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Topic: Bank Night
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Mar 20, 2011 07:23PM)
Does anyone know the history of the "Bank Night" effect? I did a search, but didn't come up with much.
Message: Posted by: motown (Mar 20, 2011 09:11PM)
I believe Tom Sellers created the Bank Night plot in the mid 30's. It was called Just Chance. Not sure what you're looking for.
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Mar 20, 2011 10:27PM)
Thanks, Mowtown, that's a start.

Tom Sellers created the plot, which was what? Where did it go from there? When did it acquire the name "Bank Night"?

The two versions I know of are John Scarne's and Ted Lesley's.

The Scarne version appears in a book I have, "100 of Scarne's Magic Tricks," which is a reprint of the first 100 tricks from the book "Scarnes Magic Tricks" and was published in 1951. Five participants are given envelopes, four of which contain blank pieces of paper and one of which contains a, say, $100 bill. After mixing, everyone is found to hold envelopes with blank pieces of paper. The bill is found in a cigarette the performer has been smoking (politically incorrect today).

The Lesley version appears on his DVDs published by L&L. A participant is allowed to select one envelope from three, one of which contains a drawing. She finds the correct envelope, but misses out on the other two, which contain currency.

Similar basic plot, but the details are completely different.
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Mar 20, 2011 10:28PM)
Oops, sorry--that's Motown.
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Mar 21, 2011 12:04PM)
Maybe this query belongs in another category, but if so, I'm not sure which one.
Message: Posted by: motown (Mar 21, 2011 12:41PM)
Bank Night is the title used in Amercica for Tom Seller's Just Chance. The name used in the UK. Same plot, different name.
There are many diffent presentations and approaches, including Annemann's Seven Keys to Baldpate for the basic plot you listed.

John Archer has a great version on his new dvds.

Richard Osterlind has great version where the spectators end up with lottery tickets and he ends up with the money. This takes the sting out of not getting anything.

Max Maven also has a nice version called Key To The Future on his Videomind DVD vol. 2.
Message: Posted by: motown (Mar 21, 2011 01:23PM)
Here's Another:

Fogel's Technicolour Chance

Five closed and different coloured paper tissue bags sit in a row on a tray. The magician states that four of the bags contain crumpled pieces of paper.
The fifth contains something of value. Spectators are asked to select bags. One by one, the bags are burned with a match, reducing them to ashes.
When only three bags remain, a spectator is asked to choose one and another spectator another. They may change their minds as many times as they wish.
Spectator one, opens his bag to find a crumpled piece of paper. Spectator two also finds a crumpled piece of paper in his bag. The magician opens his bag and finds...
A crumpled piece of paper. He then opens the piece of paper and inside is a $100 bill, or other object of considerable value. A classic theme in magic, given a wonderful twist.
Message: Posted by: motown (Mar 21, 2011 01:27PM)
Burn Witch Burn by Docc Hilford is another really good one.
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Mar 25, 2011 02:30PM)
I've got the history of the effect in my "Banker's Dream" e-Book published in The Wizards' Journal #20 (on my site), which is a compendium of favorite Bank Night variations through the years up to my present-day hand-held version.

So as not to leave you in suspense, the basic plot was and has pretty much always been (with variations): Several envelopes are presented to spectators, who freely choose the envelopes. They are told that only one of the envelopes contains money, and whoever chooses it, wins it. The last envelope belongs to the magician. The spectators open their envelopes one by one and all are empty except the magician’s, which contains the money.

You are correct in that it invented by Tom Sellers, of Scotland, and published under the name “It’s Only Chance” in 1935. It acquired the name "Just Chance" which was popular among British magicians for a long time.

In 1936, American magician Floyd Thayer published his version in the Genii Pacific Coast Magic News, October 1936, Volume 1. He named it "Bank Night" after the then popular intermission entertainment at American movie theaters, which was advertised as "Bank Night."

The rest of the evolution of the effect you will find in my e-Book as mentioned.
Message: Posted by: motown (Mar 27, 2011 07:18PM)
Spellbinder,

What is it about your bank night that makes it better than the rest? Of course I'm not asking for the secret.

Also, how many pages are in your ebook?
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Apr 1, 2011 07:31PM)
Thanks everyone. Your responses have been very helpful.
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Apr 2, 2011 04:15AM)
[quote]
On 2011-03-27 20:18, motown wrote:
Spellbinder,

What is it about your bank night that makes it better than the rest? Of course I'm not asking for the secret.

Also, how many pages are in your ebook?
[/quote]
Variations of an effect occur NOT because they are better than their predecessors, but because they fill a need. Magicians on this forum are always looking for an answer to the question: "what is the best one?" That's a question that has no answer in most cases. Best for whom? Best for what situation?

My e-Book is a history of the effect known as "Bank Night." Each variation described takes the effect to a new level or makes it adapt to a new situation. My own version got rid of all the previous gimmicks; trick trays, magazines and newspapers, and so on. It is strictly "in your hands" and uses ordinary envelopes from the Dollar Store that people are used to buying and using every day. It is designed for close-up use as well as stage use. Does that fill a need for you, too? If so, look into it. If you are happy with the version you have, ignore it.

How many pages are in an e-Book? Facetiously I would say there is only 1 page in any e-Book- you scroll up and down to read it. Judging an effect by the number of printed pages it takes to describe it tells you nothing. However, if you are just asking because you might want to print it out someday: my e-Book currently has 29 pages. I say "currently" because an e-Book, unlike a printed book, can easily be updated and if I discover any things that should be added, I send revised e-Books to all purchasers of the original e-Book. So it can grow, but it can never shrink.
Message: Posted by: motown (Apr 2, 2011 08:05PM)
Spellbinder,

I asked those questions to get additional information I couldn't find on your web site.
Sorry to put you out.
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Apr 3, 2011 08:23AM)
I'm just getting cranky in my old age. On my site, I state: I believe my version, first published in 1986, is the simplest and best. It is performed entirely in the hands, with no need for tricky trays or body work. It uses ordinary Dollar Store security envelopes, and best of all the method works with almost any "Bank Night" routine that has ever been developed. That's why I call it the "Banker's Dream."

However, you are correct; I do not mention how many pages, nor how many words, nor what size font, nor how many illustrations, etc., because I believe those details to be irrelevant.
Message: Posted by: motown (Apr 3, 2011 01:12PM)
Like I said, sorry I asked, bothered and this, that and the other thing.
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Apr 11, 2011 06:14PM)
Spellbinder,

I tried to find your e-book, Banker's Dream, on your website. Where is it?

Thamks.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Apr 15, 2011 08:04AM)
[quote]
On 2011-04-11 19:14, Ray Haining wrote:
Spellbinder,

I tried to find your e-book, Banker's Dream, on your website. Where is it?

Thamks.
[/quote]

Banker's Dream is in Wizard's Journal # 20, it is listed on the home page if you scroll down a little. Or here:
http://www.magicnook.com/WizJournal/WJ-20ALL.htm

If you want only the Banker's Dream information it is sold separately here:
http://www.magicnook.com/WizJ20/wizj20-04BankersDream.htm
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (Apr 26, 2011 08:20PM)
One last question: is the history of the effect included in the stand-alone version?
Message: Posted by: Spellbinder (Apr 30, 2011 10:42PM)
I include histories of most of the effects I write about, including Bank Night. I am avidly interested in magic history and like to share what I know from research, and what I remember from having been there with all who buy my e-Books. If you are not interested in magic history, you can just skip over it, but it's there because some day you may develop an interest in how things got from A to Z, so to speak.
Message: Posted by: Ray Haining (May 15, 2011 02:08AM)
Actually. it's the history part I'm most interested in and was very glad that such a resource existed. Thanks.
Message: Posted by: longdeademperor (Nov 21, 2018 06:26PM)
I would like to perform a variation on the ‘Just Chance’ or ‘Bank Night’ routine using boxes instead of envelopes, pouches (‘Everyone Wins’ by Edwin Hooper) or miniature trash cans (‘Trashchance’ by Supreme Magic). The routine would be for children. The concept is that the magician, having individually and visibly loaded three awful prizes (such as a burst balloon) and one good prize separately into four boxes in front of the children, would ultimately lose the contest. Through magical karma the three boxes containing awful prizes would suddenly be discovered to contain a good prize and the last box, supposedly holding the original good prize, would hold the three awful prizes. Each box would be a different colour. The magician would force the colour of the box supposedly containing the good prize on the first contestant and then claim that box themselves leaving the three boxes with awful prizes for the children. However, the magician obviously gets their comeuppance and the children emerge victorious.

I was wondering if anyone can recommend a way to customize a dollar store or other gift box so as to create the prize transforming effect. I am thinking of maybe using a box which has a lid that is as deep or almost as deep as the box itself (like a Merry Switch Can). The transformation could also work with a shallower lid along the lines of a Dissecting Drawer Box.
Message: Posted by: Wravyn (Nov 22, 2018 06:12PM)
[quote]On Nov 21, 2018, longdeademperor wrote:
I would like to perform a variation on the ‘Just Chance’ or ‘Bank Night’ routine using boxes instead of envelopes, pouches (‘Everyone Wins’ by Edwin Hooper) or miniature trash cans (‘Trashchance’ by Supreme Magic). The routine would be for children. The concept is that the magician, having individually and visibly loaded three awful prizes (such as a burst balloon) and one good prize separately into four boxes in front of the children, would ultimately lose the contest. Through magical karma the three boxes containing awful prizes would suddenly be discovered to contain a good prize and the last box, supposedly holding the original good prize, would hold the three awful prizes. Each box would be a different colour. The magician would force the colour of the box supposedly containing the good prize on the first contestant and then claim that box themselves leaving the three boxes with awful prizes for the children. However, the magician obviously gets their comeuppance and the children emerge victorious.

I was wondering if anyone can recommend a way to customize a dollar store or other gift box so as to create the prize transforming effect. I am thinking of maybe using a box which has a lid that is as deep or almost as deep as the box itself (like a Merry Switch Can). The transformation could also work with a shallower lid along the lines of a Dissecting Drawer Box. [/quote]

How about something that packs flat? Give some thought to using gift bags.
Should be able to make double wall bags without much effort. The items you put in... Broken balloon, a used Popsicle stick, dirty napkin... would all be put into the wall and your good prizes would be in the bag proper.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Nov 23, 2018 09:50AM)
Just Chance also known a Bank Night is published in the book Unconventional Magic written by Lewis Ganson.

This uses envelopes.

It is available in PDF from: https://www.lybrary.com/unconventional-magic-p-53535.html
Message: Posted by: longdeademperor (Nov 23, 2018 03:40PM)
Thanks, Guys. I appreciate the responses. I'll experiment with both those options. I also found a design for a box in Ali Bongo's 'Book of Magic' - the Treasure Casket effect on Page 70. The paper bag used for Pom Poms Galore on Page 72 of the same book might work too.
Message: Posted by: Wravyn (Nov 25, 2018 08:59AM)
[quote]On Nov 23, 2018, longdeademperor wrote:
Thanks, Guys. I appreciate the responses. I'll experiment with both those options. I also found a design for a box in Ali Bongo's 'Book of Magic' - the Treasure Casket effect on Page 70. The paper bag used for Pom Poms Galore on Page 72 of the same book might work too. [/quote]

Let us know how it works out for you.
Message: Posted by: longdeademperor (Nov 29, 2018 02:48AM)
Thanks. I will do. :)
Message: Posted by: Bill Hegbli (Dec 1, 2018 04:12PM)
[quote]On Nov 21, 2018, longdeademperor wrote:
I would like to perform a variation on the ‘Just Chance’ or ‘Bank Night’ routine using boxes instead of envelopes, pouches (‘Everyone Wins’ by Edwin Hooper) or miniature trash cans (‘Trashchance’ by Supreme Magic). The routine would be for children. The concept is that the magician, having individually and visibly loaded three awful prizes (such as a burst balloon) and one good prize separately into four boxes in front of the children, would ultimately lose the contest. Through magical karma the three boxes containing awful prizes would suddenly be discovered to contain a good prize and the last box, supposedly holding the original good prize, would hold the three awful prizes. Each box would be a different colour. The magician would force the colour of the box supposedly containing the good prize on the first contestant and then claim that box themselves leaving the three boxes with awful prizes for the children. However, the magician obviously gets their comeuppance and the children emerge victorious.

I was wondering if anyone can recommend a way to customize a dollar store or other gift box so as to create the prize transforming effect. I am thinking of maybe using a box which has a lid that is as deep or almost as deep as the box itself (like a Merry Switch Can). The transformation could also work with a shallower lid along the lines of a Dissecting Drawer Box. [/quote]


I don't own this suggestion, but members are raving about it, so it may work for your purpose. It is Amazebox by Mark Southland, it changes while opening the box. It is expensive, but maybe it can be made by you after you buy the 1st one.

http://www.penguinmagic.com/s/amazebox

Read more about it here: https://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=599899&forum=218&start=0

This box uses billets in a mental routine, but as you mention, if your objects are not to large, they may work. You just need to do some inquiries to see it will work for your needs.