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Topic: The "deepest" movie ever made
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 23, 2011 04:19PM)
The Deep? The Abyss?

No no. The "deepest" movie ever made is Blade Runner. I honestly believe I could get three or four philosophy lectures from that movie. Maybe a whole course.

Anything else come to mind?
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 23, 2011 04:22PM)
Those two movies where folks took fancy drill vehicles down to the core of the earth, one with nukes?

Or perhaps the Hitchhiker's Guide where they take a tour of the planet under construction?
Message: Posted by: bblumen (Oct 23, 2011 04:27PM)
Given one of your interests, The Crow?

Also, since this is a magic site, The Illusionist.


Brian
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 23, 2011 04:36PM)
Enjoyed Blade Runner quite a bit. It has a very different "feel" than the PKD novel. I think "Les Enfants du Paradis" is also very rich, quite a bit in there for people who are interested in performing arts in particular.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 23, 2011 04:37PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 17:19, stoneunhinged wrote:
The Deep? The Abyss?

No no. The "deepest" movie ever made is Blade Runner. I honestly believe I could get three or four philosophy lectures from that movie. Maybe a whole course.

Anything else come to mind?
[/quote]

The Island. Strongly recommended to you, if you haven't watched it. It takes less time to watch than it takes to read Bloom's Shakespeare book. ;)
Message: Posted by: gdw (Oct 23, 2011 04:42PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 17:27, bblumen wrote:
Given one of your interests, The Crow?

Also, since this is a magic site, The Illusionist.


Brian
[/quote]

The Illusionist, really?
Message: Posted by: Tom Cutts (Oct 23, 2011 04:49PM)
Videodrome.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 23, 2011 04:57PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 17:49, Tom Cutts wrote:
Videodrome.
[/quote]

"My father has not engaged in conversation for at least twenty years. The monologue is his preferred mode of discourse."

I love Cronenberg.

Dead Ringers is up there too:"I've often thought that there should be beauty contests for the insides of bodies."

John
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 23, 2011 05:12PM)
How about "The Player" as conversation starter? Even the first shot should be good for a few lectures.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 23, 2011 05:27PM)
As far as movies overtly about stage magic go, I thought The Prestige was deeper than The Illusionist, but The Illusionist does have a "happy" ending and Jessica Biel.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 23, 2011 05:42PM)
Slingblade.
Message: Posted by: rockwall (Oct 23, 2011 06:00PM)
Being John Malkovich

And I gotta tell ya Stoney. I'd LOVE to sit in on a philosophy lecture of yours using Blade Runner as the basis.

Mike
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 23, 2011 06:42PM)
Is this testing whether we're nerds or just whether we can imagine StoneUnhinged dressed in that outfit?
Message: Posted by: Pop Haydn (Oct 23, 2011 08:56PM)
I would go with Unforgiven. The deep version of Huck Finn has not been made, but that would be great, especially on the question of the teleological suspension of the ethical--when Huck decides to go to hell rather than do the "right thing" and turn Jim in.
Message: Posted by: motown (Oct 23, 2011 09:47PM)
John Ford's The Searchers. When it came out the critics just didn't understand the complex issues going on in that film. Now they do.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 23, 2011 09:50PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 21:56, Pop Haydn wrote:
I would go with Unforgiven. The deep version of Huck Finn has not been made, but that would be great, especially on the question of the teleological suspension of the ethical--when Huck decides to go to hell rather than do the "right thing" and turn Jim in.
[/quote]

[b]SLING BLADE SPOILER BELOW[/b]

Two good calls, and I think the Huck Finn comment echoes the suggestion for Sling Blade, when Carl decides to return to his own hell by doing the "wrong" thing and saving the Wheatleys (by killing Doyle). It also challenges our sense of binaries and "knowledge" (particularly moral knowledge) when we spend the first 95% of the movie pondering the false dichotomy - is Carl cured, and therefore will not kill again; or is he insane, and therefore will kill again? The realization that he could be perfectly sane, and choose to commit murder, fully aware of the implications, including his loss of freedom as a sacrifice for his friend, is the ultimate sucker punch.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 23, 2011 09:51PM)
Like Whit's Huck Finn, I don't think it's been made yet, but Frankenstein would be another.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 23, 2011 11:11PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 22:51, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Like Whit's Huck Finn, I don't think it's been made yet, but Frankenstein would be another.
[/quote]

Bride of Frankenstein is my all time favorite movie.
And I do think it was pretty deep, but with a sense of humor that kept it from being overbearing.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 23, 2011 11:48PM)
Joseph Losey's and Harold Pinter's The Servant with Dirk Bogarde.

At least I thought so when I was a kid.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 03:42AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 21:56, Pop Haydn wrote:
I would go with Unforgiven.
[/quote]

True, that. I got obsessed with that movie once. Watched it about 20 times in two weeks.
Message: Posted by: Ray Tupper. (Oct 24, 2011 07:41AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-23 22:51, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Like Whit's Huck Finn.
[/quote]
Is that a spoonerism Lobo?
Ray.
Message: Posted by: kcg5 (Oct 24, 2011 10:49AM)
BRAZIL!!!!!!!!!


without the happy ending crap
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 10:52AM)
I know I'll be accused of pretentiousness, but how about two Euro classics:

Wild Strawberries (IMO one of the best movies ever)

Au Hasard Balthazar (One of the most perplexing movies I've ever seen. But if "What is a good life" is the deepest question, then this has to qualify as a deep movie.)

John
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 24, 2011 11:04AM)
Apocalypse Now.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Oct 24, 2011 11:06AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 11:49, kcg5 wrote:
BRAZIL!!!!!!!!!


without the happy ending crap
[/quote]

Great surreal movie, but I wouldn't consider a lobotomy a happy ending.


My vote is Naked Lunch.
Message: Posted by: kcg5 (Oct 24, 2011 11:23AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:06, Salguod Nairb wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 11:49, kcg5 wrote:
BRAZIL!!!!!!!!!


without the happy ending crap
[/quote]


There are two endings to the film. One Gillham hated, one he didn't.
Great surreal movie, but I wouldn't consider a lobotomy a happy ending.


My vote is Naked Lunch.
[/quote]
Message: Posted by: Slide (Oct 24, 2011 11:38AM)
My Dinner with Andre
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 11:42AM)
Rocky
First Blood (book ending was more intense and did not leave room for sequels.)
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 11:43AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:04, landmark wrote:
Apocalypse Now.
[/quote]

But still a pale shadow of Conrad's novel.

John
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 11:44AM)
Dawn of the Dead (original)
The Loved One
Once Upon a Time in the West
Oh, Brother Where art Thou
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Oct 24, 2011 11:49AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:38, BillMcCloskey wrote:
My Dinner with Andre
[/quote]. My favorite film.

I also enjoyed I Heart Huckabees.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 11:53AM)
When I took high school philosophy the Star Wars movies were a big part of it (this was shortly before the prequels) because the required reading was mostly Joseph Campbell.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 24, 2011 12:01PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:43, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:04, landmark wrote:
Apocalypse Now.
[/quote]

But still a pale shadow of Conrad's novel.

John
[/quote]

I've always been astounded that Heart of Darkness was written in Conrad's THIRD (!!!!!!) language.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 12:47PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 13:01, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:43, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:04, landmark wrote:
Apocalypse Now.
[/quote]

But still a pale shadow of Conrad's novel.

John
[/quote]

I've always been astounded that Heart of Darkness was written in Conrad's THIRD (!!!!!!) language.
[/quote]

Me too. The man had a great gift.

And I agree that Heart of Darkness remains chilling and extraordinary.

But Apocalypse Now isn't just a "pale shadow"; rather, an interesting interpretation very much worth seeing. Just don't buy the director's cut. I despise the director's cut.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 24, 2011 12:58PM)
I think that AN is missing the "coda" at the end of THOD, a scene which I find particularly chilling:

[quote] "'I have been very happy -- very fortunate -- very proud,' she went on. 'Too fortunate. Too happy for a little while. And now I am unhappy for -- for life.'

"She stood up; her fair hair seemed to catch all the remaining light in a glimmer of gold. I rose, too.

"'And of all this,' she went on mournfully, 'of all his promise, and of all his greatness, of his generous mind, of his noble heart, nothing remains -- nothing but a memory. You and I -- '

"'We shall always remember him,' I said hastily.

"'No!' she cried. 'It is impossible that all this should be lost -- that such a life should be sacrificed to leave nothing -- but sorrow. You know what vast plans he had. I knew of them, too -- I could not perhaps understand -- but others knew of them. Something must remain. His words, at least, have not died.'

"'His words will remain,' I said.

"'And his example,' she whispered to herself. 'Men looked up to him -- his goodness shone in every act. His example -- '

"'True,' I said; 'his example, too. Yes, his example. I forgot that.'

"But I do not. I cannot -- I cannot believe -- not yet. I cannot believe that I shall never see him again, that no-body will see him again, never, never, never.'

"She put out her arms as if after a retreating figure, stretching them back and with clasped pale hands across the fading and narrow sheen of the window. Never see him! I saw him clearly enough then. I shall see this eloquent phantom as long as I live, and I shall see her, too, a tragic and familiar Shade, resembling in this gesture another one, tragic also, and bedecked with powerless charms, stretching bare brown arms over the glitter of the infernal stream, the stream of darkness. She said suddenly very low, 'He died as he lived.'

"'His end,' said I, with dull anger stirring in me, 'was in every way worthy of his life.'

"'And I was not with him,' she murmured. My anger subsided before a feeling of infinite pity.

"'Everything that could be done -- ' I mumbled.

"'Ah, but I believed in him more than any one on earth -- more than his own mother, more than -- himself. He needed me! Me! I would have treasured every sigh, every word, every sign, every glance.'

"I felt like a chill grip on my chest. 'Don't,' I said, in a muffled voice.

"'Forgive me. I -- I have mourned so long in silence -- in silence. . . . You were with him -- to the last? I think of his loneliness. Nobody near to understand him as I would have understood. Perhaps no one to hear. . . .'

"'To the very end,' I said, shakily. 'I heard his very last words. . . .' I stopped in a fright.

"'Repeat them,' she murmured in a heart-broken tone. 'I want -- I want -- something -- something -- to -- to live with.'

"I was on the point of crying at her, 'Don't you hear them?' The dusk was repeating them in a persistent whisper all around us, in a whisper that seemed to swell menacingly like the first whisper of a rising wind. 'The horror! The horror!'

"'His last word -- to live with,' she insisted. 'Don't you understand I loved him -- I loved him -- I loved him!'

"I pulled myself together and spoke slowly.

"'The last word he pronounced was -- your name.'

"I heard a light sigh and then my heart stood still, stopped dead short by an exulting and terrible cry, by the cry of inconceivable triumph and of unspeakable pain. 'I knew it -- I was sure!' . . . She knew. She was sure. I heard her weeping; she had hidden her face in her hands. It seemed to me that the house would collapse before I could escape, that the heavens would fall upon my head. But nothing happened. The heavens do not fall for such a trifle. Would they have fallen, I wonder, if I had rendered Kurtz that justice which was his due? Hadn't he said he wanted only justice? But I couldn't. I could not tell her. It would have been too dark -- too dark altogether. . . ."

Marlow ceased, and sat apart, indistinct and silent, in the pose of a meditating Buddha. Nobody moved for a time. "We have lost the first of the ebb," said the Director suddenly. I raised my head. The offing was barred by a black bank of clouds, and the tranquil waterway leading to the uttermost ends of the earth flowed sombre under an overcast sky -- seemed to lead into the heart of an immense darkness. [/quote]

Wonderful . . .
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 01:07PM)
Indeed, brilliant.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 01:15PM)
Great excerpt, and yes, it is everything at the end of the book. If you ask me name my favourite novel, about 60% of the time, I'll say Heart of Darkness.

John
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 01:20PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:15, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
If you ask me name my favourite novel, about 60% of the time, I'll say Heart of Darkness.

John
[/quote]

I'd probably say The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.
Or the novelization of the film "Hard Target."
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 24, 2011 01:21PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:15, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
Great excerpt, and yes, it is everything at the end of the book. If you ask me name my favourite novel, about 60% of the time, I'll say Heart of Darkness.

John
[/quote]

What about the other 40%?

My favorite movie varies from time to time, but my favorite novel is very reliably John Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany."
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 01:22PM)
*** it, "novelisation."

[img]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_xqU8aCV8ADc/TPWna_GomvI/AAAAAAAAAaU/yeT6ZCxZxKE/s1600/1291160300612.jpg[/img]

"Don't Hunt What you Can't Kill." Put that in your philosophy class. **** Yeah.
Message: Posted by: isaacfawlkes (Oct 24, 2011 01:26PM)
The Blues Brother. A social satire delving into the Judeo-Christian interrelationship of the prision system and the Catholic Church. Also had a really cool car chase and Johnathon Pendragon as a stunt double.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 01:57PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:15, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
Great excerpt, and yes, it is everything at the end of the book. If you ask me name my favourite novel, about 60% of the time, I'll say Heart of Darkness.

John
[/quote]

What about the other 40%?

My favorite movie varies from time to time, but my favorite novel is very reliably John Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany."
[/quote]

I was hoping you'd ask. Lolita.

And I haven't read Owen Meany. I'll get on that right away.

John
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 01:59PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
...but my favorite novel is very reliably John Irving's "A Prayer for Owen Meany."
[/quote]

Interesting choice. It is (IMHO), by far Irving's most interesting book, and a whopping good read. My second Irving choice would be "The Water-Method Man".

My favorite novel is Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". But no one ought to read anything into that choice. I simply loved the book.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 02:00PM)
So it's just me for Hard Target?
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 02:04PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:59, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:21, LobowolfXXX wrote:
My favorite novel is Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum". But no one ought to read anything into that choice. I simply loved the book.
[/quote]

Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John
Message: Posted by: James FX (Oct 24, 2011 02:12PM)
Invasion of the Body Snatchers. Unexpectedly deep for me, at least to my young mind back then.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 24, 2011 02:58PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:00, critter wrote:
So it's just me for Hard Target?
[/quote]

I've only seen the Broadway musical.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 24, 2011 02:59PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 14:57, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:


And I haven't read Owen Meany. I'll get on that right away.

John
[/quote]

Please do...I'd be very interested to hear your take.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 03:16PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:04, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John
[/quote]

As long as were on the book thing, my favorite "book"--by FAR--is "A River Runs Through It." All three stories are wonderful, the writing is delicious, the trip to a rough, manly America with lumberjacks and stuff like that that is no more--you know, back when it was like Canada...what more can one want for an evening's fireside read? And there's even a card sharp in the third story! Not sure if I would call it deep, but I would call it profound and deeply touching. And the truth is, I have been brought to tears by the title story many, many times.

I saw the movie of the title story once. *yawn*, for the most part. The story with the card sharp was made into some kind of TV movie with Ricky Jay playing the cook, but I've only seen video clips of Ricky shuffling, so I have no idea how the movie itself played out.

Since I also love "Young Men and Fire", I can say without hesitation of any kind that my favorite writer of all time is Norman Maclean.
Message: Posted by: ClintonMagus (Oct 24, 2011 03:16PM)
Mr. Bean...
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 24, 2011 03:17PM)
...is deep!

Or not?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZujYUcY5xc&feature=s2l
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 24, 2011 03:31PM)
I would be hard pressed to name a favorite novel, although I have probably read TLoTR more times than most other books on my shelf. 100 Years of Solitude is also a wonderful book to read and read again. At the moment, though, having just last week completed my first reading of Chandler's translation of Vasily Grossman's "LIFE AND FATE," I'd have to put it very high on my list. Definitely worthy of the company of Pasternak and Shalamov.
Message: Posted by: motown (Oct 24, 2011 03:36PM)
"The Reader"
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 03:57PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 16:31, Woland wrote:
I would be hard pressed to name a favorite novel, although I have probably read TLoTR more times than most other books on my shelf. 100 Years of Solitude is also a wonderful book to read and read again. At the moment, though, having just last week completed my first reading of Chandler's translation of Vasily Grossman's "LIFE AND FATE," I'd have to put it very high on my list. Definitely worthy of the company of Pasternak and Shalamov.
[/quote]

You're right, Woland. We DO have a lot in common.

John
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 24, 2011 04:10PM)
Thank you, Magnus. We should have more discussions of eternal matters here, rather than ephemeral.
Message: Posted by: panlives (Oct 24, 2011 04:47PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 16:16, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:04, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:

Too late. It's a great book, and, yeah, I think can see some of your attraction to it.

John
[/quote]

As long as were on the book thing, my favorite "book"--by FAR--is "A River Runs Through It." All three stories are wonderful, the writing is delicious, the trip to a rough, manly America with lumberjacks and stuff like that that is no more--you know, back when it was like Canada...what more can one want for an evening's fireside read? And there's even a card sharp in the third story! Not sure if I would call it deep, but I would call it profound and deeply touching. And the truth is, I have been brought to tears by the title story many, many times.

I saw the movie of the title story once. *yawn*, for the most part. The story with the card sharp was made into some kind of TV movie with Ricky Jay playing the cook, but I've only seen video clips of Ricky shuffling, so I have no idea how the movie itself played out.

Since I also love "Young Men and Fire", I can say without hesitation of any kind that my favorite writer of all time is Norman Maclean.
[/quote]

"I am haunted by waters."
Message: Posted by: Steve_Mollett (Oct 24, 2011 07:19PM)
Altered States
7 Faces of Dr. Lao
2001, a Space Odyssey
M
The Day the Earth Stood Still (original)
Vampyr
Things to Come
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 24, 2011 07:38PM)
Perhaps we should distinguish between the deepest movie (or book), my favorite movie, and the greatest movie (or book).
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 24, 2011 09:56PM)
All of the movie choices, including my own, have been very mainstream. There's a whole world of avant-garde film that we haven't touched (and that I am largely unfamilar with, despite my membership to MOMA :) ).

Greatest book: Don Quixote. Favorite novelist: Philip Roth. Greatest Literary achievement of any kind: Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies, better known as the First Folio.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 24, 2011 10:29PM)
Would you call Au Hasard Balthazar mainstream, Landmark?
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 24, 2011 10:30PM)
No, fair enough.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 10:38PM)
I'm also pretty sure The Loved One is pretty far from mainstream ;)
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 24, 2011 10:51PM)
Oh yeah, on novels I also really like Fight Club and Choke, both by Chuck Pahla... *** it. Both by the same guy.
Fight Club I think was adapted well, the movie version of Choke was awful.
With books I'm more of a non-fiction kind of guy.
Message: Posted by: Slide (Oct 24, 2011 11:39PM)
If I had to pick the book that had the most impact on my life, that would be easy: Henry Miller: The Rosy Crucifiction.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 24, 2011 11:52PM)
Interesting addendum to this thread...I had a tutoring appointment today with a guy who was a philosophy major. The appointment was at his place, and I was perusing his bookcase, waiting for him to get some things. Numerous philosophy titles...Hegel, Heidegger, Nietzsche, Kant, etc. I'm sure there were other novels there, but the first one I saw among them was...Heart of Darkness.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 25, 2011 05:32AM)
Your student has better taste in literature, it seems, Lobowolf, than in philosophy . . . LOL. On the subject of the greatest single book ever written, landmark, I am inclined to agree with you. You've re-inspired me to learn Spanish by reading it line by line with one of the recent translations . . .

The year I spent reading [i]A la recherche du temps perdu[/i] to the exclusion of any other literature was not wasted, either. [i]L'education sentimentale[/i] is also a very wise, very well crafted novel, not entirely irrelevant even today . . . the generation of 1848 and the generation of 1968 may have something in common.

The Tin Drum, Cat and Mouse, and Local Anesthetic are also quite good, especially the first. I guess I am fond of "magical realism."

Most experimental, avant garde writing will not, I fear, pass the test of time. No one has mentioned Finnegan's Wake, which I find unreadable, sad to say. The Portrait and Ulysses please me, however.

For American literature, I think Moby Dick is quite deep, and quite good.
Message: Posted by: landmark (Oct 25, 2011 05:46AM)
Any John Barth fans out there? It's been years since I've read anything by him, but I was highly impressed with The Floating Opera and Giles Goat Boy when I was younger.

From Joyce, I found I couldn't get through Finnegan's Wake either, and much preferred the relative minimalism of Dubliners.

As a one-off, I greatly enjoyed Peter Quinn's wonderful Banished Children of Eve, a story that covers much of the same territory as Scorsese's movie Gangs of New York, but does it much better. It gives a wonderful view of the minstrel and variety show era, and the underlying racial and ethnic conflicts, in 19th century New York City. Highly recommended.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 25, 2011 05:52AM)
That last story in Dubliners is a gem.
Message: Posted by: kcg5 (Oct 25, 2011 06:03AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 13:47, stoneunhinged wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 13:01, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:43, Magnus Eisengrim wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 12:04, landmark wrote:
Apocalypse Now.
[/quote]

But still a pale shadow of Conrad's novel.

John
[/quote]

I've always been astounded that Heart of Darkness was written in Conrad's THIRD (!!!!!!) language.
[/quote]

Me too. The man had a great gift.

And I agree that Heart of Darkness remains chilling and extraordinary.

But Apocalypse Now isn't just a "pale shadow"; rather, an interesting interpretation very much worth seeing. Just don't buy the director's cut. I despise the director's cut.
[/quote]

You mean the redux? With the french plantation?
Message: Posted by: kcg5 (Oct 25, 2011 06:06AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:00, critter wrote:
So it's just me for Hard Target?
[/quote]


No, I am a fan also.. When I ask my iphone "what is the meaning of life" she has (twice) told me "42"....
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 25, 2011 08:01AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 06:52, Woland wrote:
That last story in Dubliners is a gem.
[/quote]

I agree with pretty much your entire previous post, Woland (but I haven't spent a year on [i]A la recherche du temps perdu[/i] yet). But since this thread is about deep films, John Huston's film of The Dead is fantastic. Not "deep" in the sense that began the thread, but very deep emotionally.

John
Message: Posted by: Woland (Oct 25, 2011 08:46AM)
Yes, Magnus, thank you. I have seen that lovely film. It does capture the depth of the story very well indeed. Since we're back on movies, let me mention two short films made for children that I have always found rather disturbing, the Red Ballon and White Mane, both by Albert Lamorisse - quite similar in theme. For a deep and disturbing film, what about "In a Lonely Place?"
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 11:26AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 07:06, kcg5 wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:00, critter wrote:
So it's just me for Hard Target?
[/quote]


No, I am a fan also.. When I ask my iphone "what is the meaning of life" she has (twice) told me "42"....
[/quote]

I recently started watching the "Big Bang Theory" on the television and noticed in the pilot episode that the Raj character was wearing a hat that said '42' on it.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 25, 2011 11:37AM)
The current pope was elected on my 42nd birthday. Bad omen or good omen?

I wanted 42 on my jersey when I was coaching the Göttingen women's softball team, but one of our players on the baseball team had already chosen it. (I wore a jersey identical to what the baseball players wore. Truth be told, it seemed stupid to me to reserve that number for him; it wasn't like I was gonna join the baseball team and start whacking curve balls over the fence.) That kid earned my infinite respect for his choice. It's the greatest jersey number in baseball history.
Message: Posted by: Magnus Eisengrim (Oct 25, 2011 11:38AM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 12:26, critter wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 07:06, kcg5 wrote:
[quote]
On 2011-10-24 15:00, critter wrote:
So it's just me for Hard Target?
[/quote]


No, I am a fan also.. When I ask my iphone "what is the meaning of life" she has (twice) told me "42"....
[/quote]

I recently started watching the "Big Bang Theory" on the television and noticed in the pilot episode that the Raj character was wearing a hat that said '42' on it.
[/quote]

IIRC Fox Mulder lived in apartment 42.

JOhn
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 11:40AM)
Oh I never noticed. That would be funny too.
Message: Posted by: kcg5 (Oct 25, 2011 05:23PM)
Jeff, was that robinsons number, or Ripken...? 42 is a "hitchhikers guide...:" thing.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 05:47PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 12:37, stoneunhinged wrote:
The current pope was elected on my 42nd birthday. Bad omen or good omen?
[/quote]

I share my birthday with Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon (LDS) religion.
When I was going to their church they all thought that was cool. When I left the church I think they decided I was the Anti-Smith because I haven't been visited by a missionary since.

Here, let me try a little numerology.
My B-Day is 12-23.
12*2 is 24. 24 is 42 backwards. As 'End of Days' taught me, religious images can appear backwards.
23*2 is 46, and if you take that 6 and divide it by 3, you get 2, leaving 42.
42-23 is 19, which was the age of the Mormon I was dating who talked me into going to the church. I was 24 at the time, a number which we've already covered.

Spooky.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2011 06:20PM)
My birthday is 7/6. 7x6 = 42.
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 06:26PM)
And 7/6=1.166(repeating) 42/1.666=36ish.
36*2=72. 72-30=52, the year Douglas Adams was born.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2011 06:55PM)
[quote]
72-30=52, the year Douglas Adams was born.
[/quote]

Worse yet; 72-30 is really...


42!!!!!!!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 25, 2011 07:12PM)
I was gonna post about Eco's Misreadings, then recalled the Lem item about a (fictional) work composed ala Ulysses but by a computer titled Gigamesh which is so deep that only comparable computer could critique it properly - then decided that one may as well print out the digits of Pi on to pages, bind them into a book, open to some page and start commenting on a string of digits as if they were an aesthetic choice.

I just might be more shallow than my reflection - at least according to my shadow. ;)
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 25, 2011 07:18PM)
* has anyone done a modern takedown on that Joyce work?
IE using blog entries, facebook page references, the drive to wallmart, making coffee at the office, someone deciding what stories go on the news crawl of the local cable station, the prime time lineup skirmish at a network where there's just too many (Fables rip off) of one type of show and no new Simpsons episode to fill in a game that ran short, filling prescriptions, getting frisked and pat down on an airport where the flight is delayed 15 minutes but really an hour...
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2011 07:19PM)
Pi starts out 3.14... 3x14=42
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 25, 2011 07:22PM)
Lobo why is 75! the same as 76!
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Oct 25, 2011 07:23PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 20:22, Jonathan Townsend wrote:
Lobo why is 75! the same as 76!
[/quote]

I don't know...why IS 75! the same as 76!?!
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 25, 2011 07:25PM)
Okay, and now the Bee Gees with "How Deep is Your Love"
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 08:35PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 19:55, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]
72-30=52, the year Douglas Adams was born.
[/quote]

Worse yet; 72-30 is really...


42!!!!!!!
[/quote]

*** my crappy math skills! And that was with a calculator...
Unless we are discussing an alternate universe where 72-30 really does =52.
Message: Posted by: Jonathan Townsend (Oct 25, 2011 08:56PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 21:35, critter wrote:...
Unless we are discussing an alternate universe where 72-30 really does =52.
[/quote]

What do you get if you multiply six by nine?
Message: Posted by: critter (Oct 25, 2011 08:58PM)
Lucky.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Oct 25, 2011 09:10PM)
[quote]
On 2011-10-25 21:58, critter wrote:
Lucky.
[/quote]

The single greatest post in the history of the Internet.

I am in awe, critter.
Message: Posted by: Chessmann (Oct 26, 2011 12:04AM)
"A la Recherche..." plus Monty Python = GOLD
Message: Posted by: The Burnaby Kid (Oct 26, 2011 12:29AM)
Can't speak for all time (too many to take account of at the moment), but the deepest movie I've seen in the last year was "A Serious Man".