(Close Window)
Topic: You can make Shimmed Shell
Message: Posted by: jimmyj (Jul 15, 2010 01:13PM)
Hello,
Lately I've been having reservations about carrying around my expensive gaffs and performing with them. Truthfully, I'm seriously considering selling most of them and going back to the less expensive items. If presented properly, your audience doesn't even consider the difference, only the performer does.

In any event- I shimmed an Eisenhower Expanded shell at work.
Luckily for me, there's a machine shop where I work. I don't work in the machine shop. I know-It does make all the difference in the world

I went to the shop, picked out the thinnest piece of steel I could find ( it was pretty thin) went to the band saw and cut out two small squares. Made them into circles. Banged them even flatter with a hammer and filed them down even thinner.
Checked out the fit with the Ike shell and super-glued the piece in place.
Works like a charm.
Then I did the same thing with my Ike flipper.
No binding. Nothing.
Now-I can go out-perform my favorite routines, and not worry about dropping my $200,$300 or $400 dollar gaffus on the floor.
Man- The liberation and freedom is incredible.
Thanks for listening.
Jim
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Jul 15, 2010 10:13PM)
Hey Jim,

Sounds like you are a little more "handy" than I am. I'm not sure I could craft my own shims.

What you say about fear of dropping or losing an expensive gaff rings true.

I think about it every time I put them in my pocket and head out to perform with them.

I have two very expensive CSB sets. I am still most comfortable performing with the cheapo set I bought thirty years ago.

I don't see myself selling my expensive gaff sets though. I just enjoy playing with them so much and know they are the best of the best, kind of a "collector" kind of thing.

Cheers!

Sammy
Message: Posted by: jimmyj (Jul 16, 2010 06:52AM)
Sammy,
Thanks for the reply. I hear ya. I have a Cerberus I'm pretty fond of and it's in great shape. If I practise and perform with it much longer, I'm pretty sure it won't be and there goes the resale value, if I was so inclined. Along with a Triple Threat that's soft and old. Really nice.
Everytime I practise or perform with that little puppy, my hand starts to shake. I've already dinged up another TT about 3 years ago and it took me a week to get the ding out.

Thanks for your comments.
Jim
Message: Posted by: Bambu (Jul 16, 2010 08:33AM)
For shimming you can try to use a small piece of a razor blade.
Message: Posted by: Jake Murphree (Sep 1, 2010 08:50PM)
Sometimes when you buy a DVD it has a little security tag stuck inside the case. If you cut one of these open, there are very thin and VERY m*****c strips of metal that work pretty well for shimming light objects - I wonder if this would work for smaller coins or if several strips of this material would be sufficient for a m****t to stick.
Message: Posted by: Mobius303 (Sep 2, 2010 04:58PM)
You do know that you can buy shim material at a very low cost. I got about 8-10 pieces per pack a few years ago at my Local magic shop.
Great to hear how you made yours though.
Message: Posted by: KOTAH (Sep 2, 2010 06:03PM)
You might consideriron filings, available from science supply shops
Message: Posted by: Wes65 (Sep 2, 2010 09:38PM)
[quote]
On 2010-07-16 07:52, jimmyj wrote:
Sammy,
Thanks for the reply. I hear ya. I have a Cerberus I'm pretty fond of and it's in great shape. If I practise and perform with it much longer, I'm pretty sure it won't be and there goes the resale value
[/quote]

I put my Cerberus together with the bottom coin upside down and almost had a heart attack when I couldn't get it apart.

I've considered the same thing (using less expensive gaffs.)
Message: Posted by: Sammy J. (Sep 2, 2010 09:55PM)
You may have caught the thread recently (early August) where I talked about losing my Triple Threat at a wedding, but had it returned much later by someone who had seen me perform magic, and thought it must be mine.

Episodes like these make you leary about pulling the expensive gaffs out for events like this. Admitted, I must blame the flowing wine a little bit.

I wasn't working professionally, I was part of the wedding party.

Bad Sammy!
Message: Posted by: tntjr (Sep 10, 2010 09:51AM)
Anyone ever try this?
http://www.rustoleum.com/CBGProduct.asp?pid=127
Message: Posted by: jimmyj (Sep 10, 2010 10:04AM)
Hello tntjr,
No-But that looks awfully interesting.
Thanks for the tip. Gonna pick some of that stuff up. I'll let you know how it works out. I've got a bunch of shells I can experiment on.
Thanks again.
Jim.
Message: Posted by: BanzaiMagic (Sep 10, 2010 11:36AM)
You can pick up shims pretty cheap (Chuck Leach includes a pack of shims free with many of his PK products), but that magnetic rustoleum has some neat possibilities. How about the underside (or servante side facing you) of a wooden table? Other wooden props? Interesting.

Regards,

Alan
Message: Posted by: RandyHuynh (Oct 9, 2019 02:38AM)
Great
im looking this for long time
my shell from oxf set missing the shim and taflon. I try to make it again
Message: Posted by: videoman (Oct 12, 2019 02:52PM)
This works great as shims:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00065UX42/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Comes in 4 different thicknesses and for magic uses it's probably a lifetime supply as well.

I have used it for various things but for a coin shell, just cut a rough circle to fit inside the shell, don't worry about it being perfect no one sees it and it will work fine. You may need to lightly file or sand the edges to deburr it. Try and keep it as flat as possible during the cutting process and then glue it down using a glue stick. This holds fine but can be removed easily if you want to later. No need to use the repositionable, I prefer the "permanent" glue sticks because with a metal to metal bond it will never be permanent anyway, but will hold perfectly fine for our needs. You can put teflon or even packing tape over this if you like.
Message: Posted by: countrymaven (Oct 18, 2019 12:42AM)
After working with magnets in many applications. You may want to consider this. Magnets stick to the right type of steel. But the steel has to be a certain thickness for it to stick well. If it is too thin, perhaps like a thin layer of magnetic paint, it may not stick very strong to it. So please consider this when you are shimming. It is not just the thickness of the shim but also the surface area of the shim that determines a strong attraction between it and the magnet. Check it out.
Message: Posted by: egoli (Oct 18, 2019 08:16AM)
[quote]On Oct 17, 2019, countrymaven wrote:
After working with magnets in many applications. You may want to consider this. Magnets stick to the right type of steel. But the steel has to be a certain thickness for it to stick well. If it is too thin, perhaps like a thin layer of magnetic paint, it may not stick very strong to it. So please consider this when you are shimming. It is not just the thickness of the shim but also the surface area of the shim that determines a strong attraction between it and the magnet. Check it out. [/quote]

Sent you a PM - please read your messages

Ed
Message: Posted by: Signet (Nov 4, 2019 08:03PM)
I have shimmed my own shells with a super thin wafer and Teflon pad. I use it with a magnetic coin. The shell does not completely cover the side as it did without the shim. This has never been noticed when I've used it. It does make me a little nervous, though.
Message: Posted by: countrymaven (Nov 13, 2019 08:43PM)
Another thing. Once I ordered some shim material. I found out the hard way that certain steels do not stick well to magnets.
I prefer just breaking a razor blade with pliers and sanding the sharp corners down. That steel will stay flat inside the coin because it is more brittle and hard. Some other types of softer shim material are hard to get truly flat. Also, before you glue it on, test it on a magnet. Hold the shim in place with your finger, touch it to the holdout or magnet (including any cloth you will have over it to soften the sounds) and see if the magnetic holdout or whatever has enough holding power.

With the new neodymium magnets, you can always upgrade the magnetic power. I use a holdout with 60 lb. holding power, neo magnets. With cloth and tape over it to dampen the sound. Boy does it work like a charm.
Message: Posted by: egoli (Nov 14, 2019 06:36AM)
[quote]On Nov 13, 2019, countrymaven wrote:
Another thing. Once I ordered some shim material. I found out the hard way that certain steels do not stick well to magnets.
I prefer just breaking a razor blade with pliers and sanding the sharp corners down. That steel will stay flat inside the coin because it is more brittle and hard. Some other types of softer shim material are hard to get truly flat. Also, before you glue it on, test it on a magnet. Hold the shim in place with your finger, touch it to the holdout or magnet (including any cloth you will have over it to soften the sounds) and see if the magnetic holdout or whatever has enough holding power.

With the new neodymium magnets, you can always upgrade the magnetic power. I use a holdout with 60 lb. holding power, neo magnets. With cloth and tape over it to dampen the sound. Boy does it work like a charm. [/quote]

Sent you a PM - please read
Message: Posted by: Mad Jake (Dec 2, 2019 07:18AM)
When searching for thin shim material, as thin as .002, do a search for "Iron Foil". Google or Ebay has an abundance of dealers, primarily in China. You can buy the "Foil" in small or large quantities.
Try not to go over .003 or it may make card shimming a bit hard to do without noticing a slight rise in the card.