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Topic: Why guitar?
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 12:44PM)
Harmonicas are smaller, cheaper, easier to play, and just as expressive. If I can get the same bang for less bucks without having to lug around a honkin' guitar, then it seems like a stupid notion not to choose the Mississippi Saxophone (harmonica.)
Even my Backpacker guitar was big enough to get me searched by the fuzz when some dope thought it was a sniper rifle. So if I hadn't brought my guitar to play that day I'd have never been searched by the 5-0, which means I was stupid for playing guitar.
It would have been much smarter to pocket a blues harp.

I think a certain challenge issuer now owes me a ten-spot ;)
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 13, 2012 01:07PM)
Chicks.


Like.


Guitar players.
Message: Posted by: mvmagic (Jul 13, 2012 01:13PM)
And its a better visual when you smash a guitar on a monitor on stage. What would you do with a harmonica? Step on it? :)
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 13, 2012 01:16PM)
Swallow it, like in that old Vaudville routine?

Look, I wish the chicks swarmed after banjo players.

Hm.

Actually, maybe they do. Maybe it's just me?
Message: Posted by: mvmagic (Jul 13, 2012 01:20PM)
Of course! And have harmonized farts the next day.

Dunno about chicks and banjo players...well maybe in the deliverance neighborhood...
Message: Posted by: Pecan_Creek (Jul 13, 2012 01:37PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 14:20, mvmagic wrote:
Of course! And have harmonized farts the next day.

Dunno about chicks and banjo players...well maybe in the deliverance neighborhood...
[/quote]

Umm... that wasn't a chick in the movie!

Soouuuuuweeeeeee
Message: Posted by: Slide (Jul 13, 2012 02:25PM)
"Harmonicas are smaller, cheaper, easier to play, and just as expressive."

I love a good harmonica player but you can't sing when you play the harmonica. And chicks love it when you sing . ;)
Message: Posted by: Jeff J. (Jul 13, 2012 03:34PM)
Playing guitar is relaxing. Perhaps because I've been doing it since I was little. My first love is the keyboard though.
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Jul 13, 2012 04:50PM)
I switched to harmonica after many years of guitar. It has some very nice advantages as mentioned. But doing diatonic blues, you gotta carry about 6 around to be able to sit in... might go back to my Xaphoon...
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 13, 2012 05:08PM)
[quote]On 2012-07-13 14:16, stoneunhinged wrote:
I wish the chicks swarmed after banjo players.[/quote]
I have two long-neck banjos. Three extra frets so I can go down low.

Can a banjo feed you? Sure. At certain festivals I stroll around in the morning, picking and saying, "Good morning," to other campers. They feed me... Probably to stop me from playing.

For the record, I play guitar too, with one of them fancy neck bracket harp holders. So lest anyone think the thread is being highjacked by banjo players.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 13, 2012 05:34PM)
Q: Why guitar?
A: Buckethead.


For the rockers:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vYxrdrzmuUw

For the mellow:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9bEiGC8mm_Q

For the Miles Davis fans:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx4QkA2Dtx0

For the romantics:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8akmP6Sjv2o

For anyone who wants to remember what it felt like to see the sun set over the ocean for the first time:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqHQyQHu-RE

For fans of all things Halloween:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXZTxAUqGL4

For the finger-flickers:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=czpwrg8zNls

And finally, one just for Critter:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=48c4hOI9LyE
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 13, 2012 05:57PM)
I am unable to learn the harmonica because I hae no talent. To show you I try I have my 532/20 MS BLUES HARP IN C right here and I bleat on it every night

Screw all of you harp players for making me feel bad. In Canada you would be arrested . A special evil eye to Andrew Whimhurst who I otherwise really like but he plays one hell of a harp and guitar (find Chase The Ace by The Groove KingsK.

I can't juggle
I can't play an instrument
I can't see my feet

Stop the hate!
Message: Posted by: magicalaurie (Jul 13, 2012 05:59PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 13:44, critter wrote:
It would have been much smarter to pocket a blues harp.
[/quote]

Or a jaw harp.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 06:03PM)
If chicks were smart they'd go after the harmonica players, for reasons I shan't reveal ;)
You can make a... uh... firecracker... using a harmonica case.
You wanna hear a great harp blower who can also sing?
Check it out:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8-CKwqQxRE


Now, Junior's partnership with Buddy Guy actually illustrates why [i]both[/i] instruments are great!
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 06:03PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 18:59, magicalaurie wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 13:44, critter wrote:
It would have been much smarter to pocket a blues harp.
[/quote]

Or a jaw harp.
[/quote]

You win!
Message: Posted by: magicalaurie (Jul 13, 2012 06:09PM)
:bg:
Message: Posted by: Steve_Mollett (Jul 13, 2012 06:10PM)
Now if you play guitar and harmonica together, you can be a Bob Dylan-style folk singer.
By the by, If I'm not mistaken, tomorrow is the centennial of the birth of Woody Guthrie.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 13, 2012 06:11PM)
Everybody loves some fancy down home spoon playing! (Especially at the table for impromptu dinner time entertainment in finer restaurants!)
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 06:16PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 19:11, mastermindreader wrote:
Everybody loves some fancy down home spoon playing! (Especially at the table for impromptu dinner time entertainment in finer restaurants!)
[/quote]

I never thought my act would be stolen by a legend! ;)
Message: Posted by: magicalaurie (Jul 13, 2012 06:16PM)
Yes! You're right. Wow, it's been awhile since I picked up a pair of spoons!
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 06:19PM)
Except that every time I do I start singing Soundgarden.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 13, 2012 07:04PM)
Jaw harp? You sure that is the name?

The only way I could get a girl with a guitar is to knock her out with it.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 07:19PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-13 18:34, LobowolfXXX wrote:
Q: Why guitar?
A: Buckethead.

And finally, one just for Critter:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=endscreen&NR=1&v=48c4hOI9LyE
[/quote]

Used to have this one on my "iPod" as one of my deadlifting songs. Buckethead's coming here but I don't have the money :(
Message: Posted by: Mr. Mystoffelees (Jul 13, 2012 08:10PM)
An then, there are the singers who are also great harmonica players...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bKM5LpFU1Pc
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 13, 2012 08:56PM)
I really wonder if any of you believe Jewish people are offended by the more common and not ever used as an insult Jews Harp? Amazing.

Hey guitar players I have a question based on ignorance. Why not call it a jewtar? I'm kidding. I know a guy who sells electonic devices to Gibson Guitars and I ead up o Guitars cu while I have seen then I don't know anything about them. They now, or maybe always have, I don't know, they have acoustic electric guitars. Is this just an acoustic guitar with a built in mic so you don't need an extra mic stand or does it give it the note extending qualities of an electric guitar?
Message: Posted by: landmark (Jul 13, 2012 09:44PM)
From wikipedia:

[quote]There are many theories for the origin of the name Jew's harp. One proposed explanation is that it is a corruption of "jaws harp", while a less likely explanation espoused by some is that its name comes from "juice harp" from the amount of saliva produced when played by inexperienced players. While the "jaw" variant is attested at least as early as 1774[6] and 1809[7], the "juice" variant appeared only in the late 19th and 20th centuries. It has also been suggested that the name derives from the French "Jeu-trompe" meaning "toy-trumpet".[8]

The Oxford English Dictionary calls theories that the name is a corruption of "jaws" or "jeu" "baseless and inept" and goes on to say, "More or less satisfactory reasons may be conjectured: e.g. that the instrument was actually made, sold, or sent to England by Jews, or supposed to be so; or that it was attributed to them, as a good commercial name, suggesting the trumps and harps mentioned in the Bible."[9][/quote]

I'm willing to take credit.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 13, 2012 09:58PM)
It is a Jew Harp and I doubt anyone here is thinking "why, when I ws a youngun in 1843 23 we called it jaw harp" . For those of you freaking out the term looked up for that wikipedia description is Jews Harp.

Now 'splain this elecacoustic guitar to me.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 13, 2012 10:42PM)
I always thought it was "juice harp." That's what the guy who owned the drum store called them. Doesn't matter to me though, that's just what I thought they were called.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 13, 2012 10:49PM)
That is another idea along with others. The common term is jews harp and as the new Moses I am tired of the pcaholics. Now what about the dan jewtar question.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 14, 2012 01:37AM)
Actually, the term "jaw harp" is older than "jews harp." And yes, critter, in some parts of the country it is also called a "juice harp."

Jaw harp always made the most sense to me because you hold the thing against your front teeth and it resonates in your jaw. As far as I know it doesn't cause Jewish bystanders to resonate. :eek:
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 14, 2012 12:26PM)
Andy Griffith called it a Jow Harp. (Rhymes with "out" not "toe")

And yes Steve, today's the day. Woody @ 100!

I did learn to play harp by listening to Dylan and Neil Young records (8-tracks too). Unfortunately, I learned to sing with the Dylan records.

A little Dylan history: When he was young and learning to play and sing, he generally annoyed his parents. They lived on a farm and his dad told him to outside, as far from the house as possible, to practice. While he was playing and singing, he often leaned against a tree. It was tent-caterpillar season and they were falling from their nest onto poor old Bob, who was constantly crying out, "Eww, bug, eww!" And the voice was developed. ;)
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 14, 2012 10:13PM)
Two things. I thouught Bob 'that is right I am a Jew' Dylan developed his sound based on Woodie Guthrie (happy birthday the Woodster)

Second I really want an answer about the acoustic electric guitar.


Bonus: I love you Widget the glass walker.....
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 14, 2012 10:54PM)
Santa,

Yeah, that Dylan story was a joke. You're right, he did admire and emulate old Woody.

The typical acoustic/electric guitar is basically an acoustic guitar with a mic or pickup installed that allows it to be plugged in to an amp. Some have mics (which produce the most natural sound), some have magnetic pickups (which sound similar to electric guitars), and some have a piezo pickup mounted under the bridge saddle. Those have to have a pre-amp to compensate for the low level and the to match the impedance of the pickup to the amp. A lot of a/e guitars have a combination of those for more versatility of sound.

I have pickup mics installed on my banjos to, as if they aren't loud enough already. :)

- B.H.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 15, 2012 12:09AM)
I have a Gibson 1923 banjo that I play as well as anything. Thank you for the guitar info, basically it is an amplified acoustic sound.

Here is another question. Is playing an ac@oustic the same method as a hard body elec, for example.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 15, 2012 12:24AM)
In the opposite direction, my big Marshall amp has an acoustic setting that sounds kind of like an acoustic. Not as resonant though.
Message: Posted by: Regan (Jul 16, 2012 08:56AM)
I sold my Marshall Stack years ago and I still miss it sometimes! I have several electric guitars, and 3 acoustic/electrics. I installed a pickup under the saddle on my 'beater' guitar, but I rarely plug it in. I have one guitar with an L.R. Baggs Duet system, which uses an under-saddle pickup coupled with a microphone. I also have a Taylor GA Custom which has the Taylor ES System. The ES system uses a pickup under the extended fretboard and also magnetic body sensor(s) which are mounted to the underside of the guitar top. The Baggs and the Taylor pickup systems both sound very natural. I love both of 'em!
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 16, 2012 11:00AM)
[quote]On 2012-07-15 01:09, MagicSanta wrote:
I have a Gibson 1923 banjo that I play as well as anything.[/quote]
Cool. 4-string or 5?
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 16, 2012 11:31AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-16 12:00, Bill Hilly wrote:
[quote]On 2012-07-15 01:09, MagicSanta wrote:
I have a Gibson 1923 banjo that I play as well as anything.[/quote]
Cool. 4-string or 5?
[/quote]

Uh...if it has 4-strings it can still be called a banjo? That's like calling a guy a "male" without him having...ah...uh...hm!...a fifth string.

:jump:
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 16, 2012 01:12PM)
Oh, that gives me an idea for a joke. Mine are 5-strings so I can't use it but if I had a four string I could say it wasn't a banjo but a banjane because of that.
Message: Posted by: Slide (Jul 16, 2012 01:56PM)
"Uh...if it has 4-strings it can still be called a banjo"

4 string banjos are much more common than 5 string banjos and have been used in early jazz since the 1920's. 4 strings is definitely a banjo. It wasn't until the popularity of Earl Scruggs and bluegrass that 5 string banjoes became ubiquitous.
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 16, 2012 02:10PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-16 14:56, Slide wrote:
"Uh...if it has 4-strings it can still be called a banjo"

4 string banjos are much more common than 5 string banjos and have been used in early jazz since the 1920's. 4 strings is definitely a banjo. It wasn't until the popularity of Earl Scruggs and bluegrass that 5 string banjoes became ubiquitous.
[/quote]

Ya ya ya, bubbledy bubbledy boo.

"Common" doesn't cut it. And you are totally wrong regarding the history of the banjo. It wasn't until the jazz era that four-string banjoes became, ah, "banjoes". From Sweeney until Jazz five strings defined what a banjo was. Otherwise, the only definition one might have is: a plucked-string instrument using a drum-head as a sound board.

Seriously, you don't wanna challenge me on banjo history, do ya? I'll WIN!

(Seriously seriously...I will. Unless you've been studying banjo history for the last decade or so.)
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 16, 2012 06:57PM)
Five string.....
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 16, 2012 07:18PM)
I took banjo lessons as a kid and it went like this every Tues:
Me; I am here!
Teacher: got a joint? I'll match ya
Me: sure.....ffffft. fft ft. Er man
Teacher; ffffftttttt
Me; hhhhaaaaaa. Fffffftttt
Teacher: uh... practice what I said
Me;huh? Yeah heehee its been two hours
Teacher; huh? Wow...next weel I will bring two joints...
Me; cool.....should I practice?
Teacher; violins suck hahahaha

Thus why I can't play anything
Message: Posted by: Slide (Jul 16, 2012 08:57PM)
"Seriously, you don't wanna challenge me on banjo history, do ya? I'll WIN! "

Oh, dude , you win. I retire.

I'd rather put a bullet through my brain than to have studied the banjo for the last 10 years. Fortunately, I've only be forced to play with one on blessedly rare occasions. :)

What is perfect pitch on a banjo? when you can toss it in the dumpster without hitting the sides.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 16, 2012 10:39PM)
I know a guitar player next town over. He is 65 so I suggested theybname yheir rock band Geezer playing off Weezer.

I told him about my banjo and he says "know the difference between a banjo and guitar!, I said I didn't know so he told me "after half an hour the audience doesn't want to beat you with a guitar"
Message: Posted by: stoneunhinged (Jul 17, 2012 12:23AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-16 21:57, Slide wrote:
What is perfect pitch on a banjo? when you can toss it in the dumpster without hitting the sides.
[/quote]

How can you tell when the stage is level? The banjo player is drooling out of both sides of his mouth.