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Topic: Professor's Nightmare?
Message: Posted by: mrlavaboy (Aug 5, 2003 10:54PM)
I am looking for a good routine. Does anyone have any suggestions?

andy
Message: Posted by: RayBanks (Aug 6, 2003 10:58AM)
Do a search.

There must be 1 million posts about the Professors Nightmare on this forum
Message: Posted by: Turk (Aug 6, 2003 12:10PM)
[quote]
On 2003-08-05 23:54, mrlavaboy wrote:
I am looking for a good routine. Does anyone have any suggestions?

andy
[/quote]

I just got done watching Jon Allen's "Spectators Don't Exist" tape. On it he has a great routine--and a very good and detailed explanation. Not your ordinary Professor's Nightmare routine.
Message: Posted by: TrickyRicky (Aug 22, 2003 09:31PM)
I agree, I went through Jon Allen's rope routine last week and then used it at a strolling gig at a wedding.
The hand switch of the ends was very deceptive, also the ropes return back to its original state in the spectator's hand is quite astonishing.
Try it guys you'll like it.
Richard Lyn
Message: Posted by: irossall (Aug 28, 2003 06:38AM)
The DVD "In The Trenches" by Paul Green has an excellent Cut & Restored rope routine that leads into the Professor's Nightmare, therefore allowing you to "make" the set right in front of your audience. The psychology to your audience is that the rope really is not gaffed.
Iven :patty:
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Aug 28, 2003 01:16PM)
Whit Haydn's Mongolian Pop Knots can't be beat. If he wasn't doing it here in Hollywired I would use it. :carrot:
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Aug 28, 2003 01:20PM)
Thanks, Pete.
Message: Posted by: PaulGreen (Sep 21, 2003 11:45PM)
Thanks, Iven.

Hi Whit! Hehe.

Regards,
Paul
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Sep 23, 2003 04:33PM)
Paul Green does have a great Prof's Nitemare routine. Check it out.
Message: Posted by: Pete Biro (Sep 23, 2003 09:29PM)
Someday I should put my Nemo Rope routine in print... (tease)... :bigdance:
Message: Posted by: DarryltheWizard (Oct 4, 2003 11:30PM)
It's great to get ideas by watching other magician's rope routines; however, once you've digested the tapes and DVDs, it's time to use your own creativity to mould it into your OWN routine. It might be merely the chronological order of the basic moves, it could be the novel patter, a surprise ending, etc.

In my routine I dress in a chef's hat, and mix the spaghetti in a bowl, end up getting fired, and the uneven ropes end up as a bag of chips which is given to your helper.

Darryl the Wizard :goodluck:
Message: Posted by: steveroth (Oct 4, 2003 11:42PM)
The two best I've seen are James Lewis, Hypnotized Rope, and the Professor's Incubus from the [i]Heirophant[/i] (not sure which volume). Both are very clean. Guy Hollingworth's handling that was published in [i]Genii[/i] is also worth a go.

Regards,
Steve Roth
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 5, 2003 03:43PM)
The idea of creating the set of ropes during the performance goes back at least as far as Slydini. He had his method in one of the early books, and I've used it for years.

Incidently, the standard proportions for the Nightmare are, one foot, two feet, and three feet. But, I like to use a more extreme difference. Something like six inches, two feet, and three feet, six inches. It emphasizes the difference nicely, and lends itself to some of the routines where the short rope is concealed by pinching it on the end of another rope. (Sandsational, Daryl's, lots of Tabary stuff, etc.)

Dennis Loomis
http://www.loomismagic.com
Message: Posted by: Count Zapik (Oct 17, 2003 09:38AM)
I'm not sure about Prof's Nightmare. Isn't it a bit used to death and well known?

I'm not trying to offend anyone. I just tend to think it's too charming for words these days.

I remember when I first saw it, and saw through it too in that same moment.

What do others think?

Count Zapik :coffee:
Message: Posted by: magic-markus (Oct 19, 2003 04:48AM)
I love the routine called Three Ropes and a Baby from Richard Sanders. This is a great routine also including the Prof's Nightmare.

Markus
Message: Posted by: Ron Reid (Oct 19, 2003 07:13AM)
Hi Count Zapik:

Yes, Professor's Nightmare is done to death, but it's great magic, just like the rings, cups and balls, and egg bag.

Look at the number of working pros who do it: Whit Haydn, Daryl, Paul Green, Jon Allen, Dan Fleshman, etc.

Ron
Message: Posted by: Count Zapik (Oct 20, 2003 06:27AM)
Hi Ron,

Yes I agree it works as a vehicle for entertainment and lots of folk like it. I'm not knocking it too seriously.

But I do know that when those "old warhorses" that you yourself mentioned come out, I kinda settle down to watch what I expect.

And maybe lots of spectators do too. Most of us recognize these plots too well. Maybe? However, it's just an opinion and I can see I may be wrong.

We all learn to discover what works for us and that's great.

Best wishes Count Zapik :coffee:
Message: Posted by: RayBanks (Oct 22, 2003 10:05AM)
Count

If you only want to perform for other magicians, then I would not use PN as everyone in that group knows it.

But if you, like me, want to entertain people then PN accompanied with the proper patter still works well and will always work well.

I've had people come back with others and ask me to do PN again for the new ones. That's what it is all about.
Message: Posted by: mplegare (Oct 22, 2003 04:38PM)
Another vote for the Mongolian Pop Knot. I tried it out at a Rennaissance Faire and it went over *very* well. And, as Whit recommends in his manuscript, the bigger and more ungainly the knot you tie, the better the effect when it goes flying off into the audience.

It also allows you to say things like, "And when done properly, it's barely noticeable...see?" while holding up a wad of rope by the loose ends.
Message: Posted by: DamienKeen (Oct 27, 2003 01:43PM)
Where can Professor's Nightmare be learnt?
Message: Posted by: Thoughtreader (Oct 29, 2003 03:28PM)
My routine for this rope trick was built from a very bizarre impromptu piece that evolved from one of our old television public shows and believe me, it is too weird to even try to explain or even worry about anyone else trying to do it as it won't work for anyone else BUT I can give you the best tip for the Professor's Nightmare ever.

I start the routine in reverse. I have the three ropes in "equal position" and tied in a half knot around the top portion (which covers the "you know what"). I bring them out and untie them, showing and counting three pieces of rope ALL THE SAME SIZE.

Then I shrink them to three uneven sizes and give them out for examination. After all, once you have changed the ropes sizes is when they want to examine them, not beforehand, SO this is exactly what I do. Then when you get them back and after they have examined them thoroughly, you make them go back to their original—all three the same sizes, tie them back up and toss them away. It is a much cleaner and stronger way to do them.

PSIncerely Yours,
Paul Alberstat
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Oct 31, 2003 09:02PM)
The Professor's Nightmare: Is Still a Secret.

The Professor's Nightmare is without a doubt the most bang for the buck in rope magic. There must be ten great ways to perform it to every poor one. My shows have had the same seven-minute rope routine in them since 1967. I won an award for it in 1980. But guess what part of the routine still gets the best comments? It is still the Professor's Nightmare.

Something that has always made my rope routine different is that I honestly start with an 8' rope and a pair of shears. Nothing is ever added or taken way. All of the cuts are real and complete, all ten of them. There are absolutely no gimmicks used. I just do what the volunteers from the audience tell me to do.

For years it bothered other magicians because I cut my three pieces of rope for the trick on stage from whatever was left from the preceding effects. In May of 2003, I noticed that Paul Diamond is also doing it but from a different approach. Over the years, I have heard all kinds of stories about the correct sizes of the rope pieces. If they were true, neither Paul Diamond's nor my routines would work. The actual secret of the trick must be nearly as safe from magicians as it is from the audience. No wonder it is such good magic!

Bob Sanders
Message: Posted by: dreidy (Dec 13, 2003 05:44AM)
Damien,

Daryl's got an explanation as part of his rope routine on the third DVD in his rope magic series. I use the trick to good effect quite often, sometimes as a stand alone and other times as part of a routine - and although I think most magicians know the trick, none of my audience do, so it goes over a treat. It was the first rope trick I learned and even with my very rudimentary skills I could still impress fairly critical audiences.

David.
Message: Posted by: Daniel Faith (Dec 19, 2003 12:56AM)
I add a special twist to the Prof. Nightmare.
I use 2 setups and do a transposition.
It goes over really strong.
You can PM me if you want to know more.
Message: Posted by: Clifford the Red (Jul 11, 2004 11:31PM)
I like Daryl's handling of the ropes, it is very clean.

After mastering the handling of the effect, there are a million ways to make it unique.
Message: Posted by: RBerteig (Jul 19, 2004 02:18AM)
I use Daryl's handling myself, but my own patter.

Squeeky clean, even for a fumble-fingered absent-minded professor. ;)
Message: Posted by: alekei (Aug 17, 2004 09:15AM)
Does Professor's Nightmare work for Adults? I mean, I have always used this routine for children, but I don't feel confortable doing it for Adults, for example in a TradeShow or in a Cabaret for drinking people. I know that It does fool adults, but I think it is a little infantile effect.

What is your experience about this?

Thanks!

Alejandro.
Message: Posted by: fanwun (Aug 17, 2004 09:40AM)
Alekei,

Yes it works for adults. I just recently added it to my children's shows. You would definitely have to adapt your patter to the situation. For drinking people, you could tie to being drunk, or not use any patter. The effect is visual. For trade shows, you tie the patter to "making ends meet" or something. In any event, it does work for adults.
Message: Posted by: DrBob (Aug 17, 2004 06:37PM)
When cutting the ropes on stage, how do you get the lengths right.... or isn't that a problem? (never tried cutting my own)
Message: Posted by: Basil (Aug 20, 2004 07:38AM)
Is anybody here familiar with Insomnia by Timothy Wenk? The ad write-up sounded great, but then don't they always?
Message: Posted by: Dario (Sep 18, 2004 01:55AM)
Mamma Mia rope routine from Colombini is very practical and complete multiphase routine.

Darío
Message: Posted by: Werner G. Seitz (Sep 18, 2004 12:22PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-20 08:38, Basil wrote:
Is anyboy here familiar with Insomnia by Timothy Wenk? The ad write-up sounded great, but then don't they always?
[/quote]Yes..forget it..it's magic for magicians !
(It's not bad..it is just not needed to entertain normal public!)
Message: Posted by: Kjellstrom (Sep 28, 2004 09:24AM)
HOW ABOUT: Jari Santala's Magician's Nightmare?
Looks very good, any hard setup?
Watch a online video here: http://www.hanklee.org/hankievision/index.html
Message: Posted by: RonCalhoun (Oct 8, 2004 11:10PM)
[quote]
On 2003-10-27 14:43, DamienKeen wrote:
Where can Professor's Nightmare be learnt?
[/quote]

Drop by ANY magic store and ask for "My Favorite Rope Trick"
Message: Posted by: Eric Woods (Oct 9, 2004 11:49PM)
John Tremaine has a good one on one of his videos in the three volume set, he does a good job of explaining it.
Message: Posted by: Scott Ocheltree (Oct 12, 2004 11:04PM)
I have been playing around with the handling of the Professor's Nightmare for some time now. I've known the basics of the trick since I was a kid, and for that reason I never was really drawn to it. Most effects I like are ones that baffled me the first time I saw them. I never saw anyone perform this before I purchased it in a mass-marketed line of tricks Milton-Bradley put out in the 70's.

Still I know there is power in this effect, so I've continued to play with it.

A couple weeks ago I went to a lecture by Jim Pace (The Web) and saw his version he calls "Pro Nightmare". It's a very beautiful little routine that turns around the traditional process and adds a few more moves to it. I really like this and am working on it now. Jim has it on his DVD called: "Gags 2".
Message: Posted by: Clarioneer (Oct 19, 2004 11:50AM)
Just got Sanders Fiber Optics (two ropes and a baby on steroids) which starts out with PN. Then dug around here and found Pete's method for creating the lengths in the first place... This is a magical intro into Sanders routine which only really uses 2 of the ropes anyway... so you can finish with 3 diff lengths - what a kicker! thanks for sharing Pete....
Message: Posted by: Bob Sanders (Aug 12, 2005 09:15AM)
[quote]
On 2004-10-19 12:50, Clarioneer wrote:
Just got Sanders Fiber Optics (two ropes and a baby on steroids), which starts out with PN. Then dug around here and found Pete's method for creating the lengths in the first place... This is a magical intro into Sanders routine, which only really uses 2 of the ropes anyway... so you can finish with 3 diff lengths - what a kicker! Thanks for sharing Pete...
[/quote]

For clarity sake, there are two R Sanders that people get confused. Fortunately for me one is Richard Sanders for whom I have a great deal of respect. The other is myself Robert L. (Bob) Sanders who first learned the "ropes" as a young cowboy. Oddly, one of my heroes was Will Rogers who was probably better at making a living (or killing) with a piece of rope than anyone since. (However, I think Richard and I have muddled through in style. The kids have trust funds.) Most people are unaware that when Will Rogers was killed in the plane crash, he had a magic trick with him he was learning.

If I ever get the time and Tabman together at the same time, I plan to put out a CD with my stage rope routine. (I tell people that I was just waiting until I was old enough to do that! Now I'm beginning to believe that if I don't, rope will get too expensive to use! When I started in 1961, cotton clothesline was cheaper than plow line. Life changes. Neither is common now.)

Enjoy your rope magic. Audiences certainly do.

Bob Sanders
Magic By Sander
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Aug 12, 2005 12:52PM)
[quote]
On 2004-08-17 10:15, alekei wrote:
Does Professor's Nightmare work for Adults? I mean, I have always used this routine for children, but I don't feel confortable doing it for Adults, for example in a TradeShow or in a Cabaret for drinking people. I know that It does fool adults, but I think it is a little infantile effect.

What is your experience about this?

Thanks!

Alejandro.
[/quote]

There is video of my Professor's Nightmare routine called the "Mongolian Pop Knot" being performed for adults at the Magic Castle in Hollywood:

http://www.whithaydn.com/video_clips

I have used this routine for thirty years for both children and adults, and it always gets a good response. I don't think that PN is overdone. Magicians just see too many magicians. Lay people rarely ever see a magician.

The kids that pick up on the PN are easily fooled with a count, the cut into the PN, and the restoration. It really drives them more nuts than if they didn't have a clue.
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Aug 12, 2005 01:54PM)
Dear Whit,

Thanks for those videos. Your performances are absolutely wonderful.

Is the character you play in those routines a new one for you, or has that been your performing persona for a long time? How did you arrive at that character? It looks like it would do really well on those riverboat casinos.

0pus
Message: Posted by: Whit Haydn (Aug 12, 2005 02:39PM)
It is a new character. First time out that week (July 4) at the Magic Castle.
Message: Posted by: 0pus (Aug 12, 2005 02:50PM)
I like it.

0pus