(Close Window)
Topic: "Day One" - Simplified "day for any date"
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 15, 2012 04:00PM)
I like to announce the release of [url=http://j.mp/Aq7C4I]"Day One"[/url], my approach to the classic "day for any date" feat.

I developed with the goal of making the presentation appear as fast as possible, as well as simplifying the math and mnemonics involved.

You ask a spectator for the year and month of their birth, and [i]instantly[/i] create a calendar for that month, [url=http://dl.dropbox.com/u/23420016/Day_One_ad.mov]as in this video[/url]. As soon as they finish giving you the information, you immediately start creating the calendar, with no delays!

Entire centuries are covered with less than a third of the mnemonics required by other approaches (with no previous mnemonic experience required). The only math used is a single subtraction, and even that isn't always needed.

"Day One" comes with the notes in PDF form, as well as the mnemonics animated on 4 videos, and two browser-based quizzes. You can use these quizzes in a regular browser, or even in your mobile device! As bonuses, I even include a PDF template for the calendar used, and several relevant and helpful links.

[url=http://j.mp/Aq7C4I]It's available now, at Lybrary.com.[/url]
Message: Posted by: voh002 (Jan 15, 2012 04:18PM)
If you know the e-book "Secret Files" by Vlad, could you please compare this method with yours? I´m using the math from "Secret Files", and think that is a good method, but I am always open for new and improved ways to accomplish this.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 15, 2012 04:52PM)
In Vlad's method in "Secret Files", as in many other day/date methods, the year, month, and date are all turned into representational numbers. In "Day One", this isn't the case - the months are dealt with as months, and the days of the week are dealt with as days of the week, and the year is only briefly dealt with as a number. Also, "Day One" leans more towards the use of mnemonics than does the "Secret Files" approach.

Also, from the standpoint of a spectator, you start instantly creating their birthday calendar after they give you the details, instead of watching you stop and think while you do your mental calculations.

I apologize if that sounds vague, but it's the best I can say without giving away too much about either method.
Message: Posted by: Jim Wilder (Jan 15, 2012 05:09PM)
I was able to proof the initial drafts of Day One, and at the time I saw it, I was greatly impressed with it for various reasons. The first was that it actually adds something new to the Day For Any Day feat- it is not just a new method for the standard feat. Instead of producing the single day, you produce the entire month, along with a calendar that you can hand out and give away. The second part is the presentation speed. You actually have the entire month already in front of you on the calendar before you even need to know the specific date... and it is very quick to produce.

Likewise, if you already perform the standard feat, you typically probably do not give anything away other than just telling the person the day. With this, you actually have something such that the spectator can take it and check, or show it around.

As for learning, all you need to know are a few mnemonics and very little math, actually, there are many instances where no calculating is necessary. Also, as with other things Scott has produced, this has several tools that aid in learning the feat. First, if you have an iPhone or iPad (or any brand or platform I suppose), you can view videos that help learn what you need to know for Day One. Second, there are apps that quiz you during your process of learning. Third, Day One should feature a pdf with the calendar blank that you'll need in performances (you can thank me for that one).

The truth: I know Scott and proofed the initial drafts... so you could say that I was "given" a copy. I already know the standard feat and therefore may have a slight jump on the learning curve for this. However, by the time I was around p. 11 or 12, I had a solid understanding of how to perform the feat... although, I honestly believe the material is EXTREMELY well written and clear to understand, even with no prior experience with this type of feat. Furthermore, I understood the basics of what I needed to know within the first few pages, but again, I know Scott and am already familiar with his writing and teaching style.

I have not performed Day One with a wide audience yet... I have only test run with a few people. However, I will most likely use this instead of the standard feat now. It offers something new and different in that you produce an entire month and calendar you can give away. So I would reasonably assert that if you have any interest in this type of feat, Day One is probably the most accessible and easy method to get into this. I honestly believe the entire concept, approach, and delivery of Day One is brilliant.
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 15, 2012 05:47PM)
Scott was kind enough to let me have an advance copy of Day One. This is a very interesting approach to DFAD. I especially like Scott's brilliant idea of filling in the month calendars as a presentational ploy. This not only allows a very fast start to the effect but also gives something to hand the spectator at the end - especially useful if you print these calendars on the back of your business card. Of course this presentation can easily be adapted for other DFAD methods and I will certainly use this with my own Speed Dating system.

Scott's computational procedure is a variation on the Doomsday method. I have never been a great fan of this method because although it is mathematically clever, it isn't intuitive or neat in my opinion. But Scott has done a very good job of simplifying the steps, especially through the effective use of mnemonics.

Scott's instructions are very thorough and the ebook comes with an extremely impressive set of learning tools. These are a great boon to those who want to learn the Day One system.

Mike
Message: Posted by: John C (Jan 15, 2012 06:22PM)
I find this effect not anyone in particular but the day date in and of itself puzzling.

How many people really know what day they were born on? How would they know you are correct?
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 15, 2012 06:39PM)
John, while there are some people who happen to know the day of the week they're born on, you're right that most don't.

For verification, you should either carry a perpetual calendar book with you, or at least an app on your mobile device that allows you to look up past years (I include links to several such resources in Day One). The mobile app approach makes this feat especially convenient.

I've seen several good angles on this over the years. Some performers limit their presentations to just the past 10 years or so, which can easily be checked on any calendar app. I've even seen on who keeps it just to dates for the past, current, and next years.

If you don't want to limit the years, the are other ploys. Anyone who has Paul Brook's [i]Chrysalis of a Polymath[/i] will know about Paul's way of delaying verification in such a way that keeps them thinking about your performance long after it is over.
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Jan 15, 2012 06:40PM)
John:

Not to sidetrack the thread, but I often ask a birthdate when doing a numerology reading and then say, "oh, it's on a Friday this year, are you taking a long weekend?" or some other comment on the day it falls on. although I don't use the methods discussed here or I the other threads, they cold be used.

Tony
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jan 15, 2012 06:51PM)
You could also tie the request for a date into something inherently meaningful, such as the DOB of a child; I imagine most parents would remember what day of the week that was.
Message: Posted by: John C (Jan 15, 2012 07:18PM)
Let's say I have years of college education... How long does it take to learn something like this?
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 15, 2012 07:57PM)
Depending on your interest and the time you have to put into it, I'd say you could get proficient enough to start routining it for your act in less than a month.
Message: Posted by: OldNick (Jan 16, 2012 03:01AM)
Last week Scott was so kind to send me his "Day One" package(!). Yes, this is not a single pdf file like everybody else produces nowadays, it´s a whole package containing the main ebook as pdf, a calendar template, a handful of videos and a few web-apps.

I can second everything what Jim said in his post above: the teaching is very clear and in a very screen-friendly format, the idea of producing a full month instead of only the given day is a really fresh idea and massively speeds up the calculation/thinking process. Not only you will get teached the basic method in the pdf, you also get a few web-apps (running in every webbrowser) which are quizzes to train the single steps! How nice is that?!

Because many people will ask about the difference of Scott´s method to Vlad´s (ottoEmezzo) method explained in his Secret Files - both are completely different in method AND the idea of presentation. Scott´s method is based almost completely on (easy) mnemonics and visualisation exercises rather than calculations.

One important thing to add: "Day One" is targeted to english speaking performers, but that doesn´t mean foreigners (like me) can´t use this work. The visualisations and mnemonics are based on english words, but with a bit of thinking you can "translate" these things into your own language and make up your own image/word/number links. Of course the videos then will not make any sense for us.

What stands out most for me is that this is not just another "show off" effect, but it connects with people because they will get a present at the end of the routine. It reminds me of my own creation "Stigma Square". They would make a perfect couple! Imagine you have a piece of thick paper, you ask for the birthday of a spectator, then you produce the calendar month of his birth, and then on the back of this paper you create the matching Stigma Square. A complete little act of a math genius, fitting inside your pocket!

BUT there is one really annoying part of "Day One": in my opinion it´s way too cheap! For this extensive work I would have taken at least the double price!

Nico
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 16, 2012 03:51AM)
DFAD is one of those effects that people can really relate to. Not only is it an incredibly impressive feat in its own right (when done fast!) but, in my experience, people not only love testing you out, but also do want to know what day they were born (if they don't already know this) or on what day their birthday will fall next year. DFAD is brilliant for casual, intimate work (completely impromptu and prop-free), but can also be turned into a big stage production if that's your bag.

A month is about right for how long it can take to learn any DFAD method well enough to start performing. I recommend not performing the standard DFAD effect until you can consistently get the day in less than 10 sec, but really you should aim for 5 sec. Scott's Day One idea of filling in the month calendar as you are still determining the actual day is a great way to eliminate any waiting time.

Mike
Message: Posted by: bevbevvybev (Jan 16, 2012 07:22AM)
This sounds very cool.
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Jan 16, 2012 09:52AM)
It really does...
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 16, 2012 11:26AM)
When learning DFAD (Scott's system, or my own, or any other) you may find my free online training and testing tool useful - this will generate random dates and record your errors and average times.

http://www.mindmagician.org/daydate.aspx


Mike
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 16, 2012 12:36PM)
Wow! Thanks for all the great reviews and comments, everyone!

Handy Tip: For those who have bought it, and would like to use the web apps in your mobile device, even while offline, I use [url=http://appshopper.com/search/?search=iSaveWeb]iSaveWeb[/url] to store the web apps. This is an iOS 5 app, but there are similar programs available for Android, as well. For older iOS versions (4.2.1 and before), I've found [url=http://appshopper.com/search/?search=iLunascape]iLunascape[/url] works well.

To save it there, just store the quiz web apps into any publicly accessible web server space, such as your ISP might offer, or your [url=http://db.tt/jLSFiW0]Dropbox[/url] public folder, making sure to get the web address (URL) of each web app. Then, use that URL to access the quiz web apps in iSaveWeb (or whichever app you're using to store them), and make sure to save them as a file (not as a page, or the web apps won't function properly).

I've [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vnfs6pX4TA]moved the demo video to YouTube[/url] now, too.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 19, 2012 01:47AM)
A few more handy tips for "Day One":

* Besides using the included apps, you can also use a [url=http://www.wolframalpha.com/widgets/view.jsp?id=9120863ca620dcc3107236a04cadcf6]Wolfram Alpha Random Date Generator Widget[/url] I've just developed, and even modify it and post it on your site if you like! If you need to check your work, I've developed a [url=http://www.wolframalpha.com/widgets/view.jsp?id=3a68bb282ad2cf3b26990899c41184f8]Calendar Month Generator Widget[/url] just for that, as well.

* Hans-Christian Solka, who posts on the Café as hcs, [url=http://www.lulu.com/product/hardcover/gregorian-calendar-sheets-of-the-years-1582---2399/18717939]sells a nice perpetual calendar booklet[/url] that is perfect for using in this performance. You can use it for verification, and even tell them the page number on which they can find the year! This adds an extra "Rain Man"-type moment to the presentation. As a bonus, the method to determine the page number uses a step you already performed in the "Day One" method, so you can give the page number that much quicker!

For example, if someone gives you the year 1960, and says they were born in October, you quickly create your October 1960 calendar, and then hand them the perpetual calendar booklet, saying, "If you look on page 16, you'll note that there is a full year's calendar, as well as the years to which it applies. Do you see 1960 listed at the top of page 16? Great! Now, if you look at October, what day does your birthday fall on? Great! Just as in the calendar I created for you earlier!"

This makes the verification entertaining, too.
Message: Posted by: Godzilla (Jan 19, 2012 02:06AM)
Will this being a leap year have a variance on a FEB. date?

~G
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 19, 2012 02:39AM)
Assuming you've practiced properly, "Day One" handles leap years just fine.

The only time you need to deal with them is when given January or February as the month. The whole approach to the months, in fact, is built around February, so that month is handled almost automatically (again, as long as you remember you're dealing with a leap year). January is handled almost as easily (it's only a minor change, too).
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 19, 2012 02:43PM)
Scott, thank you very much for mention my book in the Magic Café.
Your Day One is a great book and the best (!) plot for the doomsday algorithm.
The book is very carefully and clear written. Your plot is suitable for an "average man" without months of training.
I warmly recommend this book!
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Jan 19, 2012 03:09PM)
Bought it!
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 22, 2012 01:41PM)
Thanks, Hans-Christian and Nicolino!

If anybody has any further questions or comments, post them here and I'll respond!
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 24, 2012 12:14PM)
Hi

I've bought this and overall I am really happy with it. Some of the references are a little American for a stalwart Brit like me BUT for $9.99 I was buying the method NOT the fine detail, so I have simply modified some of the content offered to suit my own preferences and it is now starting to flow.

Two days ago I had no idea how to perform or deliver this. I have probably spent a maximum of an hour on it (not including the hour or so I spent modifying content to my peculiar Brit preferences) and am already at 80-90% accuracy within 20-25 seconds, so my goal is an hour a day for a month and a 100% accuracy within 5 seconds... Wish me luck!

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 24, 2012 03:25PM)
Thanks, Steve!

Steve does bring up a good point. If, for any reason, you'd prefer to find other associations than the one I teach, here's a simple and effective way to do it:

1) Go to Wikipedia's Category:Integers page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Integers

2) Find the particular number you want to change, and click on that to go there.
For example, if you're looking for a new association for 19, then you'd go to the "19 (number)" page:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/19_(number)

3) Read through, and see what associations strike you as interesting, memorable, and usable.
Continuing with the 19 example, maybe you're a car enthusiast on the side, and decide to use the [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Renault_19]Renault 19[/url].
Sports fan? Maybe Joe Montana in a Kansas City Chiefs uniform or Johnny Unitas in a Colts uniform.
Book fan? Stephen King's Dark Tower series might be your thing.

This way, the exact connections are more meaningful to you, and will probably come to mind quicker.

This is also a handy tip if you later decide you want to develop the mnemonics all the way up to 99.
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 25, 2012 12:03PM)
I love your method Scott :) It's so ingenious and clever. So direct and powerful.
I'd like to find a perpetual calendar (not an app, something to put on stage and visible by everyone), that the spectator can use to check if the day really corresponds to the asked date. Do you know a beautiful object that could allow to do that?
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Jan 25, 2012 12:21PM)
Dorian, check out Al Stanger's "One Sheet Perpetual Calendar" (can be found on his site) - it's a thing of simple beauty!
I'm currently designing one as acrylic sign to hang over my desktop....
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 25, 2012 09:23PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-25 13:03, doriancaudal wrote:
I love your method Scott :) It's so ingenious and clever. So direct and powerful.
I'd like to find a perpetual calendar (not an app, something to put on stage and visible by everyone), that the spectator can use to check if the day really corresponds to the asked date. Do you know a beautiful object that could allow to do that?
[/quote]

First, look in the webapps folder in "Links.html"...it will have some links to perpetual calendars under the "Calendars (Reference)" section.

I mentioned [url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=449528&forum=15&26#17]Hans-Christian Solka's perpetual calendar booklet above[/url], which not only works, but adds an extra theatrical moment.

Here are some others from around the web:
[url=http://www.math.bas.bg/complan/valhrist/cal-tabl.txt]Text version[/url]
[url=http://www.scribd.com/collections/3403959/Perpetual-Calendar]My free PDF perpetual calendar[/url] (400 or 8400 years, depending on how far you take your presentation)
[url=http://www.nikolasschiller.com/blog/index.php/archives/2009/03/05/2508/]A classic chart[/url] (Scroll down for instructions on use)
[url=http://www.archimedes-lab.org/datOmatic.html#tables]Another classic chart[/url]
[url=http://calendarhome.com/tyc/download.html]10,000 year perpetual calendar[/url]
[url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WLa13yczbGI]Video: Mario V. Farina's Calendar Chart[/url] (Wish I could find the book, but you might be able to replicate the chart with careful viewing of the video.)

[url=http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Perpetual_calendars]Wikipedia has a whole section of them[/url], too:
[url=http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Permanent_calendar_greg.svg]From 1582-2799[/url]
[url=http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikitable_calendar]Wikitable calendar[/url]

The complexity of some of these charts can actually be an advantage. When properly used, it suggests you're taking all these factors into account in your head!
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 26, 2012 05:52AM)
The most beautiful perpetual calendar ever is Al Stangers "Hopscotch" (see Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation, pp.20-21).
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 26, 2012 06:45PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-25 13:21, Nicolino wrote:
Dorian, check out Al Stanger's "One Sheet Perpetual Calendar" (can be found on his site) - it's a thing of simple beauty!
I'm currently designing one as acrylic sign to hang over my desktop....
[/quote]

I must be stupid if you mean this one... http://www.cs.umsl.edu/~astanger/StangerCalendar.pdf

Can you give me an example of how you would transpose the date 25 July 1976 to have it provide a result that fits when divided by 5.6 as suggested?

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 27, 2012 09:08AM)
Scott, is there a windows phone app to find all the quizzes (because I think it only works on iPhone)? Indeed, I tried to quizz me with my WP, but it does not work :( (only on the PC).
Message: Posted by: Tony Iacoviello (Jan 27, 2012 09:09AM)
Steve:

I tried it out on several dates, it did not work for me either (perpetual thing, not Scott's work).

Tony
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 27, 2012 09:50AM)
Hi Tony

Maybe one of the maths geniuses (is that right?) on here will give us the low-down.

On Scotts method I agree... BRILLIANT, I am now 3 days in at an hour a day and I am averaging around 10 seconds now. I'm not using any of the suggested short-cuts yet and have kept to 1900 to 2100 for now, when I get this in 5 seconds I will expand the range and look at the shortcuts.

Once again a superb method Scott.

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 27, 2012 12:42PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 10:08, doriancaudal wrote:
Scott, is there a windows phone app to find all the quizzes (because I think it only works on iPhone)? Indeed, I tried to quizz me with my WP, but it does not work :( (only on the PC).
[/quote]

The quizzes are designed to run in any web browser that supports HTML5 and CSS3 (mobile, desktop, OR laptop).

It's designed using jQuery Mobile, and according to the documentation, should work fine on Windows Phone 7-7.5. It was tested on HTC Surround (7.0) HTC Trophy (7.5), and LG-E900 (7.5).

What happens when you try and run it?
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 27, 2012 12:44PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 10:50, mag1cman wrote:
Hi Tony

Maybe one of the maths geniuses (is that right?) on here will give us the low-down.

On Scotts method I agree... BRILLIANT, I am now 3 days in at an hour a day and I am averaging around 10 seconds now. I'm not using any of the suggested short-cuts yet and have kept to 1900 to 2100 for now, when I get this in 5 seconds I will expand the range and look at the shortcuts.

Once again a superb method Scott.

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

Thanks, Steve! It's great to hear how quickly you're progressing!
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 27, 2012 05:35PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 10:09, Tony Iacoviello wrote:
Steve:

I tried it out on several dates, it did not work for me either (perpetual thing, not Scott's work).

Tony
[/quote]

Hi again Tony

I contacted Mr Stanger directly and he gave me an answer which once revealed was blindingly obvious, in a nutshell it was this...

"When you do the division you will have two digits immediately to the right of the decimal point (let's call this your 'change'). Imagine the days are a shopping list and every day has a price (shown in the box). What is the most expensive day that your 'change' can buy? That is the day for the calculation"

Simple and elegant once you "get it" :)

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jan 27, 2012 05:51PM)
Hans-Christian was referring to this:
http://www.cs.umsl.edu/~astanger/DayOfWeek.pdf
You can find instructions in Hans-Christian's definitive "Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation."
No calculator required. It's pure "look-up." AND it easily handles ANY date, Julian OR Gregorian.

Al Stanger
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 28, 2012 05:27AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 13:42, Scott Cram wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 10:08, doriancaudal wrote:
Scott, is there a windows phone app to find all the quizzes (because I think it only works on iPhone)? Indeed, I tried to quizz me with my WP, but it does not work :( (only on the PC).
[/quote]

The quizzes are designed to run in any web browser that supports HTML5 and CSS3 (mobile, desktop, OR laptop).

It's designed using jQuery Mobile, and according to the documentation, should work fine on Windows Phone 7-7.5. It was tested on HTC Surround (7.0) HTC Trophy (7.5), and LG-E900 (7.5).

What happens when you try and run it?
[/quote]

I've got an HTC Mozart, the quizz page loads, but the active links on it are not working :(
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 28, 2012 01:50PM)
I had to do a little research, but I've found the problem.

Windows Phone 7's built-in browser doesn't yet support CSS3 (when the links are clicked, there's a simple CSS3 transition to the page). It's still based on the IE7 CSS rendering engine.

I've updated the program to eliminate the CSS3 transitions when support is not available, and I've already sent the updated version to Chris at Lybrary.com. As soon as he posts the update, you should get an e-mail that it's available.

If anyone finds any other problems with the apps (or the videos or PDFs, for that matter), please let me know here!

From what I understand, the built-in WP7 browser will support CSS3 before the end of the year, so when that does happen the transitions should be viewable on your Windows Phone.
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 29, 2012 08:45AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-28 14:50, Scott Cram wrote:
I had to do a little research, but I've found the problem.

Windows Phone 7's built-in browser doesn't yet support CSS3 (when the links are clicked, there's a simple CSS3 transition to the page). It's still based on the IE7 CSS rendering engine.

I've updated the program to eliminate the CSS3 transitions when support is not available, and I've already sent the updated version to Chris at Lybrary.com. As soon as he posts the update, you should get an e-mail that it's available.

If anyone finds any other problems with the apps (or the videos or PDFs, for that matter), please let me know here!

From what I understand, the built-in WP7 browser will support CSS3 before the end of the year, so when that does happen the transitions should be viewable on your Windows Phone.
[/quote]

Thanks Scott! I am waiting for Chris to email me the new version ;)
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Jan 29, 2012 10:49AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-27 18:51, stanalger wrote:
Hans-Christian was referring to this:
http://www.cs.umsl.edu/~astanger/DayOfWeek.pdf
You can find instructions in Hans-Christian's definitive "Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation."
No calculator required. It's pure "look-up." AND it easily handles ANY date, Julian OR Gregorian.

Al Stanger
[/quote]
Wow, Mr. Stanger himself is posting!
I'm honored to have received an email from him and can't show enough respect for his beautiful Hopscotch method! I really dig it and want to perpetuate (no pun intended!) it by creating a large acrylic version of it!
Message: Posted by: stanalger (Jan 29, 2012 06:49PM)
I'm flattered, Nicolino. But let's get back to Scott Cram's [i]Day One[/i]!

Al
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 30, 2012 05:08AM)
Hi

Am now at 6 days and averaging 5-7 seconds so very near to my 5 second goal. The 5 seconds are really now just auto-recall the 7 seconds are the ones where I am still having to think a little bit :)

This does pose a question for me - If I have 3 that I know I am 'struggling' (and I use that in the lightest sense) with, at this stage, should I look at a new Mnemonic, or should I stick with what I have gone with and push through?

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 30, 2012 10:31AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 06:08, mag1cman wrote:
Hi

Am now at 6 days and averaging 5-7 seconds so very near to my 5 second goal. The 5 seconds are really now just auto-recall the 7 seconds are the ones where I am still having to think a little bit :)

This does pose a question for me - If I have 3 that I know I am 'struggling' (and I use that in the lightest sense) with, at this stage, should I look at a new Mnemonic, or should I stick with what I have gone with and push through?

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

Dear Steve,
When you say 5-7 seconds, do you mean the time to find the correct day to fill the calendar page, or the time to find the actual day for a precise date, without any printed calendar? I am at about 10 sec to find the correct day for a precise date. For instance, they say me "May 19, 1347", and I need about 10 sec to say "friday".
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 30, 2012 10:46AM)
May 19, 1347 was a Saturday.
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 30, 2012 10:48AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 11:46, hcs wrote:
May 19, 1347 was a Saturday.
[/quote]

Wrong!! It was a Friday ;)
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 30, 2012 11:09AM)
The Gregorian Calendar is not a proleptic one. On October 15th 1582 Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian calendar. October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar. The Gregorian calendar was adopted on 14 September 1752 in Britain and the British Empire (including parts of the later United States).

May 19 1347 was a Saturday regardless of which christian country.
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 30, 2012 11:38AM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 11:31, doriancaudal wrote:

Dear Steve,
When you say 5-7 seconds, do you mean the time to find the correct day to fill the calendar page, or the time to find the actual day for a precise date, without any printed calendar? I am at about 10 sec to find the correct day for a precise date. For instance, they say me "May 19, 1347", and I need about 10 sec to say "friday".
[/quote]

Yes I mean 5-7 seconds to give a day without writing out the days using a blank calendar.

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 30, 2012 12:05PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 12:09, hcs wrote:
The Gregorian Calendar is not a proleptic one. On October 15th 1582 Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian calendar. October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar. The Gregorian calendar was adopted on 14 September 1752 in Britain and the British Empire (including parts of the later United States).

May 19 1347 was a Saturday regardless of which christian country.
[/quote]

Ok, so how to deal with that with Scott's method?

Another question for Steve, concerning the last step we have to do to find the actual day for a date. Let's say you know that March 7 is a friday, and you need to answer for March, 18, how do you do that quickly? It's here that I loose some time I think (14 is a friday too, sat 15, sun 16, mon 17 and Tuesday 18: which takes me about one sec to do)...
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 30, 2012 12:13PM)
Hi Dorian

I think it's just down to the speed that I do the mental math at.

If it's faster I also go past and backwards so in the example that you give if I know that 7 is a Friday and I want the 18 I KNOW that 21 is a Friday and go backwards to 18 - This is one step less than your counting up - one step could be 1/2 a second in this case. How I know to go below and count up or go past and count back I'm not sure and I put this down to gut instinct.

The other thing that I think that I do isn't related to my effort learning this effect, it is something that I have done since I was a kid and I now do with my kids which is 'Day Maths'.

So in my head Monday = 1, Tuesday = 2 etc. I am always asking my kids What does Monday + Wednesday + Saturday - Tuesday come to? They answer "8" BUT we also ask questions like what is Friday + Tuesday - 3 + Sunday - 5 = 6

So in my world (or my head) if the Doomsday date of 7 = Friday therefore 21 INSTANTLY = Friday - 3 (to get to 18) INSTANTLY = Tuesday. Because doing "Day Math" I know that Friday - 3 = Tuesday.

Hope that this helps.

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Jan 30, 2012 12:16PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:13, mag1cman wrote:

So in my head Monday = 1, Tuesday = 2 etc. I am always asking my kids What does Monday + Wednesday + Saturday - Tuesday come to? They answer "8" BUT we also ask questions like what is Friday + Tuesday - 3 + Sunday - 5 = 6

So in my world (or my head) if the Doomsday date of 7 = Friday therefore 21 INSTANTLY = Friday - 3 (to get to 18) INSTANTLY = Tuesday. Because doing "Day Math" I know that Friday - 3 = Tuesday.

Hope that this helps.

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

Perhaps Scott could write us a little Web App that would fire simple "Day Math" questions at us e.g. Friday - 4 = ? to help people get practised in the deduction of one day from another?

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Jan 30, 2012 12:19PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:16, mag1cman wrote:

Perhaps Scott could write us a little Web App that would fire simple "Day Math" questions at us e.g. Friday - 4 = ? to help people get practised in the deduction of one day from another?

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

The app that I think is missing in all the wonderful work Scott did is an app that would ask for a date, and would need a day as an answer, not a complete month to fill by placing the doomsday in front of the right number. Do you guys see what I mean?
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 30, 2012 12:50PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:19, doriancaudal wrote:
[quote]
The app that I think is missing in all the wonderful work Scott did is an app that would ask for a date, and would need a day as an answer, not a complete month to fill by placing the doomsday in front of the right number. Do you guys see what I mean?
[/quote]

My free web app does exactly this and also calculates your times and errors.

http://www.mindmagician.org/daydate.aspx

My Speed Dating ebook (which teaches a completely different method from Scott's) includes a version of this testing app that will run without an internet connection.

http://www.lybrary.com/speed-dating-p-119767.html

Mike
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 30, 2012 03:28PM)
A better title for the "Calendar Quiz" app would be Doomsday Month Calendar Quiz.

@ doriancaudal
Calculation of Julian Calendar Doomsday: see Solka's "Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation", p. 161.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 30, 2012 03:58PM)
[quote]
On 2012-01-29 09:45, doriancaudal wrote:

Thanks Scott! I am waiting for Chris to email me the new version ;)
[/quote]

As the purchasers have probably already discovered, the updated version is now available at Lybrary.com.

[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:05, doriancaudal wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-01-30 12:09, hcs wrote:
The Gregorian Calendar is not a proleptic one. On October 15th 1582 Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian calendar. October 4, 1582 of the Julian calendar was followed by October 15 in the new calendar. The Gregorian calendar was adopted on 14 September 1752 in Britain and the British Empire (including parts of the later United States).

May 19 1347 was a Saturday regardless of which christian country.
[/quote]

Ok, so how to deal with that with Scott's method?

Another question for Steve, concerning the last step we have to do to find the actual day for a date. Let's say you know that March 7 is a friday, and you need to answer for March, 18, how do you do that quickly? It's here that I loose some time I think (14 is a friday too, sat 15, sun 16, mon 17 and Tuesday 18: which takes me about one sec to do)...
[/quote]

As with the rest of Day One, I handle it very simply - I never go back beyond 1800 (since the Gregorian calendar wasn't adopted in the US until 1752).

Here's an excellent timeline of when various countries adopted it:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar#Timeline

Adjusting to the Julian calendar can be somewhat tricky, so the simplest approach is just to avoid it altogether. Since you're trying to make the calendar you create meaningful anyway, sticking to anniversaries, birthdays, and other special days will keep you well within the 1900s and 2000s for now.

[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:16, mag1cman wrote:
[
Perhaps Scott could write us a little Web App that would fire simple "Day Math" questions at us e.g. Friday - 4 = ? to help people get practised in the deduction of one day from another?

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

The "Day Math" questions is interesting, as I'm working on a book of related feats for Day One, and this type of math will be needed. I guess I'll have to add a web app for it! ;)

(Yes, this would be provided at no extra charge as an update.)

Handy tip, to go from one day of the week to another day of the week, you should never need to go back or forth more than 3 days. Friday - 4 is more easily performed as Friday + 3, since you'll get the same day of the week.

[quote]
On 2012-01-30 13:19, doriancaudal wrote:

The app that I think is missing in all the wonderful work Scott did is an app that would ask for a date, and would need a day as an answer, not a complete month to fill by placing the doomsday in front of the right number. Do you guys see what I mean?
[/quote]

With Day One, you shouldn't have to do any math concerning the date.

The advantage of creating the calendar is that you have the whole month in front of you, and then you just FIND the 18th (or whatever) and see what day it's on as you circle it!

Think of it as creating a cheat sheet that you can openly use in front of your audience.

If you do want to be quizzed on a particular day, you can do so at the site Michael mentions above...
http://www.mindmagician.org/daydate.aspx

...or at my own site, as well:
http://gmmentalgym.blogspot.com/2011/03/day-of-week-for-any-date-quiz-revised.html

As long as I'm working on new web apps anyway, I might be able to develop one like that, however. Is there any other interest?

[quote]
On 2012-01-30 16:28, hcs wrote:
A better title for the "Calendar Quiz" app would be Doomsday Month Calendar Quiz.

@ doriancaudal
Calculation of Julian Calendar Doomsday: see Solka's "Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation", p. 161.
[/quote]

True, but space was at a premium in the notes and on the screen.

Here on the forums, "Doomsday Month Calendar Quiz" might be a clearer way to refer to it, however.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 30, 2012 09:11PM)
Handy calendar trivia for all those performing "Day One" in 2012:

2012 has 3 Friday the 13ths.

The first one was back in January.

The next one is in April, exactly 13 weeks later.

The final one is in July, exactly 13 weeks after April's Friday the 13th.

This will happen again in 2040, 2068, and 2096.
Message: Posted by: hcs (Jan 31, 2012 04:58AM)
The next 3 Fridays the 13ths - but in February, March and November - will be in 2015. 3 Fridays the 13ths are the maximal number in a year. Minimum between 2 Fridays the 13ths are 4 weeks. Maximum are 61 weeks.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 2, 2012 11:33PM)
I'm working on an update for "Day One".

The update will consist of updated versions of the web apps, so that they work on more mobile devices, an additional book containing several bonus feats, and a new web app to help you practice the bonus feats.

It's almost done, so you can expect to see this update as soon as next week.
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Feb 3, 2012 02:15AM)
Great work, Scott! Thanks!!
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Feb 3, 2012 04:24AM)
Nice! Continue with your great work, Scott ;)
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Feb 5, 2012 01:39PM)
Scott's update for Day One has some very interesting bonus features that can be used to build a more extended calendar routine. Alternatively, each bonus feature can stand alone.

I especially like Scott's method for determining the day of a person's 65th birthday (retirement day). Not only is this very simple to do, once you know the birth day, but it can be used with ANY Day-for-Date procedure, not just Scott's Day One.

Other bonus features allow you to determine easily which months in a year have a Friday 13th, and also which months have five of any given day. There is also a more direct method for determining the day of the week without needing to go through Scott's calendar procedure.

The update also includes a set of extra browser-based tools for learning and practising these effects.

Overall, Scott has developed a great Doomsday package that is real value for money.

Mike
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 5, 2012 02:19PM)
I'll be sending the update that Michael mentions to Lybrary.com later today, so you may be notified about the updated version from them as soon as Monday.
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 5, 2012 08:23PM)
...or perhaps even sooner. Chris just posted the [url=http://www.lybrary.com/day-one-p-137029.html]updated version at Lybrary.com[/url]!
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Feb 6, 2012 04:08AM)
:applause:
Message: Posted by: doriancaudal (Feb 6, 2012 06:48AM)
[quote]
On 2012-02-05 21:23, Scott Cram wrote:
...or perhaps even sooner. Chris just posted the [url=http://www.lybrary.com/day-one-p-137029.html]updated version at Lybrary.com[/url]!
[/quote]

Great ;)
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 6, 2012 11:44AM)
[quote]
On 2012-02-06 05:08, Nicolino wrote:
:applause:
[/quote]

Send some of that clapping to Dorian, who helped me improve the apps on non-Android/non-iOS devices by testing it on Windows Phone for me.

[quote]
On 2012-02-06 07:48, doriancaudal wrote:

Great ;)
[/quote]

Thanks, Dorian! Hopefully, the new web app works on on WP7?
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 9, 2012 05:34PM)
Dr. Solka, in his Encyclopedia of Weekday Calculation, has some further references on some of the bonus feats. I don't have the book myself, but he has passed the following references on to me.

Turning 65:
See his own original work related to the Turning 65 in chapter 1.3. "Konvertierungen und Zyklen", 1.3.1. "Verschiebungen", pp. 37/38.

Friday the 13th:
Chapter 11.4. "Freitag, der 13.", page 174. Julian Havil: „Verblüfft?! – Mathematische Beweise unglaublicher Ideen“ ([url=http://books.google.com/books?id=V78la30kp0kC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA146#v=twopage&q&f=false]Google Preview link[/url]), S. 145-149; 151 Springer Verlag, Berlin und Heidelberg, 2009

The book was published in English by the same author as "Nonplussed!: Mathematical Proof of Implausible Ideas" ([url=http://books.google.com/books?id=lQ0N9H793GQC&lpg=PP1&pg=PA151#v=twopage&q&f=false]Google Preview Link[/url]).
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 28, 2012 08:16PM)
If you haven't picked up [i]Day One[/i] yet, it will be on sale on Feb. 29th (1 day only!) for $6.99 (30% off)!

Available here, along with more details: http://www.lybrary.com/day-one-p-137029.html
Message: Posted by: mag1cman (Feb 29, 2012 02:16AM)
I GENUINELY don't usually plug things on the Café as I think that on the whole there's too much of it going on BUT I do have to say that I love this, use it daily as a simple Ice-breaker with people (I use it as a lead in to numerology type discussions) and I got it down to 5(ish) seconds in under 2 weeks with just a little practise each day.

It comes with great add on supporting materials and additional routines which I was pleasantly surprised to receive as a free of charge update when he published them AFTER I'd bought the original from Scott.

It genuinely is a bargain at today's sale price.

Respect to all
Steve
Message: Posted by: EricDraven (Feb 29, 2012 03:08AM)
Took advantage of the sale!
:)
Many thanks!
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 29, 2012 02:23PM)
[quote]
On 2012-02-29 03:16, mag1cman wrote:
I GENUINELY don't usually plug things on the Café as I think that on the whole there's too much of it going on BUT I do have to say that I love this, use it daily as a simple Ice-breaker with people (I use it as a lead in to numerology type discussions) and I got it down to 5(ish) seconds in under 2 weeks with just a little practise each day.

It comes with great add on supporting materials and additional routines which I was pleasantly surprised to receive as a free of charge update when he published them AFTER I'd bought the original from Scott.

It genuinely is a bargain at today's sale price.

Respect to all
Steve
[/quote]

Congrats, Steve! I'm glad to hear you're using it often. Thanks for the compliments, too!

[quote]
On 2012-02-29 04:08, EricDraven wrote:
Took advantage of the sale!
:)
Many thanks!
[/quote]

Thanks, Eric!
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Feb 29, 2012 10:37PM)
Due to the response from the sale, as well as the fact that Lybrary.com announced the sale a little late in their newsletter, the sale is being extended through this Sunday!
Message: Posted by: ajb6864 (Mar 1, 2012 02:20PM)
I picked it up and I'm looking forward to reading it this weekend.

I'm still using a version from an old-ish Stanton Carlisle book, so I'd be interested to see what you've added to this old favourite!
Message: Posted by: wulfiesmith (Apr 19, 2012 01:19PM)
Best $9.99 I ever spent ...
the documentation and learning support is first class.
Message: Posted by: wulfiesmith (Apr 19, 2012 02:46PM)
Incidentally, has anyone tried a Date for earlier centuries ?
I have tried the 1700's and found the adjustments are not consistent throughout the century.

This is not a negative post.
I am wondering if I am doing something wrong here.

Please PM me with any thoughts ...

regards,
Wulfie
Message: Posted by: John C (Apr 19, 2012 04:14PM)
[quote]
On 2012-02-29 03:16, mag1cman wrote:
I GENUINELY don't usually plug things on the Café as I think that on the whole there's too much of it going on BUT ...
Steve
[/quote]

Now you see why there's a lot of plugging going on. It all adds up. ;)

John
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Apr 19, 2012 04:42PM)
[quote]
On 2012-04-19 15:46, wulfiesmith wrote:
Incidentally, has anyone tried a Date for earlier centuries ?
I have tried the 1700's and found the adjustments are not consistent throughout the century.

This is not a negative post.
I am wondering if I am doing something wrong here.

Please PM me with any thoughts ...

regards,
Wulfie
[/quote]

The dates are not consistent throughout the 1700s because Britain and its American colonies switched from the Julian calendar to the Gregorian calendar in 1752. The day after Wednesday, 2 September 1752 in Britain and the American colonies was, believe it or not, Thursday, 14 September 1752!

When performing Day One, I mostly stick to the 1900s and 2000s, since those dates have more meaning and thus can have more impact. If someone is really curious about a particular historical date, I warn them that I've only memorized the Gregorian calendar, so I won't know dates before 1753.

Also, remember that the 1700s (after 1753 anyway), can be adjusted for by [b][i]subtracting[/i][/b] 2 from its equivalent doomsday in the 2000s. For 1776, you'd work out the doomsday for 2076, then step back 2 days to get 1776's doomsday.

Trivia: George Washington was born on February 11, 1732, not February 22, 1732. It wasn't until the calendar change in 1752, with its 11-day adjustment, that his birthday had to be moved forward 11 days. Bummed that George Washington's birthday is rarely celebrated on George Washington's actual birthday? George Washington had the same problem!

[quote]
On 2012-04-19 14:19, wulfiesmith wrote:
Best $9.99 I ever spent ...
the documentation and learning support is first class.
[/quote]

:)

Thanks!
Message: Posted by: wulfiesmith (Apr 19, 2012 05:19PM)
Fantastic stuff Scott!
now it all makes sense,

Wulfie
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (May 31, 2012 04:43PM)
I posted some additional touches to Day One on my blog today:
http://headinside.blogspot.com/2012/05/day-one-touches.html

Pay special attention to the "Christmas and Halloween" method of working out the doomsday. From your point of view, you're subtly working out the doomsday verbally in front of the audience. From the audience's point of view, they've had their first moment of amazement before the month is even named.
Message: Posted by: Dan Dent (Jan 1, 2015 07:12AM)
Can Scott's version be 'performed' without refering to the calendar chart or filling in the days on it? I'm completely new to the Day For Any Date world and am looking to incorporate it into my Numerology readings.
Message: Posted by: Relick666 (Jan 2, 2015 10:03AM)
Can this only be bought from lybrary.com?
Message: Posted by: Dan Dent (Jan 2, 2015 10:35AM)
Bought it. Learned it. Love it!
Message: Posted by: Dan Dent (Jan 3, 2015 05:46AM)
....BUT, unless I'm missing something very obvious, Scott's system does not automatically identify Leap Years. This is left to the performer to calculate them self, before the correct date for February or January can be used. I Would find it useful if he had detailed his method for remembering the Leap Years (if that is how he does it).

I have noticed that, if the first number of the last two digits in the year is even (including 0), then a 0, 4 or 8 as the last numeber equals a leap year.

Similarly, if the first number of the last two digits in the year is odd, then a 2 or 6 as the last number equals a leap year.

This works very well, but having to make the calculations only slows up the system.

STILL, I think Day One is excellent and doesn't, actually, require a lot of work to learn.
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 3, 2015 06:28AM)
You also need to remember that century years, e.g. 1600, 1700, 1800, 1900, 2000 are only leap years if the full year is divisible by 400 without remainder.

I.e., 1600 and 2000 were leap years, but 1700, 1800, and 1900 were not.

Mike
Message: Posted by: Dan Dent (Jan 3, 2015 06:46AM)
Michael,

Thanks for the reply. Speed Dating is next on my list :)

I'm purely using the system to add a little extra spice to my Numerology readings, so the 1900s is as far back as I need to go.
Message: Posted by: RedDevil (Jan 3, 2015 06:59PM)
Posting a suggestion in Inner Thoughts on this topic...
Message: Posted by: Michael Daniels (Jan 4, 2015 02:56AM)
I find this is the simplest way to test for leap years:

1. Is YY even? If so ...
2. Is half of YY also even?

If the answer to both is yes, it is a leap year (though remember the additional rule for 00).

E.g. 68 and 76 are leap years, 66, 71 and 74 are not.

Mike
Message: Posted by: Scott Cram (Jan 7, 2015 01:17AM)
Day One, normally $9.99, is on sale for the next week for only $6.99, as a New Year's sale!

Available at Lybrary.com: http://www.lybrary.com/day-one-p-137029.html
Message: Posted by: Gorgeous (Jan 7, 2015 02:18AM)
Went ahead and picked this up, thanks for the sale :p
Message: Posted by: PhilJake (Jan 28, 2018 09:47PM)
Well I decided to buy Day One today and read through the posts. Just wanted to correct a trivia error typo posted earlier.
George Washington was born on February 11, 1731 (not 1732) according to the Julian calendar. When the Gregorian calendar was adopted his birthday became February 22, 1732, a year and 11 days later.
February 11 1731, Julian was Thursday.
February 22 1732 Gregorian was Friday.
So George was born on two different days. An interesting story when revealing days of the week.
Message: Posted by: aligator (Oct 22, 2018 06:28PM)
How long would it take a senior with average math skills but possibly higher than average IQ, to learn this? Days? time per day?
Message: Posted by: loserdlj (Feb 28, 2019 06:52PM)
This sounds very cool.