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Topic: Playing "Bidness Man"
Message: Posted by: DaveRobison (Mar 12, 2011 02:06AM)
I originally posted this as a reply to another post. But thought it might be a good post in and of itself. It was mainly spawned by a poster in the Tricky Business section, who wants to make $2000 a gig, but was reluctant to take other magicians' advice on how to do it. Their suggestions seemed to go against the grain of his already "planned" plans. I, too, would love nothing but $2000 dollar gigs, but I simply need more growth. Not more plans, but more gigs.

I was reluctant with the original reply here, because I did not want to crush someone's dream or extinguish any enthusiasm. Plus, I'm a comedian; I thrive on "being liked". I truly admire folks' enthusiasm and passion for getting "it" right before performing. Everyone needs to prepare for their first performance. Everyone needs to appear professional when performing, even in the laid back style of stand-up comedian, magician, or ventriloquist. Planning is essential. But I'm reminded of myself many, many years ago and the lesson I learned the hard way; about over-preparing to fail.

Believe me, I know the oft-chanted phrases of "a man without vision will fail" or "In failing to
plan, you are planning to fail". Both of these statements carry truth. But what about over-planning?

I call it the "playing bid-ness-man syndrome". I can't really write an entry without telling a story; this one will be no different.

Back when I had dreams of being a big star, I was 17. I practiced everyday, my technique was flawless,
my jokes were funny and I was ready to get "out there" and start the auditions. There was little doubt that I could succeed, all I had to do was a "little planning" and "I have to look professional".

I went to the bank to open a business checking account, so I could cash all those checks that the
clubs would be showering me with. I found a graphic designer to design a really "cool" logo. I visited the
printers and had stationary and business cards printed. I had brochures and posters made. And because
every popular performer sells T-shirts to adoring fans, I had 50 printed up, just to get started. Now I
was a "bidness man". I had no gigs, no money, but I was in "bidness".

The "bidness" never went anywhere. I told people I was a performing ventriloquist and a stand-up comedian when I met someone new, but all my friends and relatives in town saw me do nothing more. The short-lived celebrity-hood of my childhood days of performing at every breakfast, luncheon and dinner for every organization in town, every library show and every charity function ended...I was waiting for the big time and the big time never came. Once I started waiting for everything to be "just right"...it all went wrong.

Fast forward to "present-day Dave"; I almost made the same mistake when I decided that I had waited long enough to perform again. I got a Facebook page, a MySpace page, a Twitter page, and I started talking to people online, I said I was "getting back into Comedy". I wrote funny stuff as status updates, I commented funny stuff to my "fans" and I started talking about performing. But, I never performed, because I just did not have 55 minutes of "headliner" material written yet. Finally a comedian friend of mine said, "Do you have 3 minutes?" I said, "yeah".

"Good," he said, "You're doing 3 minutes Tuesday night for me" It was a BAD three minutes. (I had 1 good minute.) He said, "You need to write another two minutes. Can you come on stage next week and just introduce everyone and do your NEW 3 minutes?"

I didn't need a set of business cards. I needed to perform; good or bad, and I needed to write more. I didn't need a new dummy, or a new mike stand, I needed to stop playing "bidness man, and get to doing some "show bidness".

After 6 months, I'm still "just getting back into comedy" as my schedule permits--and when I post a YouTube video; there's an audience, not me in my bedroom. And the video includes warts and all. And when I don't have a gig; I say, I don't have any gigs or I'm not ready to have another. I'm not faking gigs, "booked already" or "doing private shows".

So, all you new performers out there; Practice. Plan. Get Perfect.

But don't wait for perfection before you do your first set. Do your first set and then critique it, perfect it, and then do another set.

Again, I am hesitant to post this, but hell, y'all don't where I live, so I'm not skeered.

Dave Robison.

PS Warts and All, but no Ventriloquism. R-Rated and NSFW
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cv-7f6EOfdY
Message: Posted by: Servante (Mar 12, 2011 11:33AM)
I make my living in show business. I started as a ventriloquist. I'm a playwright. That's all I do...except for one class a semester I teach at the university. I can't get 'em to fire me...but I keep trying.

Still do one vent gig a year for the local hospital for the developmentally disabled, just to keep my hand in, and very occasional a vent or magic show somewhere or other. May get back into a little more vent and magic in the next couple of years, because my roots are there. Particularly vent.
But it is as I tell people who ask me about how to break in: two-thirds of the term "show business" are "business."
And part of the business is the material.
I have an ex-brother-in-law who is trying to get into stand up. He plays open mic clubs. He's not funny. He doesn't know it. Too much attention to the dream, not enough attention to the material...and his ducks aren't in a row. Some of them have drowned.

-Philip
Message: Posted by: tacrowl (Mar 12, 2011 12:49PM)
Dave,
Enjoyed your video - some great lines.

Excellent topic - and I 100% agree - you HAVE to do shows to get good. Lots of them. You also have to honestly review and learn from each one, or you'll end up like Philip's ex-brother-in-law. I've stressed this on other threads - video your shows, watch the tape at least 5 times for different aspects of the performance. Pay attention to where the audience laughs. Realize each audience is different - so test the material on a few crowds before dropping it - but cut the dead stuff. Shoot for 4 - 6 laughs per minute, but know that 8 - 10 will propel you above the competition.

I perform roughly 120 street shows every summer. 4 per night, 7 days a week, usually in two week periods. Vent on the street isn't easy. You've got to grab the audience, engage them and keep them. When you can pull in a crowd that is passing through and keep them for 45 minutes - you are doing something right. When people started returning multiple times, I knew I was connecting in a huge way. The first year I did that, the experience allowed me to hone my material and my act. That experience raised my game in higher paying markets. I continue to accept that gig because it is fun, a challenge and allows me to hone new material by putting it in front of different audiences several times every night.

When you start, the free shows, the open mics, the church shows, the charity events, the street - all of those provide you experience. When you learn from the experience and hone your act THAT is what creates the value for the high paying dates. If you don't have the act - the rest of it doesn't really matter.

Tom
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 12:57PM)
Dave;

In my normal business I meet people that go into business for all the wrong reasons and inevitably they fail.

They think they prepare the tastiest meals and everybody will pay top dollar for him to cook it.

They think they can design clothing superior than Armani and open a store, without the need to advertise, just word of mouth will make them rich; they place a sign on the door ďBy appointment onlyĒ and wait for a phone call that never comes.

I can go on and on, but this is not the topic.

So Dave when you went into business:

Did you plan on having fun, or focus on making money?

I learned very early in my career, successful people want to deal with successful people; they donít want to take chances and come off looking bad because they took a chance.

My routine will be successful.

I will look successful.

I will BE successful.
Message: Posted by: DaveRobison (Mar 12, 2011 03:31PM)
I once owned a very successful video production company. My major clients were Kerr-McGee, Marathon Equipment, The State of Mississippi, and Baldor Electric Motors. Our total equipment investment was 17,000. In an industry where typical companies had anywhere from 1/2 to 1 million dollars in equipment.

My clients paid my company based on the final product they placed in their video player and shipped out. And most times we charged more, than our competitors with the fancy equipment. The decision to purchase from the clients came from our talent and our end product, not anything else.

Yes, we acted professional, we delivered on time, and we networked with our clients...we were good business people to deal with, but ultimately our video demo sold the product.

I guess all I'm saying is, if you have the money to purchase everything you suspect you're going to need for an act, then it's fine to purchase those items--but ultimately, they are just accessories to the act. For a ventriloquist, he needs just his dummy and a funny act. For the magician he needs his illusions and a polished patter, and for a comic, he needs a working microphone and a solid funny act. The funny and the polish takes practice and consistent performing. The other stuff, not so important.

I champion all the vents and magicians here, and wish all of you and myself much success. Not my intention to offend, please continue to like me.

Dave
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 03:53PM)
David,

you have not offended me, if the reply was interpreted in that manner I apologize, it was not my intention.

I was not speaking of your video production company; I was commenting on the magic endeavor you were referring to in your post; the planning of the first business; all questions I asked were pertaining to that business.

What was your intentions of starting that business?

Buzz
Message: Posted by: DaveRobison (Mar 12, 2011 04:13PM)
Howie,

Originally, in my youth, the "business" was to be for both fun and money. At that age, I knew I would be a star in a matter of months, I was already a hometown star.

My business plans weren't bad, that was not the reason for failure. It wasn't my performances that were awful, that wasn't the reason for failure. The reason was I got stuck in just planning, just buying stuff, and just talking about performing and my plans. I just quit performing. I quit booking. Because everything had to be perfect. The waiting, and the just talking about it, killed it.

Now, as I'm once again performing again, I almost succumbed to that same procrastination. I bought website domains, got on the social networking sites, thought about logos, dreamed of being a headliner...but I wasn't writing jokes and performing.

Just trying to say, don't wait; perform. The first gig won't be great and you'll have a few more bad gigs even after you have a good one. The perfection comes.

Dave
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 04:26PM)
Itís the reason Iím starting with little children that donít care if my lips move, they just want to see the figure talk. I am not ready to perform this minute; I believe the time will be in the middle of April when I have my first free performance and I should have at least 30 minutes of material memorized.

I am going to go for it then, perfect routine or not.


The concern here from other members is if I start to soon, I will ruin my reputation
Message: Posted by: tacrowl (Mar 12, 2011 05:00PM)
Buzz,
The only way you can ruin your reputation - is if you create one before you start. Do the shows, let your reputation build - then promote the heck out of it!
Tom
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 05:26PM)
Promote the heck out of it!


That I can do

Thanks Tom

I'm on my way.....
Message: Posted by: kidshowvent (Mar 12, 2011 06:49PM)
Buzz..kids DO know if you move your lips and if older ones are there (after they've seen other vents in shows or on tv) they might give you a hard time about it. Plus the adults with the kids will know. You don't help any of us if you go out before you perfect your technique. Funny or not, the hard truth is that technique is important. We don't need any more half-way ventriloquists in the world. I've heard the old "they don't care if my lips move" saga for many years from beginning vents. Believe me..it matters..greatly.

I'm not coming down on you, but promoting yourself as a vent when you don't have your technique down is not good. Move your mouth..you're a puppeteer. To charge ahead when you're not ready hurts your reputation as well.

Mark
markwade@kidshowvent.com
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 08:02PM)
Mark,

I agree with you, reputations are paramount; my first show with all my equipment will be in a church Sunday school class with 3 year old children; they hardly have the ability to complete a sentence.

The parents are friends, the parents know that I am testing out my act, my PA system, the MP3 player and my timing; I will be videoing the show for further evaluation; in this scenario I can practice and correct myself in the middle of the routine and the children would not care, the parents are in service and not even in the room; The teacher in the class would assist me in my practice; it is a practice session, in a church with friends and with parents that will not ďgive me a hard time about itĒ.

Everyone in my church knows what I am doing. Everyone is on my side.

Tom posted his comment here because he reads my threads and posts in most of them; I feel Tom, Philip and Dave (blueshawk1) genuinely cares about me as a ventriloquist.

I converse with Tom, Philip and Dave (blueshawk1) in PM about my progress and plans; information in the PMís are not posted in public, so the complete story is not publicized. I have never really had contact with you in a PM to have a discussion about my growth as a ventriloquist, so youíre not up to date

I donít feel youíre coming down on me, I realize your entering the thread with not knowing the history of my progress; I am doing well, I have mastered most words with 98% competence. I walk around my home carrying Dan and move him in a natural posture with head rolling and body inflections. I practice in front of a mirror. if I wait until I perfect my technique as you suggest. I will never be able to perform; my first few shows can never be perfect; public practice makes perfect, it is why Broadway productions take the show on the road.

Mark; in a nut shell I am almost ready to take my show on the road.

Buzz
Message: Posted by: ljlvent (Mar 12, 2011 08:19PM)
Allow me to share a different perspective. When I started in ventriloquism it was to bring the wonderful art of puppetry into my classroom so I could become a better and more effective teacher. That was my goal and my desire was to be the best I could be for my students. Then something unexpected happened. I started to get asked if I did shows - for churches, for libraries, for birthday parties etc. That was not my intention, but I figured that it was another way for me to share my love of the puppetry arts, and perhaps encourage children to explore their own creative side. I had no sound system, no business cards, no website, no marketing materials - you get the picture. But I did have one thing going for me - I loved being an encouragement to children and I had some characters developed which helped me to do that. My classroom was my practice ground for all the performance bits I was developing, and my teacher's aid was a good sounding board. I also had opportunities to practice more material in my church. Then when I started to get asked to perform for pay - well that was an extra blessing. I was still teaching but added shows in on the weekends and in the summer and in the evenings. All without marketing materials and a website. Strictly word-of-mouth advertising from the happy clients who had hired me.Over the years I found that I did need a sound system, a backdrop and other stuff, but I grew into that as it became necessary. Eventually I chose to retire from teaching and travel "full-time" - well actually my husband said to me, "Lisa you need one job. There are others who can teach your class, but you are the only one providing what you do with your programs in our area. I think you should quit teaching." So, I did quit teaching. Now I have the happy opportunity to perform and teach at the same time!! And I get to bring smiles to children all over! I get to teach them how to make puppets, how to perform with puppets, and I introduce some of them to ventriloquism as well. I feel this gradual growth was a very good way for me to develop and I did not find that my clients were "put off" when I had no sound system at first, or no web-site and all that. Many of them helped me ease into this business side of things because they believed in me and what I was offering. I had developed good will with them first, I did not over-sell myself before I was ready just because I had all the bells and whistles. In fact now I have even chosen to eliminate a few of the "whistles" so I can offer a show that is more refined yet still professional. My reputation was created for me by my clients not by me for my clients! Having the attitude of a life-long learner is always good, it has made me approachable, confident and still professional. I would never claim to be the best, but I have been told that I provide the best programs they have had by many of my clients. And getting the hugs, smiles and notes form the children as well as the heartwarming stories I hear from teachers after my time in their schools is worth much more than $2000 a gig.
Message: Posted by: kidshowvent (Mar 12, 2011 08:48PM)
Buzz..I guess I was not sure how far along you were as a vent. If you have these things mastered to 98%, please go do the show and enjoy yourself. I'm a bit sensative to vents that are not ready getting into the performing arena. As a full time pro I know how they can muddy up the water. Seems like you've got things covered. let us know how you did (or are doing) and I will be glad to pitch in and help you.

I always preach the gospel of "kidshows" (as I know my friends Tom and Lisa do..), so do us kidshow vents proud!

BTW Lisa..good post!

Mark
markwade@kidshowvent.com
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 08:49PM)
Ljlvent

Your story is very encouraging; I admire you for your accomplishments; I on the other hand do not have the built in venue you had.

In your position you were using puppets to teach children, I am learning to be a ventriloquist to basically play with my toys (PA system, backdrop, fancy microphone, etc). As I posted earlier in another thread

I am not planning my Ventriloquist career on making it big and being the best known performer on the west coast.

I want to project a professional image in my routine from day one.

I want music and sound effects to enhance the show

I want tricks to amaze my audience


I am doing this so I can go on stage and play with my stuff, and Iíll have plenty of stuff to play with on stage.

If all I ever do is be in demand to play with my stuff on stage at charity events, hospitals and fundraisers at no charge, I will have achieved my goal, and in my mind I will be a success.


I am glad to see you have a successful program

Buzz
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 08:54PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-12 21:48, kidshowvent wrote:
Buzz..I guess I was not sure how far along you were as a vent. If you have these things mastered to 98%, please go do the show and enjoy yourself. I'm a bit sensative to vents that are not ready getting into the performing arena. As a full time pro I know how they can muddy up the water. Seems like you've got things covered. let us know how you did (or are doing) and I will be glad to pitch in and help you.

I always preach the gospel of "kidshows" (as I know my friends Tom and Lisa do..), so do us kidshow vents proud!

BTW Lisa..good post!

Mark
markwade@kidshowvent.com
[/quote]

Mark;

Iím living this stuff

I will probably go out and break a leg, and not in the good theatrical way LOL

Buzz
Message: Posted by: Dickens & Dave (Mar 12, 2011 09:02PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-12 17:26, Howie Diddot wrote:
Itís the reason Iím starting with little children that donít care if my lips move,
[/quote]
Mark was right what he said about that, they will be the first to shout out, "I see his lips moving". If there are any adults around, they will of course, be more polite and just whisper it to each other.
[quote]
On 2011-03-12 21:19, ljlvent wrote:
And getting the hugs, smiles and notes form the children as well as the heartwarming stories I hear from teachers after my time in their schools is worth much more than $2000 a gig.
[/quote]
I always loved the notes. It's been a long time since I've done any children's shows, but I do recall I had teachers who had the kids do thank you notes, and my wife was a school volunteer, so they gave them to her to bring home to me. I still have every one of them.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 12, 2011 09:19PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-12 22:02, blueshawk1 wrote:
On 2011-03-12 17:26, Howie Diddot wrote:

Itís the reason Iím starting with little children that donít care if my lips move,


Mark was right what he said about that, they will be the first to shout out, "I see his lips moving". If there are any adults around, they will of course, be more polite and just whisper it to each other.
[quote]

You performed in front of unruly children, every child I perform to will be polite and courteous; speak when spoken to and clean up after themselves.
Message: Posted by: Dickens & Dave (Mar 12, 2011 09:34PM)
Hahaaaa, you just hold on to that dream. :)
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 15, 2011 09:59AM)
Lately I have been looking on youtube at magicians, puppeteers and Ventriloquistís performing for childrenís parties in homes, the video shows, kids roaming around, the performer retrieving items taken from his table by the kids; yelling and crying; props falling down; adults walking in front of the performer as he does a trick, it looks like complete chaos

I am wondering if this is a normal for this type of childrenís performance, or has every child performer posted his worst nightmare on youtube to discourage me?
Message: Posted by: Servante (Mar 15, 2011 12:01PM)
In my heyday I didn't perform at that many birthday parties. The venue is too small, as a general thing, to have tables set up with equipment. Somewhere around here I've got a picture of me with a magic/vent show performing in a cramped restaurant setting for the children of some service club. I didn't do many of those. Did that one for a dear friend who had done much for me and wanted a show for the kids.

I liked performing in venues with stages or platforms or, barring these, some distance between me and the audience so I could set up tables and trunks with enough clearance to spot wanderers.
Some of my worst wanderers were adults immediately before or after the shows!
I learned to put magic props away immediately after performing them (open cases facing upstage).
If I was working with puppets, they stayed behind the stage.
If I was working with more than one vent figure, the unattended one(s) went immediately into cases.
I insisted on audience being audience, and participating only when asked. If they got too loud or too peripatetic, I stopped the show until things settled down.
I stopped the show in a friendly manner: "Okay, I'll wait till you guys are done," with a smile.
The smallest children, incidentally, are often the first to say, "I saw that!" on a magic trick, or say, "You're the one talking!" on the vent (though no one ever said, "I saw your lips move!"...and I take pride in that.)
I gotta feel like, except for rare instances, chaos during a performance is the result of a performer not being seasoned enough to know what is going on and dealing with it...or an experienced performer being set up specifically for a YouTube video (after all, who's taking the footage and why would the performer put stuff like this on YouTube?)
Adults are generally much better audiences. They know the ventriloquist is doing the talking, of course, and want to be entertained by the material. Kids can be wonderful audiences, but more challenging, in that they want to show what they know, and are more likely to shout out, "You're the one talking!" (well, duh) or, "It went up your sleeve!" (it hardly every goes up a sleeve). The performer MUST be in control at all times. Children's audiences wear you out faster...but they're also the ones who will encounter you twenty or thirty years later and say, "I saw you do this when I was a child and it caused me to become a performer" or, "It was wonderful and I never forgot it."

That's the stuff that makes you walk on air. It's like Mark Twain said, "I can live on a compliment for two weeks with no other provisions in sight."

-Philip
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 15, 2011 12:14PM)
Philip;

For the life of me, I donít understand why a Ventriloquist would put a video like that on youtube.

I looked at who placed it on youtube; the majority of the videos are uploaded by the performer and they seem proud of the performance.

You have some experience with performing at these parties.

Now that Iím thinking about it, I have never even attended a childís birthday party; not even as a paid photographer.


Buzz
Message: Posted by: Servante (Mar 15, 2011 02:38PM)
The fact that the performers provided their own videos to YouTube is way puzzling, Buzz.
Maybe the allure of being "famous" outweighed the allure of being "competent."

-Philip
Message: Posted by: ljlvent (Mar 15, 2011 02:40PM)
A little bit of preparation will eliminate the possibility of those things happening. I have had to change things during the course of the show to make allowances, and sometimes things just don't happen the way I like them to but I can usually think quickly enough on my feet to handle things. I have had to re-direct small children into the arms of an adult and usually they "get the hint" at that time. My worst experience was when I had a librarian give the children a back-stage pass in to all my magic tricks when I was handing out prizes. That one took me by surprise - I expected that the librarian would understand. I have taken steps to avoid that happening again. One time I had a group of 5th grade boys making all of the puppets name rhyme with male and female body parts (not the ones like heart, lungs, hands etc. you get the idea). I stopped the show and the puppet I was using at that time had some firm words with them. Needless to say, that experience did nothing to change my stereotype of "rich country club kids". The only other "adults" in the room were underpaid teen girls who were supposed to "be in charge". I will never go back there again and I learned a few questions to ask before I decide to take a job! But I have always managed to have a great time at my birthday parties.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 15, 2011 08:40PM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-15 15:38, Servante wrote:
The fact that the performers provided their own videos to YouTube is way puzzling, Buzz.
Maybe the allure of being "famous" outweighed the allure of being "competent."

-Philip
[/quote]

Philip,

I am assuming that the performer is looking at his stellar performance, as he hems and haws trying to regain order and retrieve props; unaware that no child is watching him perform.

I am surprised that while the performer is watching the video before posting it on youtube, he does not realize that he can hardly be heard over the disorder, confusion and bedlam running rampant while the childrenís behavior goes unchecked.
Message: Posted by: wizardpa (Mar 15, 2011 09:48PM)
If you want to pick and chose your shows, working in only the perfect environment with only the perfect aged children you just might only get 3-4 shows a year.
I've been asked to do a show in a single wide trailer. Many of my shows have been performed outside in 90+* heat, with 90% humidity, because parents do not want 25 children running around their house.
I've had my backdrop blow down because of wind gusts of 25-30 mph. There was the time I thought I'd be inside because it was 45*'s but was asked to perform outside and I did not bring a jacket.
You'll be asked to perform for a 9 year old boy who has friends 10 or 11 years old who will think puppets are stupid. You'll have 2 year old children coming up to you while you're right in the middle of a routine. I've had an 80 year old women come up to me while I'm performing asking for me to make her a balloon animal for her great grand-child.
I had a show at a rehab facility. I was expecting people recovering from broken hips or such. It sadden me to see that 85% of the people there were almost brain dead. 3 were in hospital beds with their heads twisted in awkward positions. I've turned down 2 shows for rehab facilities now.
At my last show I had the 4 year old Birthday girl having to go to the bathroom during my show.
You just might be performing at a nursing home with some guy screaming that he does not want to be there.
I think when you do your first show for the 3 year old Sunday School children you will see what I mean.
Message: Posted by: Dickens & Dave (Mar 15, 2011 09:56PM)
[quote]I think when you do your first show for the 3 year old Sunday School children you will see what I mean.[/quote]
That might be the one saving grace, that it is a Sunday school - they might not be quite as free to run around and get rowdy like at a birthday party.
Message: Posted by: wizardpa (Mar 15, 2011 10:09PM)
I have a bunch of shows coming up at the end of the month at an elementary school for grades K-3rd. It will my second year in a row for this school. I can honestly say school shows are very close to being the perfect environment. I guess I've done 20-25 shows for schools and I can not remember 1 bad incident. The teachers do a great job of controlling the children.
Message: Posted by: Dickens & Dave (Mar 15, 2011 10:18PM)
Elementary schools were the only children shows I ever did, so I was spared the terrors of the birthday parties, but I have heard many horror stories over the years.
Speaking of horror stories, it's time to go to work.....
Message: Posted by: wizardpa (Mar 16, 2011 06:17AM)
I've read some of those horror stories on this web site. I have been fortunate and I have avoided bad things happening to me.
All of this being said, I do enjoy performing for children. I hope I make such an impression on some of them that they chose to hire an entertainer one day for their children.

I'm not sure who (Howie/Buzz) will perform for down the road but I'd like for him to understand that things are not always perfect, especially when performing for children.
Message: Posted by: ColinDymond (Mar 16, 2011 08:00AM)
We all work in venues that are not the best, we all have audiences that could have behaved better, we all have hows that could have gone better but some people make these into a show reel and expect to get rebooked.
I hope the ones on web site do me some justice.

Colin
http://www.aceofdiamonds.co.uk
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 16, 2011 08:38AM)
Wizardpro;

Thanks for the heads up on what is in store for me when I perform for my first 3 year old audience.

My post was not to comment on any particular video on youtube, I have never experienced performing with children. I have attended hundreds of performances as a paid photographer, but never in events with small children as the audience.

My post was commenting that it was strange watching the videos and seeing the childrenís behavior.
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 16, 2011 08:53AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-16 09:00, ColinDymond wrote:
We all work in venues that are not the best, we all have audiences that could have behaved better, we all have hows that could have gone better but some people make these into a show reel and expect to get rebooked.
I hope the ones on web site do me some justice.

Colin
http://www.aceofdiamonds.co.uk
[/quote]

Colin:

I am the exception as I have no experience and have never worked venues that was not the best, I never have performed in front of an audiences that has behaved, or could have behaved better; I am new with no understanding as to what to expect.

My post here is a comment on what I observe, initiate replies from experienced performers, and to prepare myself for what I can expect in my routine and how to avoid problems as a performer.

Thanks for your input

Buzz
Message: Posted by: Howie Diddot (Mar 16, 2011 09:31AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-16 07:17, wizardpa wrote:
I've read some of those horror stories on this web site. I have been fortunate and I have avoided bad things happening to me.
All of this being said, I do enjoy performing for children. I hope I make such an impression on some of them that they chose to hire an entertainer one day for their children.

I'm not sure who (Howie/Buzz) will perform for down the road but I'd like for him to understand that things are not always perfect, especially when performing for children.
[/quote]

Wizardpa;

Thanks for the post about my first performance.

I was not at all aware of how childrenís react; I think I would have been shocked if I had just attempted to do my routine without prior knowledge of the kidís actions


My Name is Buzz, I use Howie on the Magic Cafť because I goggled myself one day and all my Cafť posts came up with my posts, including how inexperienced I am; so I changed my user name
Message: Posted by: wizardpa (Mar 16, 2011 05:14PM)
I have only 1 youtube video of myself performing, posted on my website. It is a very successful video of me and Taco, and I'm not even doing ventriloquism with him on this routine. I think I might have 7 other videos of me performing or practicing on youtube. My videos are crude, no real editing skills.

I'm not talking about you Buzz, or really anyone else on this web site, but what I have posted, I share with other people like friends, family and anyone who might be interested. Some of these are just test videos and I tell family or friends to look at them. A great example is one of my Grand-daughter performing for the first time with me.

I've been performing enough now, that what I do has been very successful, and I've gotten great feedback. Feedback, from the people I perform for, that I have not requested, like; "how did you like that." People come up to me after my shows and tell me stuff like; "That was a great show," or like some elderly women recently told me; "she and her husband saw a magician while on a cruise and I was so much better."

Again, I'm not talking about anyone on this site. I'm not even sure anyone has even seen any of my videos. All I'm saying is if anyone, even potential customers do not like something I do, I do not really care. I do not post videos on youtube for that reason.

Just maybe that is what a lot of people are doing with youtube videos.
Message: Posted by: Mr. Pitts (Mar 19, 2011 11:59PM)
Hey Dave, I enjoyed the video, it's good material and you come across as confident. I appreciate the sentiment and the story sounds so familiar. I still have this tendency, but I continually remind myself it's about the act. You gotta have an act and it's gotta be funny or nothing else matters. And if you have a great act, the 'bidness'part is much easier because people actually want you at their events.