available unless someone either dies or decides to sell it to raise some money, you can expect to pay around $400 for it, more if it is autographed.

Michael Ammar's [i]The Complete Cups and Balls[/i] is another example of a book that has gone out of print that commands a higher price than it did when it was first printed. Originally, it sold for $50 or so. Expect to pay $150 to $200 for it. If the book has some interesting provenance, it may command a higher price.

Borodin's [i]Sheherazade[/i] has been out of print for several years now. It sold for $45.00 new. Now it goes for about $200.

Some publishers do not let their books go completely out of print. Magic, Inc. still publishes their more popular classics, such as [i]The Sponge Book[/i] and [i]Ireland's Original Cups and Balls Routines[/i]. Although the prices on these books have gone up, new copies are available for about $10.00.

Some books have several editions, and some of these are worth more than others. For example, the first edition of one of the Derren Brown books is worth two or three times more than the second edition. That's partially because the two editions are vastly different. Some of the more controversial material in the first edition was removed from subsequent ones.

What about the age of the book? That's a good question. Do you know the actual age of the book or are you going by the copyright date? The copyright date only tells you the EARLIEST the book could have been published. There are some other clues.

Look for the address of the seller. If it has the postal zone, such as Walnut Hills 3, California, then it was printed after May 5, 1943. If it has a Zip code, then it was printed sometime after 1963. European postal codes can offer you some information as well.

Age is not the only factor that determines value. If the initial printing of a book was extremely large, an early edition might not be worth that much more than a later one. Also, a newer book in perfect condition may be worth more than an older book in horrible condition. Condition is a very important factor.

So, here's the idea with this thread. If you have a book that you want a value for, submit it to the thread, and someone will see if they can find a reasonable value for it. If I put a price on a book, the value will be based on what it has brought at auction recently or what it has sold for in the for sale section of the Magic Café.
Message: Posted by: Merenkov (Apr 15, 2010 03:44PM)
Cool idea for a thread. Here are a couple of books in my collection that have confounded me, as I've heard wildly divergent opinions of their market value: Bizarre and Cantrip Codex, both by Tony 'Doc' Shiels. I purchased both in the mid-nineties. Bizarre is copyrighted 1988; Cantrip Codex is copyrighted 1989. I'd appreciate anyone's thoughts on the value of each of these.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 15, 2010 05:22PM)
Those are difficult to price for the reason you have given. Another reason is that some of the listings have errors in them. For example, one listing states that [i]Cantrip Codex[/i] was published in London by Tony Andruzzi. It was more likely published in Chicago, because that's where Andruzzi lived. Where it is printed or manufactured and where it is published are not the same thing.

Anyway, I would say that, judging from prices I have seen here and there, the Codex would be worth somewhere between $150 and $250. [i]Bizarre[/i] would probably go for about $65 to $100.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Apr 15, 2010 07:19PM)
Both are on Ebay with no takers. Codex at $200 and Bizarre at $65.00 and will take less for it.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 15, 2010 07:55PM)
I'm using data from several different sources. I did see those eBay listings.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Apr 15, 2010 08:54PM)
I'm using a few sources too. Asking prices and selling prices really can't be compared, so I went with the easiest to acquire on short notice.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 15, 2010 10:38PM)
I know. For example, Martinka had not sold any copies of either of these books, but there were some copies that showed up on various incarnations of Amazon.

Right now, it's a buyer's market. It's that way for all the collectibles. I wish I'd held on to my Harbin book which I sold a few years before it went through the roof. But I didn't get hurt on it.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Apr 16, 2010 06:23AM)
I saw a Bizarre sell on Ebay for $45.00 3 weeks ago and only one bidder. This may be the price for it now.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Apr 16, 2010 06:49AM)
Houdini, by Gresham. First edition. Excellent condition with dust jacket in fine condition.

Great thread, Bill. Thankyou in advance.

Rodney
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 16, 2010 01:30PM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-16 07:23, Kevin Connolly wrote:
I saw a Bizarre sell on Ebay for $45.00 3 weeks ago and only one bidder. This may be the price for it now.
[/quote]

This is a common misconception. The last auction doesn't determine "the" price. There is no "the" price. It all depends on whether anyone other than that one bidder saw the listing. Sometimes the listing itself determines the pricing of a book -- or for that matter -- the range of pricing.

Here's an example. This is kind of esoteric, but it will give you an idea of the idiosyncracies of auctions. From 2004 through 2008, the average ebay auction price for a set of Paul Fox cups by Danny Dew in almost any condition unless they were just beat to pieces was about $600. I know. I bought most of them. Some went for as much as $1000, others for about $400. The $1000 cups were the exception, not the rule. The ones that Jeff Busby made usually went for less, but I think we both know why.

The best of those cups were some that were spun for Danny by the original Rings and Things (rather than Perigee). They had that Magipoxy finish. I had the sets that were owned by David Roth and a couple of other well-known magicians. The normal price for these was $750 - $1000 a set, depending on provenance. A set came up that was listed by a magic company out of Ca. They didn't know what they had. Their listing made it somewhat doubtful to anyone exactly what these cups were. I sent them a message explaining what they were, and the idiots didn't post the information to the listing. Since they didn't make the change, I bought the cups for $250, and consequently traded them to a fellow in Dresden for a set of cups that were unobtainable at any price over here. If they had changed the listing, someone else would have gotten them for considerably more money than I had paid.

This did not lessen the value of any of the Paul Fox cups that have sold since then, although the economic downturn that followed a few months later didn't give us any help on auction prices!

BTW, do you have a listing number for the copy of [i]Bizarre[/i] that you saw on eBay? I did five different searches on the completed items, using Shiels on one, Bizarre on the second and Bizzare on the third, Bizzarre on the fourth and Sheils on the fifth, and it didn't show up. Several other bizarre magic books did, but not the Shiels book called [i]Bizarre[/i].

[quote]
On 2010-04-16 07:49, magicfish wrote:
Houdini, by Gresham. First edition. Excellent condition with dust jacket in fine condition.

Great thread, Bill. Thankyou in advance.

Rodney
[/quote]

I'm glad you asked about this one, because it gives me a chance to make a few points about editions and printings. First, I checked with Richard Hatch, because he has a copy that sounds pretty much like yours -- it's a first edition, second printing. He wants $25.00 for it.

He also suggested that I run a search on bookfinder.com , which is a really great site to show the range of prices. Bookfinder.com had a couple of listings that were really wacky. There were a couple of 1960 editions that were listed as first editions. One of these was obviously the first UK edition, although I seem to remember that Holt had an English publishing branch of record.

Another had the notation "A First edition is always a First printing." Nope. Look at [i]Greater Magic[/i]. It went through several editions, each with more than one printing, except, perhaps, the Reader's Digest five volume set. BTW, there are people who collect editions of [i]Greater Magic[/i] and editions of all the Hoffmann works. An edition is a changed version of a book.

So, to answer your question -- a copy of this type would sell at retail for roughly $15 - $45. The book does have acceptance outside the magic community, that is, there are people who collect Gresham.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Apr 16, 2010 04:38PM)
Thanks, Bill, that's helpful. I'm particularly fond of this copy because of where, how , and when I acquired it. I admire it as one of those little gems of my collection. Like I said, Bill, I'm excited about this thread and I hope you don't mind if I throw a few more at you.

Rodney
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 16, 2010 05:38PM)
It's a good book. Until some of the more recent books about Houdini were published, it was probably the best general biography of Houdini in print. At least there were fewer errors, intentional or otherwise, than in the Kelloch book and some of the others.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (Apr 17, 2010 12:48AM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-15 23:38, Bill Palmer wrote:
I wish I'd held on to my Harbin book which I sold a few years before it went through the roof. But I didn't get hurt on it.
[/quote]
As I recall when The Magic of Robert Harbin first came out, you could buy it for $60.00. Now it is in the thousands. Nice appreciation huh?
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 17, 2010 01:35AM)
Actually, I think the price was closer to $75.00. Now, even the fakes cost more than that!

A friend of mine is a well-known collector. He has a legit Harbin book, which belonged to a very famous illusionist. It has all of the packing materials, etc. He also has a couple of fakes which he uses primarily to educate other collectors.

The late Al Mann was reputedly responsible for the most popular of the fakes. A few years ago, about 20 of them surfaced at a bookstore in San Antonio. Naturally, they all got bought very quickly. Then one of the fellows in the local magic club inquired as to the source of the books, and they got traced back to someone in San Antonio who had them and several more in a warehouse.

And so did the story of how they got printed, etc. There were a number of people involved in it.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Apr 22, 2010 04:50PM)
Great Hoaxes & Famous Imposters-
Forgers,Swindlers,Robbers, and Con Artists Throughout History
By Carlson Wade. I love this book. Excellent condition. Hardbound with green boards and green dustjacket. Published by Jonathon David Publishing. Copyright 1976. Printed in the United States. I doubt its very valuable but it is to me. Is mine a first edition? Any info is appreciated.

Rodney
Message: Posted by: Donal Chayce (Apr 22, 2010 08:52PM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-17 02:35, Bill Palmer wrote:
A friend of mine is a well-known collector. He has a legit Harbin book, which belonged to a very famous illusionist. It has all of the packing materials, etc. He also has a couple of fakes which he uses primarily to educate other collectors.
[/quote]

I purchased my copy of the Harbin book from a well-known magic craftsman a few years ago. It, too, came with the original packing materials, certificate of authenticity, etc. It also came with a handwritten letter from Harbin to the original purchaser (the craftsman).

What's most interesting--and intriguing--to me about that letter is that in it Harbin states that his T&R newspaper is the best thing in the book.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 23, 2010 01:51AM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-22 17:50, magicfish wrote:
Great Hoaxes & Famous Imposters-
Forgers,Swindlers,Robbers, and Con Artists Throughout History
By Carlson Wade. I love this book. Excellent condition. Hardbound with green boards and green dustjacket. Published by Jonathon David Publishing. Copyright 1976. Printed in the United States. I doubt its very valuable but it is to me. Is mine a first edition? Any info is appreciated.

Rodney
[/quote]

To know whether it's a first edition, I would need to see the information around the copyright notice. Often, it will say "First printing" or "First Edition." It very well may be. It was reprinted in 1989.

It's not a particularly pricey book, though -- about $15 to $20.

One thing to remember about the value of any collectible. It is very unusual for the value of any collectible to be chiseled in stone. All sorts of things can affect the market value of a collectible item, be it a book, a magic trick, a coin or a piece of real estate.

If you live in a world where food is in extremely short supply, a Harbin book would be worth a lot less than a loaf of bread.
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 23, 2010 09:57PM)
I have a copy of Harry Lorayne's book "The Himber Wallet Book" and am totally confused by what I am finding out there, as I intend to sell this book, along with a full size himber wallet from Fun Inc.

The search that I have done shows prices as varied as $35 to $100, all with S&H extra. The $35 one is from a magic store selling copies of the book and does mention that you have to reserve it, as they are out of stock.

As for the $100 one, it says it is a "deluxe" edition, with Lorayne's signature and numbered. He also says this is also in "New" condition and OOP! Huh? Is that possible? While I would never say mine is new, I know that the condition of the book would warrant saying, possibly, used, but in "like new" condition as there are no condition issues that I can spot.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 23, 2010 10:20PM)
If you have a book that has no dings, underlines, marginal notes, and it has a clean cover, and the spine isn't shaken, then it might be listed as in "new" condition, even if it has been out of print for some time. I have a copy of Michael Ammar's Complete Cups and Balls book, a deluxe edition, that has been unwrapped, but has not been opened more than slightly. The book is out of print. It is in perfect condition. I would consider a description of it as a used book in "new" condition to be accurate; however, most people who sell used books would list a book like that as "mint" condition or "like new" condition.

But here's the catch. Are all the corners crisp? Are the top and bottom of the spine crisp? People who purchase books are often quite picky. I have a copy of the Deluxe edition of the complete Vernon set that came wrapped. I opened it to find that the cover was defective. I couldn't return it because I got it from a third party.

As far as the value of this book is concerned, mention Harry Lorayne's name a few more times.

Here, I'll help.

Harry Lorayne.

Harry Lorayne.

Harry Lorayne regularly checks the Café and Genii Forum looking to see who has mentioned him. He will see this, and unless he is a complete sadist, he will tell us what he thinks the book is worth.

BTW, I have 24 copies of [i]Final Curtain[/i]. Since no more of them are being printed, it is out of print. But they are absolutely new. So, what should I call them?
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 24, 2010 07:18AM)
Thanks for the information. Hope Harry shows up and gives his opinion. Should be interesting.

As for the book, I looked for all of those things and, so far, haven't found any. Didn't think about the spine though. Have been very careful not to open the book too far, as that does cause wear issues on the spine.

Another thing I have to ask is about different versions of a book. As an example, L&L is publishing a book called "The Complete Ganson Magic Teach-In Series". They have two "flavors" of this book, the "worker" for about $80 and a "deluxe" edition with extras for about $175. When looking for books with possible collecting value in mind for the future, what should one consider?

Also, I have heard some people be of the mindset to buy two copies of the same book. The first would be a worker, one you carry around, read, use, etc. The other would be stored away somewhere that it remains wrapped and, possibly, out of sunlight so as to minimize any harmful effects to it. Any thoughts on that subject?

Just to let you know, I did try bookfinder for the Harry Lorayne book and could not find it among the fairly long list of books put out there by him. Was really surprised by that.
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (Apr 24, 2010 09:12AM)
Okito on Magic - first ed. Signed by Okito.
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Apr 24, 2010 09:33AM)
Okay, I don't understand what Bill Palmer
Bill Palmer
Bill Palmer
Bill Palmer Means, but...
I do have just a few copies left of the Deluxe Collector's Edition of THE HIMBER WALLET book. Numbered, signed, in slip cases, brand new. You can have a copy for $95.00 plus the inevitable pstg/hndlng. When the few I have are gone, you know that price will probably go way up. Anyway, if you want one, or have any questions, go to my personal email address, listed under this post with the word "earthlink" in it. Best - HARRY L.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 24, 2010 11:03AM)
See. It worked!

It's a medieval method for conjuring a spirit. You say the name three times, and if the planets are in the proper alignment, the spirit will show up.

Thanks for the information, Harry.

[quote]
On 2010-04-24 10:12, RiffRaff wrote:
Okito on Magic - first ed. Signed by Okito.
[/quote]

There are a couple of different versions of this book. One is a deluxe, numbered, limited edition. Another is just the standard edition. Figure somewhere around $200 - $300, depending on condition.

These don't come up often. I found a few of them on the Martinka site.
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (Apr 24, 2010 11:27AM)
Bill, thanks for the book appraisal.
Regarding your incantation, I think any planet alignment will work.

Posted: Apr 24, 2010 12:41pm
I heard that if you stand in front of a mirror with the lights out, and you perform a sleight while chanting 'Harry Lorayne' three times you will conjure an apparition that will tell you where to find his superior method.
It's true. It happened to a friend of a friend of mine!

Love your work, Harry.
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Apr 24, 2010 11:49AM)
That works, RiffRaff - but a better method is to simply get hold of (read "buy") my books! (Careful; some have been known to disappear while chanting my name in front of a mirror in the dark!)
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 24, 2010 12:04PM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-24 12:27, RiffRaff wrote:
Bill, thanks for the book appraisal.
Regarding your incantation, I think any planet alignment will work.
[/quote]

Please don't regard any of the statements I make concerning book values as "appraisals." I just look for past performances of various books.
Message: Posted by: motown (Apr 24, 2010 01:12PM)
When I lived in Detroit I used to regularly search the used book stores for quality magic books. I found many great books that were no longer available from traditional magic shops. Before the Internet age and Abe books, I would say the books were sold at a reasonable price. The prices skyrocketed after Abe books as many of these used book dealers based their prices on Abes.

Many times I would ask a dealer why a book was priced so high and get back Abe books.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 24, 2010 03:09PM)
There was a used book dealer in Houston, back during the 1970's who occasionally got hold of magic books. She always priced them very high, because she had no idea what they sold for. Often, these books were priced considerably above retail.

The proprietor did pay the highest prices in town for used books, so she had to charge a high price for them when she sold them, and she had no way of finding out what these books were worth.

So I got her some magic catalogs so she could price the books with a certain amount of accuracy. This had an added benefit. She had a customer in France who collected Houdini material. This opened up an avenue for her that she hadn't had access to before.

Some of the internet book sellers do make mistakes, though. In 1965, I wrote a book on how to play the banjo. A couple of years ago, it appeared at a used book store for $1995.00. It has been out of print for some time, but with more than 20,000 copies in circulation, it is hard to imagine this book selling for such a high price.

So I e-mailed the seller and asked about the price. They had the decimal place in the wrong spot. The book went from $1995.00 to $19.95 in a matter of minutes!
Message: Posted by: MagiClyde (Apr 24, 2010 11:17PM)
Looking over my book carefully, I did see a pencil mark telling me that the book was $35 NEW, which is probably the price I paid for it. Thanks for the help.

Am still curious as to my last question about what to look for in terms of future book purchases and what may be collectable.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 25, 2010 12:42AM)
Any time you see a book that comes out in a solid gold box, buy it. Keep the box and toss the book.

That's the short answer. The serious answer is "Who knows?" I certainly don't. It all depends on demand. If you are buying books for an investment, you are doing it for the wrong reason. Buy books because you like them.

In fact, if you are buying ANYTHING as an investment, and it isn't food futures, oil futures, water futures, gold futures or real estate, you don't really understand what to invest in in the first place.

If you want to get the maximum return for books you think you might want to save as possible investments, condition would be near the top of the list. So would the number of copies printed. However, there are magic books that had very limited printings that are not worth much, because nobody wants them. There are also books that are quite collectible because they are about a topic that is "hot" now.

That's where the laws of supply and demand come in. If there are more people who want the book than there are copies of the book, then it will go up in price. But bear in mind that if it gets reprinted, it may go down in value.

In 1972, [i]Greater Magic[/i], any one volume edition, retailed for about $185. It wasn't a rare book. But it was a [i]desirable[/i] book. The Kaufman reprint came out. The value dropped a little, but it's back up again. People still want the original copies.
Message: Posted by: motown (Apr 25, 2010 01:19PM)
Bill,

I picked up a numbered 1st edition of Paul LePaul's book from a used book dealer for $40 or $45 dollars.
This was before the internet. There were 500 printed. Had the internet and Abe books been around, I'm sure that book would have been priced at over $100.

And that's just one example.

I think. the internet has definitely made it harder on the pocketbook.

Craig
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 25, 2010 03:25PM)
I'm not surprised that it was that inexpensive. The LePaul book has largely been overlooked by card workers of the past two generations, because some of it has been "improved upon" by more recent performers. However, LePaul did a lot of his work in a stage situation. Some of his sleights were specifically for that kind of setup. Look at his version of the Diagonal Palm Shift. It's not as elegant as the Erdnase version, but it is much more suitable for stage work than the Erdnase DPS.
Message: Posted by: ekins (Apr 25, 2010 11:46PM)
[quote]
I think. the internet has definitely made it harder on the pocketbook.
[/quote]

I believe this has gone both ways. Buyers are now able to more easily determine a fair market price and are less likely to be fooled by the "Rare, Out of Print" sales pitch and the associated inflated price.

But I agree that as a buyer you're less likely to come across that great find like you were several years ago. For example, I bought a copy of Cards as Weapons (when they were going for $150-$200) for $15.

-Brian
Message: Posted by: Clay Shevlin (Apr 26, 2010 12:25AM)
Here is an article which may be helpful to those interested in learning about collecting, pricing and such things:
http://www.geniimagazine.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Forum=12&topic=000578&Number=0&site_id=1#import

Regarding RiffRaff's question about [b]Okito on Magic[/b], all 200 numbered copies of the "deluxe edition" were signed by Okito, and were issued in quarter blue cloth over gold pebbled paper over boards, with a red leatherette slipcase. The basic issue of the book was bound in red cloth with a profile of Okito embossed in gold on the front cover, with a red and white dust jacket.

RiffRaff doesn't mention the condition of the book, whether it has the slipcase, or even if it was one of the "deluxe" copies, so I'd be hard pressed to consider an estimate of value without that basic information. As Bill Palmer wisely suggests, the condition of a book can be critical when it comes to value.
Message: Posted by: RiffRaff (Apr 26, 2010 07:50AM)
Clay,
Thanks for the extra info.
It's not the deluxe edition.
It has a red cover with the gold embossed Okito profile (about the size of a dollar coin).
The cover is not in good shape. I had purchased a second book just for the cover, and then I discoved that the second book was a second edition, and the cover was different than the 1st edition cover.
The condition is excellent (I'm not using that term the same way that book collectors use it - It looks excellent to my untrained eye).
Okito signed it in blue ink as follows:
To: Bill Reid Esq.
With best wishes.
Okito.
Dec 1952.

(The word 'Okito' is underlined).

Posted: Apr 26, 2010 8:52am
I'm not sure that my post was clear. If not I'll clarify:
The dust jacket (cover) is not in great condition; the book itself is.
Message: Posted by: Josh Chaikin (Apr 27, 2010 02:49PM)
What a great idea for a thread, Bill. A few years back, I purchased two issues of West Coast Quarterly from Andy Greget (which seems to comprise a full run). Very few people seem to know much about this publication, in spite of there being great material in there. The price I paid leads me to believe that it may not be worth much, the material and contributors, however, makes me think differently, though.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Apr 28, 2010 12:40AM)
I really can't claim this as my idea. The idea came from Merenkov.
Message: Posted by: Marshall Thornside (Apr 28, 2010 02:07AM)
I will say the value of book is interesting.
Because I know that Dr. Albo's books are
usually through the roof. If they are inscribed,
much more. These are't older books only
published int he past 30 years or so but
they are complete by volume.

Where as the magic annuals don't hold up as
much value as does a inscribed set.

Yet a leather bound edition of the first
so many Jinx (I think or maybe Genii) magazine
can be worth quite a bit.

I think much of it can be determined by demand.
When one knows that its in demand people will
pay (almost) anything for it.
Message: Posted by: Clay Shevlin (May 1, 2010 12:06AM)
^^^ Frances, I don't think Bob's books are much more valuable inscribed, at least based on what I've seen for sales. And what do you mean by "complete by volume"?

Which annuals are you talking about? Goldston? Findlay? Magic, Inc?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 1, 2010 03:12AM)
I found someone who collects a very narrow slice of magical publications. Yet he still manages to have a very large collection of material.

He collects Karl Fulves -- not just the books and periodicals Karl wrote or edited, but also articles, reviews, places Karl is mentioned, etc.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (May 1, 2010 08:07AM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-01 04:12, Bill Palmer wrote:
I found someone who collects a very narrow slice of magical publications. Yet he still manages to have a very large collection of material.

He collects Karl Fulves -- not just the books and periodicals Karl wrote or edited, but also articles, reviews, places Karl is mentioned, etc.
[/quote]
Interesting. I wonder why he collects Fulves. I know people collect everything from bananas to irons to brooms- who knows why. But I'd be very interested to know why Fulves.

Rod.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 1, 2010 10:25AM)
It might be because Fulves is so prolific. He actually may have written more about magic than Walter Gibson.
Message: Posted by: Rennie (May 1, 2010 11:09AM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-26 00:46, ekins wrote:
[quote]
For example, I bought a copy of Cards as Weapons (when they were going for $150-$200) for $15.

-Brian
[/quote]
I feel $15.00 is the actual true value of that book. I think it is the most overpriced book I ever saw. Contains no magic, but a few nude shots..Crazy!!
Rennie
Message: Posted by: ekins (May 1, 2010 02:32PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-01 12:09, Rennie wrote:
I feel $15.00 is the actual true value of that book. I think it is the most overpriced book I ever saw. Contains no magic, but a few nude shots..Crazy!!
Rennie
[/quote]

No disagreement there, but on the other hand if I can turn around and resell it to make some money for some good material I'm not going to complain.

-Brian
Message: Posted by: Rennie (May 1, 2010 09:42PM)
Brian,
I could not agree more. Sell it and use the money to buy a book that has something in it you can use.
Rennie
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 1, 2010 10:59PM)
This illustrates a principle that occurs in the market sometimes. It's basically a "bump." This happens when someone wants something so badly that he will pay ANYTHING for it. Actually, it happens when two or more people want something so badly that they will pay ANYTHING for it.

Case in point -- [i]The Red Book of Mentalism[/i] sold on eBay a few years back for $400.00 +. Then everybody wanted one. So [i]Prism[/i] was printed. I don't know how well it sold, but the fact is that the fellow who paid $400+ for the Red Book did so because his time was worth more to him than $400 an hour.

A set of Ross Bertram cups went for about $1800 on Martinka a few years ago. Then the cups started decreasing in value. Now they are about the same as they cost right before the big bump.
Message: Posted by: gaddy (May 3, 2010 05:09PM)
As a used/antique book buyer for a large Chicago bookseller for several years, I feel I'm in a position to say that magic books are the some of the most schizophrenically valued books in the world! There is very little rhyme or reason to how/why some books are so highly prized and some are not, except for usefulness and fashionability.

Not that there's anything wrong with it, but it's very curious that fashion plays such a large role in the value of magic books.
Message: Posted by: Mark R. Williams (May 4, 2010 02:06PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-03 18:09, gaddy wrote:
As a used/antique book buyer for a large Chicago bookseller for several years, I feel I'm in a position to say that magic books are the some of the most schizophrenically valued books in the world! There is very little rhyme or reason to how/why some books are so highly prized and some are not, except for usefulness and fashionability.

Not that there's anything wrong with it, but it's very curious that fashion plays such a large role in the value of magic books.
[/quote]

I agree but isn't that usually true for any category of books? I collect Civil War books of various types including army manuals of the period and the same can be noted of them. The prices can be wildly divergent and the determining factors are not always evident. Heck, just look up the price of almost ANY book on an online book sitr such as ABE's and you will see prices ranging from giveaway to assinine!!!!

Regards,

mark
Message: Posted by: Clay Shevlin (May 5, 2010 12:59AM)
I suspect there’s a lot of truth to Mark’s observation about the variability of book pricing. That said, to address gaddy’s comment about the schizophrenia of magic book pricing, I’ve often been amazed at the variance between the pricing by general book dealers and specialist magic book dealers. The only realistic explanation I can think of for this is that magic books are, by the “underground,” secretive nature of magic, seldom encountered in great quantities by general book dealers. Amongst specialist magic book dealers, prices are generally consistent. And of course, as Bill Palmer says, there are the “bumps” in prices as certain authors and sub-genres of magic books wax and wane in popularity. Goldston and Hoffmann were once all the rage a couple of decades ago, but demand – and thus prices – have tailed off.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 5, 2010 01:36PM)
There is also a factor that includes the various categories that books fit into. Some people who are laymen are Houdini collectors. If you have a Houdini book for sale, it may appeal to magicians, collectors of Judaica, collectors of "roaring 20's" books, spy novels, you name it. So, at an auction, a Houdini book may conceivably have a much larger market than a book like Erdnase.
Message: Posted by: Josh Chaikin (May 5, 2010 05:39PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-01 12:09, Rennie wrote:
[quote]
On 2010-04-26 00:46, ekins wrote:
[quote]
For example, I bought a copy of Cards as Weapons (when they were going for $150-$200) for $15.

-Brian
[/quote]
I feel $15.00 is the actual true value of that book. I think it is the most overpriced book I ever saw. Contains no magic, but a few nude shots..Crazy!!
Rennie
[/quote]

I was talking with John Greget about that book a few years back. He had a copy that he had sold for $800. Of course the fact that it had a stamp on the title page that read "From the library of Doug Henning" may have had one or two things to do with it.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jun 20, 2010 08:59PM)
-Louis Tannen's Catalogue of Magic, No. 10
-Abbott's Catalogue, No. 16
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 20, 2010 10:28PM)
What condition are they in?

The last Abbott's #16 that went up on Kenna Thompson's auction was in 2005. It sold for $1.00

The last Tannen's #10 that went up on Martinka was part of a three catalog package with an opening bid for the package of $25. It did not sell.

Usually, those two companies produce a LOT of copies of their catalogs.

I'll check with some used book dealers at the San Diego convention.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jun 21, 2010 11:49AM)
Thanks, Bill. They're both in very good shape, maybe better. There's not a mark on the Tannen's Catalogue, and the Abbott's still has the original crisp order sheet within its pages.

Rodney
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 21, 2010 01:14PM)
I'm not sure why those particular catalogs didn't command a higher price.

If you put those up on eBay, you might be able to get somewhere between $5 and $20 for each of them.

It's really a gamble.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Jun 22, 2010 09:38AM)
I'm sorry to say, but one of the people who posted on this thread, MagiClyde, has passed away. I read it in the Magicians Helping Magicians(?) thread. What a real shame.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 23, 2010 11:41PM)
That's too bad.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Jun 25, 2010 03:30PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-03 18:09, gaddy wrote:
As a used/antique book buyer for a large Chicago bookseller for several years, I feel I'm in a position to say that magic books are the some of the most schizophrenically valued books in the world! There is very little rhyme or reason to how/why some books are so highly prized and some are not, except for usefulness and fashionability.

Not that there's anything wrong with it, but it's very curious that fashion plays such a large role in the value of magic books.
[/quote]

Agreed.

This is a very strong and important point to keep in mind when trying to assess the value of your book or collection.

Combine bibliomania and a love of conjuration and 1 plus 1 will always equal 250.

There is no gold standard and no cosmic scale that imparts value to anything, let alone a magic book (much as we may love them).

The bottom line is the same for a Van Gogh as it is for a Dukes of Hazard tin lunchbox – both are worth precisely what a smitten buyer is willing to pay.


Having said all this, I have the 128 page edition of Frank Garcia’s “The Very Best of Cups and Balls.” Unsigned. Copyright 1979. First Edition. Spine in good condition. Front and back covers show shelf wear (some white color chaffing against the light/solid blue).

Bill – any sense of current market value?

With thanks,
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 25, 2010 04:02PM)
I'll have to do some searching for that one.

I checked Martinka, and there hasn't been one up for sale there. I checked the past three years of Kenna Thompson's site with the same results.

I'll check with Andy Greget when I get to San Diego.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Jun 25, 2010 04:49PM)
[quote]
On 2010-06-25 17:02, Bill Palmer wrote:
I'll have to do some searching for that one.

I checked Martinka, and there hasn't been one up for sale there. I checked the past three years of Kenna Thompson's site with the same results.

I'll check with Andy Greget when I get to San Diego.
[/quote]

Hi Bill,

Thanks – I will await word from you.

I also have Frank Garcia’s full-length Three Card Monte book, “Don’t Bet on It” (not the abbreviated booklet printed under the same name).

The specs are the same – Unsigned, spine un-cracked, first edition, scuffed covers from shelfwear but otherwise a tight edition.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jun 26, 2010 12:01AM)
I'll see what that one is bringing as well.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 7, 2010 05:56AM)
Shank Shuffle by Ed Marlo. Blue covers, spiral bound.
I don't own it but I'm curious. Any thoughts, Bill?

Rodney
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 10, 2010 02:25AM)
I'll find out tomorrow.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Jul 26, 2010 06:11PM)
Any updates?
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 27, 2010 10:06PM)
I apologize. I forgot all about these books.

[i]The Shank Shuffle[/i] is still in print. You can get it from Magic, Inc. $24.95

[i]Don't Bet on It[/i] is out of print, but Gambling, Inc. still has a few copies left at $15.00

http://www.gamblingincorporated.com/product.php?productid=16182&cat=256&page=1
Message: Posted by: panlives (Jul 28, 2010 02:28PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-27 23:06, Bill Palmer wrote:
I apologize. I forgot all about these books.

[i]The Shank Shuffle[/i] is still in print. You can get it from Magic, Inc. $24.95

[i]Don't Bet on It[/i] is out of print, but Gambling, Inc. still has a few copies left at $15.00

http://www.gamblingincorporated.com/product.php?productid=16182&cat=256&page=1
[/quote]

Hi Bill,

Thank you.

I was told that the Gambling Inc. edition is the much shorter version of “Don’t Bet On It,” with lean information and sub-standard writing. It is, essentially, a rushed booklet version.

The one I referred to is over 120 pages.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Jul 31, 2010 05:25AM)
That's interesting. I don't have either one of them. Still, it might be obtainable. I'll check with Andy Greget.
Message: Posted by: duanebarry (Sep 5, 2010 10:57PM)
I'm curious about these...

Galloway, The Ramsay Classics: VG book in VG dj
Garcia, Encyclopedia of Sponge Ball Magic: VG/VG
Andruzzi, Grimoire of the Mages, #119/250. Excellent, complete

Thanks!
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Sep 6, 2010 08:10PM)
Which volume of the Ramsay Classics?

The Garcia book goes for about $250 - $450.

The Tom Palmer book goes for whatever the traffic will bear.
Message: Posted by: onimushalord89 (Sep 27, 2010 04:20PM)
I recently received the complete set of Ed Marlo's Riffle Shuffle System. This is a 5 manuscript set that includes. "Riffle Shuffle System," "Patented Riffle Shuffle," and "Riffle Shuffle Finale."

They are 2nd edition and they are signed and numbered by Marlo himself. They are also in mint condition.

I was wondering how much they are worth as a complete set. I have search the net over and over again and I just can't find anything on this rare set.

Hoping you can help

Oni
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Sep 28, 2010 12:27AM)
That's a hard one to pin down. You might be able to find out something from Andy Greget.
Message: Posted by: onimushalord89 (Oct 4, 2010 11:35AM)
[quote]
On 2010-09-28 01:27, Bill Palmer wrote:
That's a hard one to pin down. You might be able to find out something from Andy Greget.
[/quote]

Who is that and how can I get ahold of him?


Thanks
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Oct 4, 2010 12:31PM)
Try google.
Message: Posted by: Julie (Oct 4, 2010 01:44PM)
I don't know if Andy "does" computers...

Julie
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Oct 4, 2010 03:02PM)
His contact information is on Google. I know this is "Magicians Helping Magicians," but there is a point where help becomes spoon feeding. I checked with a google search before I posted that.

The first listing when you google Andy Greget is an article by Jamy Ian Swiss that has Andy's contact information.

The Indus Valley culture doesn't do computers either, but you can find a lot about them on google. ;)
Message: Posted by: Julie (Oct 4, 2010 05:43PM)
[quote]
On 2010-10-04 16:02, Bill Palmer wrote:
His contact information is on Google. I know this is "Magicians Helping Magicians," but there is a point where help becomes spoon feeding. I checked with a google search before I posted that.

The first listing when you google Andy Greget is an article by Jamy Ian Swiss that has Andy's contact information.

The Indus Valley culture doesn't do computers either, but you can find a lot about them on google. ;)
[/quote]

I believe that information for Andy is not current, Bill.

Julie
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Oct 5, 2010 03:49PM)
Maybe so.

He always lists with information wherever he goes, though. His cell phone would be current.
Message: Posted by: Thomas Okey (Nov 9, 2010 11:56AM)
Hello Bill,

I was wondering if you could tell me how much "Whaley's Encyclopedic Dictionary of Magic" would be worth.

It is the hard bound, green binder, one volume addition. First Edition, First Printing January 1989. There is no marks and all the pages are in crisp unbent condition. The binder has no marks or bends on the surface, corners or edges. The book has only been open about four or five times. I call this excellent condition but you be the judge.

As you probable already know, there were only 500 copies printed and only 50 of them were hard bound. But they were numbered in the order of reservation. Even though I have a hard bound addition my book is numbered #256.

Thanks in advance on any thing you can find out.
Tom Okey
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 9, 2010 10:55PM)
That's another tough one. Since there have been further editions, including one that is available as an e-book, and these have included some rather heavy error corrections, it would be very difficult to put a price on them.

I think that at one point, there was some talk of making these almost interactive, that is, if you found an error, you could e-mail it to Bart, and he would correct them on a periodic basis.

Things like this almost take on a life of their own. They require updating.

Maureen Christopher did this with the her late husband's [i]Illustrated History of Magic,[/i] but she didn't correct any of the errors in the original book. She just added on some material to cover the magicians who had become famous since the original book was printed in 1973.

I'll be up East this weekend, and I'll check on it for you.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 11, 2010 05:42PM)
Well, I missed the boat on this one! Before the economic downturn these were bringing $800 - $1000 retail. Figure that the buying price would be about 1/3 to 1/2 that.

Nowadays, with the economy in the toilet, it's anybody's guess
Message: Posted by: Thomas Okey (Nov 12, 2010 06:59AM)
Thanks Bill for the information.

I wasn't planning on selling it at present anyway. Maybe it will go back up by the time I am.

Again, Thanks!

Tom Okey
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 13, 2010 11:27PM)
You are welcome.
Message: Posted by: Cyberqat (Nov 18, 2010 08:48PM)
In general, something is worth what someone else will pay for it.

My parents, writers all their lives, have quite a collection of significant autographed first editions. They told me specifically that when they die, I should call Southebys in NYC as they do rare book auctions and can evaluate the stuff reasonably.
Message: Posted by: Clay Shevlin (Nov 19, 2010 07:30AM)
^^^ For starters, it's Sotheby's. Don't get your hopes up about Sotheby's providing any kind of detailed evaluation of the collection, unless it's [b]extremely[/b] special.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 20, 2010 11:14PM)
I'm sure Clay knows this, but I am almost positive that Cyberqat does not.

Auctions are a crap shoot. Unless you have an appraiser whose knowledge of a book genre is so specialized as to include the likely players as well as their current financial resources, the estimates are not going to be accurate.

All you need is two bidders who really want a book to cause its price to go through the roof. All you need is an unopposed bidder to get the price to come in below estimate. This is true of any auction for any kind of item. Books are really not unique at all.

To further underscore how crazy auctions can be -- a while back, a set of cups came up for auction at the Potter and Potter site. This was a set that had belonged to "Pop" Krieger. The estimate on these cups was $500-$700. I thought that might be a bit low, even though the cups were really in sorry condition. I figured maybe $1000.

The other bidders dropped out around the $1000 mark. I held on until the price got to $4000. I'm not sure who the winning bidder was, but I think he shares a name with a famous Charles Dickens character. ;)

There is also the question of expertise in verifying the authenticity of sale items. Here's an example -- one of the most saleable books in magic is [i]Magic[/i] by Robert Harbin. If you have an authentic copy, you can easily expect to get somewhere around $1200 for it at auction. But how many people do you know who can really authenticate the book? I know enough about the book to spot most fakes, but there are some really good ones.

The late Al Mann had some copies printed in Mexico that were of variable quality, and are fairly easily spotted as fakes. Usually, a look at the cover will tell you all you need to know. However, I saw one a while back that would have fooled a lot of "experts." The paper felt right. The stamping on the cover and spine was clean and clear. Even the special stickers that Harbin had added to the originals by hand were in the right place. I would have paid full bore for it if I hadn't seen it next to an original.

The thief missed one point. The fake was printed on letter sized paper. The original was printed on A4. So, unless the auctioneer had been sharp enough to measure the book, he would have missed that point, as well.

BTW, if you see one that has Kalanag's signature in it, that's a pretty good sign that the signature is a fake.

Clay is also right about the point of providing a detailed evaluation of a collection. Take a look at a Sotheby's catalog sometime.
Message: Posted by: ljgrant (Nov 29, 2010 09:55PM)
[quote]
On 2010-11-18 21:48, Cyberqat wrote:
My parents, writers all their lives, have quite a collection of significant autographed first editions. They told me specifically that when they die, I should call Southebys in NYC as they do rare book auctions and can evaluate the stuff reasonably.
[/quote]

Sotheby's may refer you to another, less-famous auction house. I sent them photos of antique furniture I bought from them decades ago. One was a chair signed by a famous cabinetmaker. They tsk-tsk'ed in their emails that every item must be worth $5,000 or they won't handle it. Of course, they weren't $5,000 pieces when I bought them at Sotheby's! Buy 'em there; sell 'em somewhere else.

Sotheby's may be more accomodating on rare books.

Years ago, I had a brief foray behind enemy lines buying rare books on eBay. Bottom line: don't do it. At the time, sellers with the nicest modern lit firsts sold me uh, deceptive, yeah that's the word, deceptive copies.

Moreover, it seems these rare books track the economy*, but their fine/fine status was incorrect.

*I called several dealers before I knew I had bought a pig in a poke. You could them yawning over the phone. "Yes, that _is_ the rare edition, but there are so many around." Direct quote.

P.S. If your autographed firsts include Dashiell Hammett's The Maltese Falcon in original dustjacket, ignore what I said. Sotheby's may fly you in to discuss its sale.
Message: Posted by: ljgrant (Nov 30, 2010 01:44PM)
[quote]
On 2010-05-01 12:09, Rennie wrote:
[quote]
On 2010-04-26 00:46, ekins wrote:
[quote]
For example, I bought a copy of Cards as Weapons (when they were going for $150-$200) for $15.

-Brian
[/quote]
I feel $15.00 is the actual true value of that book. I think it is the most overpriced book I ever saw. Contains no magic, but a few nude shots..Crazy!!
Rennie
[/quote]

I have this book. To me, it is ordinary except for those explanatory card-throwing photos.

People on Amazon explain how terrific the text is! "Teaches you an incredible skill that can be used to impress your friends." What? To me, there seems to be no trick at all to throwing a card. 1) Pretend it's a Frisbee. 2)Throw.

Perhaps the over-the-top reviews keep the prices high.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 30, 2010 06:54PM)
Ebay is not a bad place to buy books, if you know what you are doing.

There are some sellers who don't know what they have or what they are doing. However, there are a number of them who are honest and straightforward.

Magic is a specialized field. If you don't know the material, you really should be very careful. The main thing is not to buy books or anything else as an investment. If you do, you will be disappointed, because eventually, everything reaches a peak and slides back.

If you want to understand this better, read [i]Memoirs of Extraordinary Delusions and the Madness of Crowds[/i] by Charles McKay. You can download it as a PDF. It will explain to you why "Beanie Babies" and Pogs are basically worthless now.
Message: Posted by: Michael Schwartz (Dec 17, 2010 11:14AM)
If anyone is currently interested in purchasing Harry Lorayne's 'The Himber Wallet Book', I have one available in New condition that I am interested in selling, preferably to a Café member rather than thru eBay. Please PM me if interested.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jul 31, 2011 10:37PM)
Marlos Revolutiinary Card Technique. Limited Collectors edition. # 38 of 100. Signed by editor Elliot Cutler. Mint.
Message: Posted by: Charles (Nov 21, 2011 09:09AM)
I own Soirees Fantastiques, anyone have any idea what its current value is?
Message: Posted by: JeremyM0411 (Nov 27, 2011 12:33PM)
I have a copy of Frank Garcia's The Very Best Of Cups And Balls. I was wondering Value and if it a rare find?
Message: Posted by: panlives (Nov 27, 2011 06:30PM)
[quote]
On 2011-11-27 13:33, JeremyM0411 wrote:
I have a copy of Frank Garcia's The Very Best Of Cups And Balls. I was wondering Value and if it a rare find?
[/quote]


Hi Jeremy,
One of these in fine condition just sold for $225.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (Nov 30, 2011 07:58AM)
[quote]
On 2011-11-21 10:09, Charles wrote:
I own Soirees Fantastiques, anyone have any idea what its current value is?
[/quote]

Check with Richard Hatch on that. Those don't come up very often. A lot of the material was not feasible. For example, the first one of the levitation stools that Fechner had made froze up wit the "rider" in the up position. (According to someone I know who saw an early performance).
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jan 13, 2012 04:59PM)
How about Luke Jermay's "Building Blocks" (not the extended dance remix)?
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 13, 2012 05:26PM)
Improvisations by William P. Meisel autographed to Norm Houghton
Near mint
Message: Posted by: duanebarry (Jan 17, 2012 03:15PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-13 17:59, LobowolfXXX wrote:
How about Luke Jermay's "Building Blocks" (not the extended dance remix)?
[/quote]

About twenty bucks or so, at least until the new one goes out of print. Magicians generally value additional information more than they fetishize first editions.

Versatile Card Magic Revisited, Variations Revisited, The Complete Jarrett, the expanded Walter Jeans Illusioneer and Charvet's Alexander 2nd ed are all more desired than the originals.
Message: Posted by: NaathanPhan (Feb 19, 2012 02:34PM)
I recently found a 1947 hardcover of "Professional Magic for Amateurs" in relatively good condition (the corners are a bit worn) in a collection of books given to me by an old friend. Just wondering if it's a terribly hard find and how much it's worth. I did see that the Vancouver Magic Circle has a few in their library reserve but they didn't have a price listed.

Thanks in advance!
Message: Posted by: Merenkov (Feb 20, 2012 02:33PM)
Does anyone know what 'The Man Who Was Erdnase' (Whaley, Gardner & Busby) goes for nowadays?
Message: Posted by: silverking (Feb 20, 2012 03:11PM)
A regular edition of [b]"The Man Who Was Erdnase"[/b] goes for between $70.00 - $100.00 from a knowledgeable seller.
On ebay you may see folks trying to get upwards of $130.00 for a regular edition......but this price is too high, and few of them sell.

I have a couple, and I paid $80.00 for one in excellent condition, the other (still in shrinkwrap) I paid $95.00 for.

The deluxe edition(s) are all over the map price-wise.....worth whatever somebody can be enticed to pay.
Message: Posted by: Kevin Connolly (Feb 20, 2012 04:02PM)
Here's one you won't see everyday.

http://houdinihimself.com/?p=3945

Enjoy!
Message: Posted by: Merenkov (Feb 20, 2012 09:12PM)
Silverking, thanks for the info on the Erdnase book, that was most helpful.
Message: Posted by: todsky (Mar 4, 2012 07:05PM)
I've got a copy of The Annals of Conjuring by Sidney Clarke, the one published by Magico in 1983. In excellent condition. Anyone have an idea what it might be worth?
Message: Posted by: Jim Sparx (Mar 16, 2012 08:01PM)
[quote]
On 2010-04-25 01:42, Bill Palmer wrote:



In 1972, [i]Greater Magic[/i], any one volume edition, retailed for about $185. It wasn't a rare book. But it was a [i]desirable[/i] book. The Kaufman reprint came out. The value dropped a little, but it's back up again. People still want the original copies.
[/quote]

I paid $125 for my Kaufman edition
There is a copy of GM for sale here @$100

http://www.ronallesimagic.com/magic.php?page=21
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 3, 2012 11:56PM)
It's gone now.

BTW, the info I posted was accurate as of April 2010. The economy has really tanked the value of collectibles.

Example -- 2 years ago, a set of Paul Fox cups (by Danny Dew) in excellent condition would have brought upwards of $500. Now they sell for about half that.

Books and posters are performing about as well.
Message: Posted by: Jim Sparx (May 22, 2012 09:27PM)
5/22 Another Greater Magic at Hocus Pocus Estate sales for $150.00
Message: Posted by: Donal Chayce (May 23, 2012 07:30PM)
Even more amazing--a copy of "Magic of Robert Harbin" just sold at Martinka for $1,001.
Message: Posted by: Bill Palmer (May 24, 2012 12:50AM)
That's a bit lower than it would have gone for about 5 years ago.
Message: Posted by: Donal Chayce (May 24, 2012 04:57PM)
I'll say.

As part of the same Martinka auction, a set "Soirees Fantastiques" went for $811, and an entire set of the Albo books went for $1,895.

Definitely a sign of the times...
Message: Posted by: Jim Sparx (May 27, 2012 01:28PM)
Somebody out there recently spent $7500 for a poster at a Potter auction, so someone has deep pockets.
Message: Posted by: merricksforge (Jul 4, 2012 09:57PM)
I have the David Copperfield's Project Magic Handbook(NOT the plastic comp). I saw it on amazon about six months ago going for almost $300($275.00 I believe). Any info on this?
Message: Posted by: duanebarry (Nov 19, 2012 09:40AM)
How about this one?

The Elusive Canary: The Last Word on Cages
by Mystic Craig, 1936

Apparently a copy just sold for $250 here: http://www.lasvegasvintagemagic.com/Magic-Books.html

That copy was signed by Mystic Craig. Mine is not.
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Jan 4, 2013 09:41PM)
Putting a price on a used magic book is not always an easy task. The method I use relies on past offers and sales. For the last 20 years, I compiled prices from various sources. The data I have were made available on-line to all subscribers of my mailing list.

If this is of interest to you, here is the link: http://www.joyalstack.com/index.php?p=pgov

Martin
Message: Posted by: Mill (Jan 15, 2013 10:46AM)
I own an original set of bound "houdini conjour magazine". What are they worth?
Message: Posted by: gardini (Jan 15, 2013 03:38PM)
Hi,
I was curious if this booklet was rare I have no plans on getting rid of it so value dosen't really matter( or any book for that matter lol) Dai Vernon Select Secrets red cover second printing 1949.

Scott
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Jan 18, 2013 09:59PM)
Scott,

Between $21 and $37.

Martin
http://www.joyalstack.com/
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Jun 5, 2013 10:33AM)
For those interested, I just published a new edition of the JoyalStack Price Guide.

600 books and 250 illustrations were added to the previous edition.

This time, it comes out as a softcover book with 536 pages.

Further information available at http://www.joyalstack.com/index.php?p=pgov
Message: Posted by: Leo H (Jun 9, 2013 10:31PM)
A copy of Soirees Fantastiques went up for sale a week ago on the Genii Forum for $1,099.00. This book was roughly $750.00 when it first came out in the early 1990s. Don't know if it sold.
Message: Posted by: taikuutta (Sep 21, 2013 02:01AM)
I have few older mentalism books:

- The Jinx by Annemann, 3 books, hardcovers
- T.A Waters - Mind Myth & Magick
- The Mental Mysteries and Other Writings of William W. Larsen
- Stunners! -Mental Magic of Larry Becker (with signature)
- Al Bakers Mental Magic - Thirty Effects

These are all in very good to mint condition. Any idea of the values?
Message: Posted by: magicbooks (Oct 25, 2013 04:34AM)
For those that are interested, on http://www.magicbooks.be you can add quotes and references (links of the source) and the site will generate an average price of all the quotes submitted.It also converts the quotes in $ or € according to your profile !
Contributors are welcome !
have a great day !
btw, the site is FREE ! you just need to register http://www.magicbooks.be
Message: Posted by: Leo H (Nov 16, 2013 07:47PM)
[quote]
On 2012-03-04 20:05, todsky wrote:
I've got a copy of The Annals of Conjuring by Sidney Clarke, the one published by Magico in 1983. In excellent condition. Anyone have an idea what it might be worth?
[/quote]

Somewhere in the area of about $100.00. Give or take $20.00.
Message: Posted by: Magic Rik (Dec 5, 2013 04:34PM)
I have a few that I can't find a price for:

1 - Modern Magic - Practical Treatise on the Art of Conjuring, by Professor Hoffmann, fifth edition, London, George Routledge and Sons, 1886 - in old condition
2 - What's on your mind - Dunninger, The World Publishing Company - Forum Books edition - 1944
3 - The Greater Magic Library, Complete set - Volumes I - V, The Greater Magic Library Edition, hard cover

Thanks

I also have a box of what I would call pamphlet / paper backs, for instance, "Keith Clark's Celebrated Cigarettes" - edited by John Braun, Silk King Studios, 1943 - copyright Harold. R. Rice 24 pages.

Rik
Message: Posted by: mblanckaert (Feb 1, 2014 03:46PM)
I have a copy of Dictionary Of Magitain by John McArdle.
I paid $25 for it years ago.
I read somewhere that even though it states that only 50 would be produced, that far fewer were actually made due to the intense labor putting it together.
Message: Posted by: mblanckaert (Feb 1, 2014 03:48PM)
I would like to purchase Thumb Tip Tricks by Donald Holmes.
Does anyone know what it is worth so that when I eventually find it, I'll know approximately what to pay.
Message: Posted by: amu7157 (Aug 9, 2016 05:08PM)
I have a copy of Michael Ammar's "The Complete Cups and Balls Deluxe Collector's Edition," it is in new/mint condition with the custom slipcase and other elements of a deluxe edition in tact; however it is not signed or technically numbered as it should be. Inside, on the first page, there is a small note in pencil on the top of the page that says "1/20 unnumbered copies of Deluxe...OVERPRINTING." It is still a first edition and collector's edition but without some key elements. Does the rarity of this book increase it's value or does it's absence of signature and numbering decrease it's value? What would you say that this book is worth and what would you suggest as a fair selling price reflecting both it's value but also being realistic.

I am new to this forum. I have been trying to join for several months but was always unable because of the "blocked free email" thing. I am the soon to be daughter-in-law of late magician and pilot Randy Malcolm and I have acquired what is left of his magic collection; I have been attempting to sell some of these books/items in order to help pay for his son's and my wedding in Vegas this October. I knew nothing about magic before all of this and will admit I still know very little but I have learned a lot along this journey; both about magic collectibles and about the father-in-law I will never know. I have a lot of books and many coins that I have struggled to place a specific price on because there are SO many little differences in magic books and because the market has changed so greatly. I recently sold a signed first edition of "The Way Magic" by Juan Tamariz for somewhere around $75 had I been in possession of that book 2-3 years earlier the price would have been marginally different and likely around $300-$400 (that's at least what the hard and soft editions of Sonata sold for).

Regardless, sorry for the rant, I will be requesting your wisdom and guidance as much as possible if you all don't mind and if you can suggest an appropriate listing price for the overprint described above, I would sincerely appreciate it. Thank you in advance! :)

Angie
Message: Posted by: camron (Sep 12, 2016 11:37AM)
I have "an evening with charlie miller", it was given to Arthur hastings from Jay Marshall.
Jay Marshall wrote a note saying that it was the 1st copy of the book.
It's signed by Marshall and there are signatures of Robert "bob" parish and Okito...

I also have the 1st edition hardcover of Our magic from 1911, from the library of Alan Shaxon.


I'm curious to know the value these two books

Justin
Message: Posted by: SamuelJonesMagic (Nov 2, 2016 02:30PM)
Camron wow! That is very cool!
The rarest thing I own is houdinis book "rope ties and escapes" from the early 1900s.
Message: Posted by: Matttr (Mar 4, 2017 05:29PM)
I have a London printing first edition copy of New Era Card Tricks (1897). It's not in great condition, but the book plate in the inside front cover states it's ex-libris from David Devant's personal library.
It is filled with notes and pencil marks in the margins.

I would never part with it but would love to know a rough ballpark figure as to how much it might be worth these days.
Message: Posted by: Merenkov (Apr 24, 2017 10:15AM)
Does anyone happen to know what 'The Classic Magic of Larry Jennings' goes for these days? JoyalStack has a range of $30-115, a pretty big range, and I suspect the lower price was before it went OOP and became harder to find.
Message: Posted by: Rjarvis (May 3, 2017 03:35PM)
Good evening all, could someone please help me value my magic books to the best of their ability please? I am moving home and thinking of selling them. I would say all are in great condition. I live in the UK, if that helps value them.

The books are as follows:-

Darwin Ortiz - at the card table
Close up card magic - Harry lorayne
Michael Ammar - the magic of Michael Ammar
David Acer - natural selection
David Roth - Expert coin magic
Simon says - close up magic of Simon Lovell

I did try to add photos but cant upload them here.

Thank you in advance

Rob
Message: Posted by: pierre888 (Dec 29, 2017 08:49PM)
Any idea on value of first editionof fine art of magic by kaplan?
Message: Posted by: Dick Oslund (Dec 30, 2017 09:40AM)
In '80, Tad Ware listed it at $15.50

In '14, one listed on EBay for $100.00

On 5/1/16, someone listed it for $135.00

I have the Fleming edition (first edition, and, as far as I know, only edition) in MINT condition, and, it's available for sale.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Dec 30, 2017 11:04AM)
[quote]On Sep 12, 2016, camron wrote:
I have "an evening with charlie miller", it was given to Arthur hastings from Jay Marshall.
Jay Marshall wrote a note saying that it was the 1st copy of the book.
It's signed by Marshall and there are signatures of Robert "bob" parish and Okito...

I also have the 1st edition hardcover of Our magic from 1911, from the library of Alan Shaxon.


I'm curious to know the value these two books

Justin [/quote]
Wow. Incredible.
Message: Posted by: Montana76 (Feb 6, 2018 01:43AM)
More Inner Secrets of Card Magic - Lewis Ganson and Dai Vernon - First edition

The Ambitious Card Omnibus - Stephen Minch and Daryl - Great condition

Value of these two books and what is the best way to sell them? Need new skis for my kids and was hoping these would pitch in:)