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Topic: Old (Military) Habits Die Hard
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 21, 2012 01:42PM)
With the two discussions that took place concerning the military, I was wondering, those of you who served, is there anything you did or learned during your time of service that you still do regularly?

For instance, for me, I still roll my t-shirts, underwear and socks. My wife has me place the sheets on the bed in the guest bedroom and on our bed when she changes the bed linen, because she likes the hospital corners I make. I still check my gig line before leaving the house and, of course, I still hit my shoes - those that are leather - with polish, however; I very rarely spit shine anymore.

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 21, 2012 02:12PM)
Yeah. I always folded the laundry the Navy way, which everyone should. My shoes are spit shined and if scuffed it bothers me. I do check my gig line, yesterday in fact, and it took a lot of convincing that evey shirt should be tucked in. I also remove my cap when entering restraunts and medical buildings, which was required in the Navy.
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 21, 2012 02:27PM)
I do the hat thing too when I'm wearing one, hat on outside, hat off when inside or under cover. I also get upset when a scuff hits my shoes, especially the heel area when I'm driving. If I have something important going on, I will wear my sneakers and put on my dress shoes when I get there, just like I did on inspection days.

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jul 21, 2012 02:29PM)
Service before self still resonates but everything else was put behind me as my hair grew out. I work with the military on a daily basis but with my rings, my hair, and choice of clothing I no longer blend.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 21, 2012 02:41PM)
I accidentally shaved my head two days ago. I would grow mine longer but the sides curl and I get a Bozo thing going on.
Message: Posted by: Magical Dimensions (Jul 21, 2012 02:47PM)
I did over 20 years and STILL hang my cloths up as if it was my wall locker! LOL ...... Each hanger is facing in the same direction. If I wear a hat, it is worn as it was meant to be..... Lol

Gig line is checked through out the day. I still find myself squaring my corners as I walk. LOL


Ray
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 21, 2012 03:20PM)
Crooked caps drive me nuts. I figure if you cannot figure out how it goes on your head you shouldn't wear it. I never thought about it but clothes on hangers are facing the right direction.
Message: Posted by: mvmagic (Jul 21, 2012 03:28PM)
"Fast mornings" have stuck with me. In the morning, I wake up 25 minutes before my bus leaves (200 yards only to the busstop) and I have time to shower, get dressed and eat a bit. I need that action. Had I more time, I'd be late for sure.
Message: Posted by: Salguod Nairb (Jul 21, 2012 05:01PM)
Gig line is an ancient memory... nowadays I'm happy if I remember to zip my pants up.
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Jul 21, 2012 05:17PM)
Oh, man, do I ever...

Gig line checked every day (and after I go to the bathroom). Hangers, shirts, and pants all facing the same way. Hat (baseball cap) goes on and off right at the doorway. I was making up the bed per regs until just a few years ago - now it's just hospital corners (we have a thick mattress). Probably a few more things I'm not even aware of.

Glad I'm not the only one. :)
Message: Posted by: Dr. Van Van Mojo (Jul 21, 2012 05:54PM)
I've never served, but my Dad retired from the military. I used to think maybe I had a touch of OCD. I came to realize most of it is just habits I picked up from my Dad over the years, which were things that stuck with him from being in the military. I do all that stuff, sheets, hat, gig line, hangers, and generally being neat and everything having a place. My brother (also retired military) and I are both that way. My four sisters obviously didn't pick up any of Dad's habits and my Mom is kind of in between. Go figure.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 21, 2012 06:10PM)
The way some of the lifers treated their kids you might as well been in the military.
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 08:36AM)
Yeah there are quite a few habits I maintained. The cloths closets look they they are ready for a wall locker inspection with the hangers and all the clothes going the same way. I make my rack every morning as soon as I get up. (I just called my bed a "rack"). I do have two pairs of spit shines ready to go for dress occasions. I polish my regular shoes. I polish and shine all brass and "brightwork". I clip, or burn, all the "irish pennants" off of my clothing. If I'm getting dressed up I put my shoes and socks on first, then my pants at the last minute to preserve the crease in my trousers. I 'blouse' my shirts in the back before I tuck them in. Probably 100 little things that I do, or say, everyday. Usually becuase they work, or make life easier.
Message: Posted by: LobowolfXXX (Jul 23, 2012 10:12AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-21 16:20, MagicSanta wrote:
Crooked caps drive me nuts. I figure if you cannot figure out how it goes on your head you shouldn't wear it. I never thought about it but clothes on hangers are facing the right direction.
[/quote]

I realize it's purely an aesthetic thing, but IMO, very few things make someone look more moronic than caps worn at a deliberately oblique angle.
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 10:35AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 11:12, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I realize it's purely an aesthetic thing, but IMO, very few things make someone look more moronic than caps worn at a deliberately oblique angle.
[/quote]

Particularly a baseball hat. And I can't stand those flat bills on a cap. But I guess that's the fashion these days.

Speaking of looking moronic in a hat, this is right up as well. "Boy If only I had something to keep this darn sun out of my eyes I wouldn't have to hold my hand up like this!"

[img]http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/9706/hatem.png[/img]
Message: Posted by: ClintonMagus (Jul 23, 2012 10:47AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 11:12, LobowolfXXX wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-07-21 16:20, MagicSanta wrote:
Crooked caps drive me nuts. I figure if you cannot figure out how it goes on your head you shouldn't wear it. I never thought about it but clothes on hangers are facing the right direction.
[/quote]

I realize it's purely an aesthetic thing, but IMO, very few things make someone look more moronic than caps worn at a deliberately oblique angle.
[/quote]

Except maybe for pants that were deliberately bought with too big a waist... :P
Message: Posted by: kid iowa (Jul 23, 2012 11:17AM)
Gig line checked before leaving the house
Irish pendants cut off in the morning
Can't stand clutter, everything has to be put away precisely or I get OCD
have a high and tight (actually buzz it "no guard")
have to do some form of exercise at least 4 days a week
have to bust on anyone not in/from the Navy (just in jest, and since I work at a VA hospital I can meet my quota by 0730 every day)
all Marines I meet get a series of questions about Chesty Puller's "preferences", then I remind them that technical the USMC falls under the Dept of the Navy
Clothes are rolled instead of folded
I still use the terms deck, bulkhead, working party, mess hall and head (my favorite) daily out of force of habit, the non military people I work with are confused on a daily basis. and putting in work requests for buckets of steam is always fun
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 11:21AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 12:17, kid iowa wrote:
then I remind them that technical the USMC falls under the Dept of the Navy
[/quote]

Yes. The Mens Dept. :)
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 11:39AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 12:17, kid iowa wrote:
I still use the terms deck, bulkhead, working party, mess hall and head (my favorite) daily out of force of habit, [/quote]

I like those. I also use field day, cover, chow, field glasses, gang way, scuttlebutt, and "as you were". On a regular basis. As well as a few politically incorrect ones that I dare not post here. We probably don't even realize all the words that have worked their way in to our daily use.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 23, 2012 12:11PM)
The galley.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 23, 2012 12:56PM)
Kid, my favorite thing to tell non Navy is "it's okay, not everyone can pass the test to gt in".

When did the navy start rolling clothing? We folded everything bit socks. The jarheadss had their own problems with 'crap on the rack'

Worse than a backward hat is that way they barely put it on their head with the bill pointing at some odd angle. Maelin that mens dept was a good line.
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 01:10PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 13:56, MagicSanta wrote:
When did the navy start rolling clothing? We folded everything bit socks. The jarheadss had their own problems with 'crap on the rack'

[/quote]

We pretty much folded everything too as I recall. Maybe Kid was talking about when he packed for the field? I think he was a Corpman (or as the Commander in Chief calls it, a "Corpse Man").

Oh yes, those stupid crap on the rack/junk on the bunk inspections. Those we a pain in the butt. The wall lockers ones were easier. We would set up a perfect locker then buy dupilcates of almost everything in there. We used the everyday stuff all the time and only opened the wall locker once a week for inspection.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 23, 2012 01:59PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 11:35, Marlin1894 wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 11:12, LobowolfXXX wrote:
I realize it's purely an aesthetic thing, but IMO, very few things make someone look more moronic than caps worn at a deliberately oblique angle.
[/quote]

Particularly a baseball hat. And I can't stand those flat bills on a cap. But I guess that's the fashion these days.

Speaking of looking moronic in a hat, this is right up as well. "Boy If only I had something to keep this darn sun out of my eyes I wouldn't have to hold my hand up like this!"

[img]http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/9706/hatem.png[/img]
[/quote]

Since he's also wearing sunglasses I can only assume that he forgot to put his hand back down at the end of the National Anthem. Odd, since he remembered to sit back down.
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 02:06PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 14:59, critter wrote:
Since he's also wearing sunglasses I can only assume that he forgot to put his hand back down at the end of the National Anthem. Odd, since he remembered to sit back down.
[/quote]

Could be! His arm may have locked up. The only thing that could have made the pic better is if his sunglasses were upside down on the back of the hat. Which is another thing that is somewhat common these days.
Message: Posted by: kid iowa (Jul 23, 2012 02:13PM)
Yup, was a Corpsman for the Marines for many years, EVERYTHING was rolled, saved tons of space that way when we went to the field. the extra room we loaded up with geedunk to sell to the Mens Department (shout out to Marlin1894!) at incredibly marked up prices.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 23, 2012 02:15PM)
Wasn't in the military, but after I stopped working in nursing homes I never wanted to make another hospital corner in my life.
Message: Posted by: Marlin1894 (Jul 23, 2012 02:19PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 15:13, kid iowa wrote:
we loaded up with geedunk to sell to the Mens Department [/quote]

Ha! Geedunk and pogey bait. I haven't heard either of those in a long time. Good one.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 23, 2012 02:57PM)
My best job was running the gedunk, did about four hours of work a day.

A lot of the grunts had a set of gear just for the crap on a rack (sea for you lubbers) or junk on a bunk. I heard they finally stopped that inspection when a commandant who was a mustang and hated it took over.
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 23, 2012 10:30PM)
I still say, at ease, as you were. I still use di di mao, riki tik, most haste for something that needs to be expitited and hoohah or airborne when something is going good or had gone great and rock steady when something needs special attention or fortitude is needed. I refer to my assistants as chogies and I still use the term newbie or rookie (police term). And when I am jogging, I still call cadence in my head.

In the army we also had to lay our gear on the bunks for inspection. Our Seargeant Major was only 5'5" and we had to put a chair next to the bunks so he look on the top bunk.

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 23, 2012 11:20PM)
In boot as they inspected your gear they tossed out the window. You knew you passed if your matress wasn't tossed out.

Just a check....anyone not know what a gig line is? How many know what pogie bait is used to catch, hint, the slang for them is pogie.
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 23, 2012 11:36PM)
I know what the common parlance for pogie bait is, non issued military food, usually a no-go in the field. In the Army, a poag was a remf, (Rear Echelon M.F.). I know those types always had good non-military rations with them.

Gig line, besides the common parlance, that being the line formed by the shirt buttons, belt buckle and trouser fly which was an inspection criteria during inspections, I remember watching Armed Forces Network (AFN) when I was in Germany and there were these little commercials about military trivia and stuff and one was the term gig line. I remember it being a naval term. Something about people who flunked inspection had to clean the Captain's gig (I can't remember what that was) and the group of sailors cleaning it were called the gig line.

During our training exercises, if you were killed, you had to go back to the rear and be "recycled," processed as a new soldier would be. All those who got killed had to do extra P.T. during the first week back in contonement (barracks).

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 23, 2012 11:48PM)
I meant if civilians knew!

In the Navy/Marines pogie bait is a candy bar and pogie an underage girl.
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 24, 2012 09:13AM)
LOL

I didn't know it was an underage girl to you guys. That now makes the remf assessment even better!

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: George Ledo (Jul 24, 2012 12:38PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-23 15:57, MagicSanta wrote:
A lot of the grunts had a set of gear just for the crap on a rack (sea for you lubbers) or junk on a bunk.
[/quote]
Yup. In Basic you could have opened my footlocker anytime and seen a perfectly rolled-up and arranged set of underwear and such. It was the weirdest thing, but after a while I actually felt guilty about it. What was funny was unrolling them after several weeks: they didn't want to go.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 01:24PM)
In the navy we married underage girls. My pal Harolds wife wa 13 and in was her second marriage.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 24, 2012 01:32PM)
Even though I'm now very old I still keep the gig line straight. (Although I often forget to pull up my fly.)
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 01:49PM)
I am fat, I can't see my fly.
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 24, 2012 02:56PM)
My Dad's a dirty old hippie now, but he still remembers how to pack efficiently from his military days.
Well, actually, for a hippie he's pretty clean...
He did one tour as UDT and one as a SEAL.
Message: Posted by: mastermindreader (Jul 24, 2012 03:14PM)
You realize that there are a few of us "dirty old hippies" around here, right? :eek:
Message: Posted by: critter (Jul 24, 2012 05:43PM)
I reckon ;)
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 24, 2012 07:12PM)
Basic training has changed a lot these days to make the soldier more combat effective in the real world and in real combat situations. Plus the PT test is harder now and more in tune with what might be required in combat. Our armed forces have become more combat hardened and smarter since all these wars kicked off.

The military itself has changed a lot since most of the forum members have been (though we do have a few Iraq and Afghan vets here but from what I know, not many) in. It seems a lot of people are unaware just how much the military has changed since these wars kicked off (which I guess it's not surprising given that according to the Iraq and Afghan Vets of America that about 1% of the American population carries the burden of national defense or something to that effect).
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 08:08PM)
Some of us are combat vets other than Iraq or Afghanistan and when I went to boot torture was still allowed. I do admit today is tougher PT, that is an assumption as I never did an obsticle course holding hands with a team mate while chanting

This is my rifle,
Peace is Islam,
This is for fighting,
The other should be respected

General, when stress cards are gone tell us how tough it is now.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 24, 2012 09:11PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-24 21:08, MagicSanta wrote:
Some of us are combat vets other than Iraq or Afghanistan and when I went to boot torture was still allowed. I do admit today is tougher PT, that is an assumption as I never did an obsticle course holding hands with a team mate while chanting

This is my rifle,
Peace is Islam,
This is for fighting,
The other should be respected

General, when stress cards are gone tell us how tough it is now.
[/quote]

I don't know anything about stress cards though I heard about them. I never had stress cards going through basic. What I will tell you is that it's a good idea to treat your troops well if you are a leader or a fellow soldier, because those are the guys who are watching your back and their is a wild west factor in a combat zone (assuming you are a combat vet you already know that). Believe me when I tell you that the armed forces are much more combat hardened than before these wars started. It inevitably happens when you start losing a lot of guys.

Basic training also isn't about blindly following orders like it used to be (discipline is important but blindly following orders is not smart either and doesn't work too well in real combat, but again, their is discpline and then blindly following orders). You have to be discplined, but you can't be a robot either and you have to be smart. You got to fight smarter. Hand to hand combat has also gotten better.

A lot of today's enemies have developed methods to circumvent superior firepower and technology, so in the end, no amount of firepower or technology is a substitute for tactical proficiency. Being tactically proficient is a big factor in whether you make it home alive or you come home in a coffin.

Some of our enemies like to flee in the face of overwhelming firepower and then double back and catch us by surprise and engage in hand to hand. That way, we can't bring our superior firepower to bear without killing our own troops. So being good at good old fashioned hand to hand, face to face and very personal combat is a must. Make em pay a price for daring to engage in hand to hand combat. I am speaking from the perspective of a light infantryman.

Ultimately, in the end, wars are decided by the man, the light infantryman. Not by machines or overwhelming firepower. I think in the past our armed forces were too machine depedent, but now I think we have become much more tactically proficient and much less machine dependent. Much better at the use of deception and surprise. Hopefully, these lessons get passed down to the new generation of soldiers and continue to be passed down, that way future generations won't have to learn the hard way (which the hard way usually means putting soldiers into a coffin to be sent back home to their family after they have been KIAed in combat). Unfortunately, a lot of lessons are learned the hard way and a lot of mistakes are put into a coffin when it comes to the profession of soldiering.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 09:31PM)
Of course they are more combat hardened. Between 1975 and 1980 it got very soft, happens after every war. In the early 80s the number of experienced junior ranked personel was pretty much nil....except for some of us. I happened to be in the right place at the right time when a war started and we were ordered to stay there. From that point on those of us who were suddenly experienced got sent to evey hot spot. Now a lot more go to hot spots while a lot more hang out as far from battle as I am now.

So do you check your *&$)*& gig line or not?
Message: Posted by: kid iowa (Jul 24, 2012 09:31PM)
I disagree that the PT tests are more difficult. While the actual skills being required in the PT tests are becoming more relevant to what the Airman, Sailor, Marine, Grunt have to do, there are WAY too many ways to get waivers to get out of them. the body fat exams are laughable, twice yearly PT tests should be done (in my opinion) at least quarterly. I've seen enough guys/girls when I was in (Desert Storm and Iraq vet here)and now just getting out, and the physicality of 80% of them is pretty sad. The only ones that take pride in PT are the grunts and the Marines, and it shows.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 24, 2012 09:35PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-24 22:31, MagicSanta wrote:
Of course they are more combat hardened. Between 1975 and 1980 it got very soft, happens after every war. In the early 80s the number of experienced junior ranked personel was pretty much nil....except for some of us. I happened to be in the right place at the right time when a war started and we were ordered to stay there. From that point on those of us who were suddenly experienced got sent to evey hot spot. Now a lot more go to hot spots while a lot more hang out as far from battle as I am now.

So do you check your *&$)*& gig line or not?
[/quote]

Yeah, I still check my gig line LOL! I miss the cameraderie and brotherhood of an infantry unit but man, I have to be honest, I don't think I ever want to go through that **** again! Combat is no fun and really sucks! It's not like the video game Call of Duty or what you see in a Hollywood movie, that's for sure. Combat is no video game or Hollywood movie. Everything you do is a matter of life and death, safety and ruin. Another thing I learned, is that some medals and awards just aren't worth it. But that's my personal perspective and for me, I am just glad to simply be alive and that's the best award I can have, just to be alive.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 10:02PM)
I know, I was I. Beirut and it was exhausting and stressfull, non stop.

Since you are our first regular infantryman tell us, did you all want female infantrywomen leading the charge next to you?
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 24, 2012 10:27PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-24 23:02, MagicSanta wrote:
I know, I was I. Beirut and it was exhausting and stressfull, non stop.

Since you are our first regular infantryman tell us, did you all want female infantrywomen leading the charge next to you?
[/quote]

Women can kill just as quick as any man. I think women in the very least can make good snipers. However, in terms of going hand to hand, face to face in combat with the enemy I am a little wary. Part of the job of the infantryman is to get up close and personal with the enemy and go hand to hand with him if necessary. Some women can kick ass if they train hard enough. I believe in equal opportunity and so long as the woman can hold her own and is a Betty bad ass in hand to hand combat, I will be willing to go to war with her. But she'll have to prove herself too.

I had one officer (she was not an infantry officer) before I made it to my infantry FOB who I think would have done well in combat, but then again, you never know how people are going to react until the **** hits the fan (some people who you are think are bad ass really don't measure up when the **** hits the fan and the **** bags that you think really are unsquared away, turn into bad ass combat troops when the **** hits the fan). You got some women who are really brave and bad ass and then you got some guys who will freak out when the **** hits the fan (and vice versa).

All in all, I think women should be allowed in infantry roles, BUT they get no special priveleges AND no special treatment. I am also wary of how women can effect unit cohesion, because you know how it can be sometimes when women and men mix together (and how drama can harm unit cohesion). On the same token, I want to give women a fair shake, but women will have to prove themselves if they are ever allowed in the infantry. That's just a fact and reality women must accept if they are ever allowed in the infantry and also want to serve in the infantry.

In the infantry it is vitally important that each infantryman views his fellow infantryman as family and is prepared to die for his fellow infantryman without second thought. Women must be held to the high standards of any guy who is infantry and if they don't measure up then they can't be infantrymen. My opinion is probably not popular with other infantrymen and most infantry will probably disagree with me. But I think if a woman can hold her own and kick ass in a real world combat situation and she wants to fight and die for her country, then she should be given a fair shake and permitted to do so. But again, I know that if women are ever allowed in the infantry, the integration is not going to be easy at all but I think it can be done over time.

But infantry are family and infantry are prepared to fight and die for one another and women must understand this aspect of the infantry. They must also be ready to fight and defeat the enemy in close up, personal, face to face, hand to hand combat. That's the reality of infantry. I know their are some women in martial arts who are bad ass, but if a woman is going to be infantry she must meet the same standards as any man and be ready to die for her fellow infantryman without second thought and also kill the enemy in up close personal combat.

I know the Vietnamese used women in combat during the Vietnam War and from what I read (and I am way too young to have ever served in Vietnam) was that enemy women soldiers/Viet Cong had a fierce reputation among US combat troops in Vietnam. I read about how Charles Hathcock shot and killed an enemy woman soldier/Viet Cong who was torturing our soldiers by breaking their fingers slowly and gradually. She was a war criminal. But women should not be under-estimated.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 10:38PM)
There, I consider the case closed. We had comments from squids, jarheads, and even guys who really were not in the military (air force). Our one army guy was a ranger but ni infantry. I like you general. You ain't one of those Ft Stewart wuzzies.
Message: Posted by: Intrepid (Jul 24, 2012 11:28PM)
Four years in the Civil Air Patrol was good enough for me. And thirty years later I still check my gig line like you guys. Good habits die hard.

Do they still use the term LPC?
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 24, 2012 11:29PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-24 23:38, MagicSanta wrote:
There, I consider the case closed. We had comments from squids, jarheads, and even guys who really were not in the military (air force). Our one army guy was a ranger but ni infantry. I like you general. You ain't one of those Ft Stewart wuzzies.
[/quote]

Well, I was never a ranger (I assume you are not referring to me when you were talking about this one army guy who was a ranger), but I was assigned to an infantry unit in Afghanistan and used as an infantryman (actually, my MOS was not 11B but 19K which is Armor Crewman). However, in Afghanistan, they didn't have any tanks and there was no need for tankers. We needed light infantrymen in Afghanistan, so they just threw me in with an infantry unit where I was used as such.

Dogs also proved very useful in combat. The Afghans treated dogs like **** and some of the dogs would come to our FOBs because we treated them better than the local Afghans. Sucide bombers were a problem getting onto some of the FOBs and blowing themselves up in our chowhalls (killing and injuring some of our troops), however, at one FOB it was a dog that detected one of the sucide bombers and barked and growled at him. He panicked and accidentally blew himself up outside the FOB without killing anybody but himself because he got scared of the dog. Man's best friend.

I just recently got a dog myself and he is part of the family. Love my dog! Dogs are awesome! The dog that saved lives that day was also brought home here to the US from Afghanistan by our fellow soldiers and he has a good home with the soldier's life he saved that day. That soldier was not part of my company, but was part of my brigade and they had him on the news when his dog that saved his life arrived from Afghanistan to the US.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 24, 2012 11:48PM)
There you go. The general thinks ugly women are good in combat and even scare the enemy.

I don't know what an LPC is.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 12:14AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 00:48, MagicSanta wrote:
There you go. The general thinks ugly women are good in combat and even scare the enemy.

I don't know what an LPC is.
[/quote]

LOL! I don't know what an LPC is either. Anyway, if you and I were serving in combat together I would jump on a gernade for you without second thought. I hope you would do the same for me! Nice talking with you Magic! I hope you are doing well these days!
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 12:50AM)
Hey brother, wouldn't even be s second thought. I'd through you on the granade and put you in for a bronze star and I would pet tour dog. Ibwould jump on the grenade myself but then who would write up for your medal. The dog, I would name him Splat after you, would even present the medal to youbfamily.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 01:04AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 01:50, MagicSanta wrote:
Hey brother, wouldn't even be s second thought. I'd through you on the granade and put you in for a bronze star and I would pet tour dog. Ibwould jump on the grenade myself but then who would write up for your medal. The dog, I would name him Splat after you, would even present the medal to youbfamily.
[/quote]

WOW! You sure you been in combat? Do you always treat veterans or your fellow soldiers like this? In my unit, we became real brothers and were ready to lay our lives down for each other. Sufferring brought us together. If you ain't ready to jump on a gernade for your fellow soldiers, don't get on that plane. There were times I could have been killed at any time, but my buddies depended on me to do my part and they were willing to do the same for me. You sound like a civilian or somebody who served in the military but never served in combat, or at least, not for a length of time. You should know that soldiers always fight for each other first in combat.

Are you American? Or from a foreign country? I thought you were American. I am trying to figure out if you are American or the enemy here. I think I misjudged you. You don't sound like any of my fellow vets. Your best bet to get home alive in combat is your willingness to die for your brothers. My buddies died so that others may live but they didn't die for folks like you. When you take that oath, if you ain't prepared to die for your country, then you don't have any business wearing the uniform. That's part of the deal when you take the oath. You took an oath. You solemnly swore.

Listening to you talk like that, I would advise you not to get on the plane into the wild west territory of combat. If you ain't ready to fight and possibly die for your fellow soldiers and risk your life for them, don't get on that plane. You'll just get yourself and other people into a mess. When you take that oath, you might required to die. That's just the reality. Afghanistan isn't Bieruit. Don't put on the uniform in an infantry unit and get on a plane talking like that because it might be you that goes home in a coffin with a silver star with your fellow soldiers explaining to your family that you died heroically fighting the enemy but was unfortunately cut down by enemy fire.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 01:38AM)
Never a guarantee you going to make it home alive when you get on that plane. You become a better soldier when you accept the reality and the fact that you could die carrying out your duties. Don't matter who you are there is never a guarantee you are going to make it home alive. Soldiers always fight and die for each other first before anything else.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 02:02AM)
You have no idea what I wouldn't or wouldn't do because I hav atood my ground and neither of us has jumped on a grenade. Get a sense of humor grunt. We nevr left people behind and back the the bullets were just as real only we we're not allowedto fire back. In fact our grunts were not allowed to smoke sshould it be_hotographed.so I may toss youn and your dog on the grenade to save your pals.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 02:23AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 03:02, MagicSanta wrote:
You have no idea what I wouldn't or wouldn't do because I hav atood my ground and neither of us has jumped on a grenade. Get a sense of humor grunt. We nevr left people behind and back the the bullets were just as real only we we're not allowedto fire back. In fact our grunts were not allowed to smoke sshould it be_hotographed.so I may toss youn and your dog on the grenade to save your pals.
[/quote]

I got a sense of humor but some jokes are in bad taste. Learn to develop good taste in your humor and jokes. Thank god we never had to jump on a gernade. But there are some folks in these recent wars who have had to.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 02:33AM)
Two of wm, both got the MOH.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 02:37AM)
Well, for me Magic Santa. I remember being scared out of my wits and how the first deaths really hurt and tore me up. I was just a cherry. After a while, I became numb to it all. But the war left it's mark. I still got a big hole in my heart. Tears me up to see such good folks die. It tears a hole in my heart. Tears my heart out of my chest. Brings a tear to my eye. Really does. It hurts at times. VA has me on medication and the medicaiton helps out tremendously. However, even with the meds at times, the pain resurfaces every now and again. Hurts pretty bad to see such good lives put into coffins wrapped in an American flag. My throat gets really right and a tear comes to my eye thinking about it. That's what war stands for waste and regret. How have you been doing MS? Are things going well for you?
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 02:47AM)
I was there, it is scary cuz peoplewant tonkill you for no good reason. Kept in control using Citalopram to keep me stable and since my wife died last month I take some xnanix or whatever it iis called and ambien to try to knock me out. I am still awake!
Message: Posted by: Al Angello (Jul 25, 2012 07:03AM)
If I have to wait in line at a restaurant I will go to another restaurant, because in the navy I stood in lines every day, and I ain't going to do it again.

My wife always takes a Hollywood showers, and I often call her on it.
Message: Posted by: Intrepid (Jul 25, 2012 07:23AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 00:48, MagicSanta wrote:
I don't know what an LPC is.
[/quote]
Leather Personnel Carrier (aka your boots). If your mode of transportation was designated as LPC it meant you were walking.
Message: Posted by: Bill Hilly (Jul 25, 2012 07:29AM)
And here I thought checking my gig line was just one of my many OCDs. Ain't the Captian's gig his small "going ashore" craft?

My entire military experience is JROTC in high school in 1972 (They used actual field training films and I kept passing out seeing the carnage), and a failed inlistment in the Air Force and Navy in 1982. Back then they gave us three jobs to choose from based on the aptitude tests. After waiting 18 months in each case and no job opening, they released me. I went into engineering as a civilian, go married, and all that worked out o.k. But I still have a lot of those JROTC habits.

My dad, step-dad (both WW2 Army), a couple of uncles, latest girlfriend (18 1/2 Navy), her dad (24 Navy) and her brother (20 Navy) are all vets.




THANK YOU ALL FOR YOUR SERVICE!

- B.H.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 08:41AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 03:47, MagicSanta wrote:
I was there, it is scary cuz peoplewant tonkill you for no good reason. Kept in control using Citalopram to keep me stable and since my wife died last month I take some xnanix or whatever it iis called and ambien to try to knock me out. I am still awake!
[/quote]

That's what the VA has me taking Citalopram. It does a good job. Sorry to hear about your wife passing away. I had a melt down last night after talking with you. I guess just thinking about the war and those who died just got to me. I'm OK though. Well, thank you for your service and again, my condolences over the loss of your wife.
Message: Posted by: rowdymagi5 (Jul 25, 2012 12:07PM)
Boot laces, left over right.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 12:12PM)
Thank you general. If I don't take my meds I start wondering why some people exist.

Dang, I still take navy showers. There is a lot I never thought of like the laces. Itt is just the way it works.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 12:38PM)
I never thought about the laces either. Fact is, it's OK to get torn up over the loss of fellow soldiers. It shows we're still human. That war **** isn't a joke and can mess anybody up. I can still sleep on hard floors or the ground without a sleeping bag. Learned to sleep just about anywhere without a problem.

I enjoy talking with my fello vets on IAVA (Iraq and Afghan Veterans of America). I always feel safe when I go visit there and my fellow vets are awesome and very supportive. We are very cool and understanding and we would do anything in the world for each other. Do you have any place that you go talk with your fellow vets? I am very thankful for my fellow vets on IAVA. In a world that is not understanding of combat vets, I know I can always go there for refuge and talk with them and find understanding and a home with my fellow brothers and sisters.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 01:23PM)
Talking about the laces is very uncool. I am assuming that rowdymagic was talking about sucide. Sucide has been a problem in the military these days, so it's not a joking matter nor is it funny. That being said, there are many of us who never thought of the laces (assuming that rowdymagic is talking about sucide when he talks about the laces). Sucide is a by product of war and in some cases more combat veteran populations from specific wars die of sucide after the war than combat deaths during the war (this happenned in the aftermath of the Vietnam War). So, it's not funny to joke about stuff like that. I got a sense of humor, but some things are just simply in poor taste and just way uncool. Not everybody finds those kinds of jokes funny. In the end, I guess, my generation of vets can only rely on each other when it comes to emotional support and understanding and it has probably been that way for every generation of combat vets long before my generation. It's just the way it is. I count on my fellow vets, but not too many outside of my generation of fellow vets. A few of the World War II guys are pretty cool though.
Message: Posted by: Jim Sparx (Jul 25, 2012 01:36PM)
The wife does the military corners on the sheets cause she is a nurse. I have retired Army Texas plates on my truck, also stickers for the 8th Army and 7th Infantry Division, and a Transportation Corp sticker. Frequent visitor to the local Vets hospital and supporter of the Wounded Warriors Project at Ft. Bliss. Other than that I am anti-military (slob) insofar as habits carried over from service.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 04:32PM)
I think he was talking about how laces are done. I have no idea how you got suicide out of that.

The captains gig is the captains personal small boat, which ever is assigned to him.

COOL TRIVIA; A gig is Navy slang for being in violation and in trouble. Kind of like gigging a frog or fish, you got stuck by being in trouble. If your shirt buttons, belt buckle, and fly don't line up you have failed inspection and will be punished or gigged so it is called a gig line. One of the worse punishments was to clean the captains boat, that was your gig so the boai just became known as the captains gig. If you were busted foe anything you would say "I got gigged".

I don't know if the expression is still used but it someone in civilian world was acting out of sorts you ask "what's his gig?"
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 05:36PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 17:32, MagicSanta wrote:
I think he was talking about how laces are done. I have no idea how you got suicide out of that.

The captains gig is the captains personal small boat, which ever is assigned to him.

COOL TRIVIA; A gig is Navy slang for being in violation and in trouble. Kind of like gigging a frog or fish, you got stuck by being in trouble. If your shirt buttons, belt buckle, and fly don't line up you have failed inspection and will be punished or gigged so it is called a gig line. One of the worse punishments was to clean the captains boat, that was your gig so the boai just became known as the captains gig. If you were busted foe anything you would say "I got gigged".

I don't know if the expression is still used but it someone in civilian world was acting out of sorts you ask "what's his gig?"
[/quote]

In basic training, I heard horror stories of people trying to use their boot laces to hang themselves or something to that effect. Never knew of it happening first hand, but I heard those kinds of horror stories of people trying to use boot laces to hang themselves. Maybe it was just an old timer BS war story. Maybe it's true. I don't know but I have never knew of it actually happenning first hand. But I have heard of some basic trainees being put on sucide watch and **** like that. I guess his timing was bad when he mentioned boot laces ha ha ha ha!

Talking with you brought back some painful memories (not that you are a bad person or anything or that you meant to bring back bad memories) and then he comes in and starts talking about boot laces and left over right and it reminded of horror stories of basic trainees who I heard had boot laces taken away from them so they couldn't use them to commit sucide (I guess some of these folks were put on sucide watch, but these are just horror stories which may or may not be true that I heard long ago when I was a basic trainee).

When I was in basic training, Drill Sergents never bothered to teach us how to tie our boots, we already knew how to tie our boots. We spent most of our time in the front leaning rest push up position, doing PT, getting yelled at, getting our bags smoked, going to the sand pit to low crawl in the sand or mud, going on road marches and out in the field or in the classroom learning how to assemble, disassemble our weapons, perform immediate action and misfire, head, space and timing and **** like that.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 07:06PM)
Proof boot camp is easier
"Lace them as you which team members, remember, we are all individuals"
We didn't wear boots by the way, we wore boondocker. There was a standard uniform and it included that the right lace goes over left. We didn't have to teach the actual tying of shoes.

Try to remember general the Navy had a wee bit different mission than the army. It took me a while to calm down after West Africa and Beirut so I am being kind. I have never heard of anyone using laces to kill themselves since there were dozens of items available to do the job so who ever was saying laces was screwing with you. In boot we had a company commander (DI) give a lesson how to properly slit our wrist. No one flipped out about it.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 25, 2012 08:54PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 20:06, MagicSanta wrote:
Proof boot camp is easier
"Lace them as you which team members, remember, we are all individuals"
We didn't wear boots by the way, we wore boondocker. There was a standard uniform and it included that the right lace goes over left. We didn't have to teach the actual tying of shoes.

Try to remember general the Navy had a wee bit different mission than the army. It took me a while to calm down after West Africa and Beirut so I am being kind. I have never heard of anyone using laces to kill themselves since there were dozens of items available to do the job so who ever was saying laces was screwing with you. In boot we had a company commander (DI) give a lesson how to properly slit our wrist. No one flipped out about it.
[/quote]

Well, I am being kind too. Were you one of the Marines in Bieruit? Or were you in the Navy? I never flipped out about what was said in basic training. The timing on posting about the shoelaces wasn't well placed and your experiences and perceptions of boot or basic training are not the same as mine. Also, keep in mind that their has been wars being waged for the past 11 years.

A lot of people have died or come back seriously wounded. While most of the country is at home worried about the economy and jobs, a few of us have been deployed, at war, trying to stay alive and get back home to our families in one piece(if we have a family left to come back home to by the end of the deployment AND if we are fortunate enough to survive the deployment).
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 25, 2012 09:42PM)
I didn't bring up laces.

I was navy but worked alongside marines and other folks. There are a number of people deployed, we have retired army officers and so forth they just don't know about this thread and often don't come to this section.

I realize you feel alone since in the last decade just over 2,000,000 Americans have been deployed, add that to the other twenty million vets alive and there are a pack of us. To be honest to me you are no more important or impressive than all the rest. Not that what you did wasn't important but infantry is whan infantry is and otthers where what they were. I don't discuss what I saw and you know they don't give those pills to people without something that caused it.

Remember, you are here to talk about shoelace rumors. We have a member who's son was a marine killed in Iraq. Be thankful for what you have and guess what, in 30 years you will still by hyper aware of your surroundings like I am and like vets from ww2, Korea, Nam, and the middle east. Also remember the peace time guys because they stood on the walls and were just as deserving as any vet.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 26, 2012 09:26AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-25 22:42, MagicSanta wrote:
I didn't bring up laces.

I was navy but worked alongside marines and other folks. There are a number of people deployed, we have retired army officers and so forth they just don't know about this thread and often don't come to this section.

I realize you feel alone since in the last decade just over 2,000,000 Americans have been deployed, add that to the other twenty million vets alive and there are a pack of us. To be honest to me you are no more important or impressive than all the rest. Not that what you did wasn't important but infantry is whan infantry is and otthers where what they were. I don't discuss what I saw and you know they don't give those pills to people without something that caused it.

Remember, you are here to talk about shoelace rumors. We have a member who's son was a marine killed in Iraq. Be thankful for what you have and guess what, in 30 years you will still by hyper aware of your surroundings like I am and like vets from ww2, Korea, Nam, and the middle east. Also remember the peace time guys because they stood on the walls and were just as deserving as any vet.
[/quote]

I know you didn't bring up the shoelaces and it's petty to get upset over now that I understand what was really being talked about. Honestly, I don't feel alone. I have great support at the IAVA. We lost several guys in my company while on deployment and it hurts fellow soldiers when we lose comrades. I am sorry to hear about the loss of the marine who was killed in Iraq. It hurts to lose fellow comrades in combat but it especially hurts more to lose a family member.

However, I am not here to impress anybody. But I am very proud of my military service though I also paid a price (as I am sure you did as well). I don't have to explain myself to anybody nor do I feel a need to be better than anybody else or to impress anybody, but I am tremendously proud for serving and having the courage to deploy when many Americans didn't want to get on that plane. There is nothing wrong with being proud to have served during a time of war. It takes a lot of courage to get on that plane and go into a death trap like Afghanistan (it has a well deserved reputation through history).

A lot of people don't have the courage to get on that plane during a time of war and just stay away from the recruiters office. But you are right, I am not special at all. I can think of one guy who went on at least 12 combat tours with his first starting in 2001 to Afghanistan and I think his actual number of combat tours might have been 14 (and I assume he deployed to both Iraq and Afghanistan) before he was finally KIAed by an IED in Afghanistan about a year ago. His superiors described him as irreplaceable and he was. He was one of the finest Americans this country has known. It hurts the whole country to lose somebody like him. So, nope, I am not special at all.

But I did have the courage to get on the plane during a time of war when many Americans stayed away from the recruiters office. It's much easier to join during peacetime than during a time of war when Americans are returning home in coffins. Not that I look down on those who served during peacetime because I don't. But let's face it and let's be honest: people think twice about joining the military when we are at war and people are getting killed.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 26, 2012 11:20AM)
I agree completely. I admire the young people who go today. Too many cowards for no reason. When they took hostages in Iran the recruiters couldn't process fast enough. Now kids say "uh, I don't like being told what to do". The recruits today are the cream of a pretty ****ty crop.

Think about ww2. Those guys lost as many people in a couple days as were lost duering the last decade. The Marines would hit some island and have to fight and kill 20,000 Japanese ti finish the battle. There is an old guy here in town whon was part of the death march in the Philippines. Try to imagine his 4 years in a prison camp. My dad worked with an English guy who gut his bombers shot down three times and spent a year as a POW.

General, you really need some help because as a guy who has PTSD myself and would get angry over some things and break down over stupid stuff I can see you need it. You see insults where none are and react badly. Get the VA to get couciling going .
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 26, 2012 11:44AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-26 12:20, MagicSanta wrote:
I agree completely. I admire the young people who go today. Too many cowards for no reason. When they took hostages in Iran the recruiters couldn't process fast enough. Now kids say "uh, I don't like being told what to do". The recruits today are the cream of a pretty ****ty crop.

Think about ww2. Those guys lost as many people in a couple days as were lost duering the last decade. The Marines would hit some island and have to fight and kill 20,000 Japanese ti finish the battle. There is an old guy here in town whon was part of the death march in the Philippines. Try to imagine his 4 years in a prison camp. My dad worked with an English guy who gut his bombers shot down three times and spent a year as a POW.

General, you really need some help because as a guy who has PTSD myself and would get angry over some things and break down over stupid stuff I can see you need it. You see insults where none are and react badly. Get the VA to get couciling going .
[/quote]

Ohh yes, the old timers had it pretty rough. I had the opportunity to talk to some of the World War II guys at the VFW. Love and admire the World War II guys. There is always somebody who did more or had it rougher. I don't just think of the World War II guys but I often think of those who served in Vietnam who had to engage in counter-insurgency and I read a lot about the Vietnam War to try to learn some of the lessons from that war (they didn't know who the enemy was either in Vietnam in a lot of cases).

I am a big reader so, I bought books written by Vietnam Veterans to learn as much as I could from them, that way I had a better chance of getting back home alive. I learned ALOT from the book written by the Nam folks and surprisingly, some of the books I read, they seemed very famaliar with today's enemies. One book written by a Nam vet also got me interested and reading the "Art of War" by Sun Tzu, which in my view is a great book and has valuable wisdom. I enjoyed being a soldier. It was very tough though.

Infantry is a rough life (though I was not officially infantry on paper, I pretty much was infantry in reality given how I was used). To be infantry as a career takes a special person. I am not that special person. I like being a magician and entertaining folks (and I entertained some of my fellow soldiers on deployment to help keep our sanity and moral up). I wanted to do my time in the aftermath of the attacks on 9/11. 9/11 was a direct and personal attack on every American and that required that I volunteer to go and do my part. I generally don't sign up for just any war, but when the homeland comes under attack, I am going to fight and do my part.

Don't think I don't admire the old timers because I do. A lot of their wisdom and lessons learned that I read from books the old timers have written is why I am alive today. So I owe a debt of gratitude to the old timers. Their wisdom helped to keep me alive on deployment. Besides a magic book, I am reading a book written by a World War II vet from the Band of Brothers and he talks about PTSD and how to tackle it. The VA has been a great help. I can't complain at all about the VA. I don't mean to come off as rude, but I also try to be genuine and honest and sometimes I might mispercieve things based on my own experiences (such as my experiences from basic training for example).

I also want to help rebuild the economy, which is one out of many reasons why I started my own company. Counselling can only do so much as well. When you have served in a time of war, you bear the scars for the nation that will remain for the rest of your life. Counselling isn't going to always erase those scars. But I am sure it gets better with time, but they will always be there. But, I know I am not alone. My fellow vets are awesome and great and are very supportive. It was great meeting you MagicSanta. Do you perform anywhere as a magician? Or is magic a hobby for you? What is your favorite magic trick?
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 26, 2012 12:52PM)
I use to perform but live way out in the wild now.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 26, 2012 04:16PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-26 13:52, MagicSanta wrote:
I use to perform but live way out in the wild now.
[/quote]

Sounds cool actually. I enjoy camping and the wild. My wife and I are saving up to buy a new RV and good Chevy 3500 Duramax to tow it. We don't have any children of our own, so I think full time RVing will be a lot of fun. One of the things you do with an RV is find a good spot in the wild and boondock for a bit. Maybe even have a power generator with some feul in it to power it after the propane in the RV itself runs out. I definately would love to do some hiking as well in some beautiful mountaineous trails. The great thing about full time RVing is the freedom and flexibility you have and if you choose a good RV park, it's also cheap living and you can save a lot of money.

My new dog that I got is also getting me back into shape. He is keeping me on a good walking schedule. So it's good to get back into a regular exercise regiment and have to stick with it. My dog is a very active breed and requires constant exercise and walking. Do you do much fishing or hiking?
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 26, 2012 05:45PM)
You can get property cheap as heck but mines and warehouse jobs are about it but ten acres with a home for 20 grand or less and new houses for $150k or less. We have wild horses, a lake a mile away, river, hunting if that is your thing, and a veteran friendly population. I am planning on leaving because my wifes death has effected me badly and I am losing it mentally I think. Other than commitments to seniors and helping the people apply for food stamps etc I have been in seclusion. I am a bit off at the moment because I just got off the phone about mt wifes grave marker and it has me upset.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 26, 2012 08:16PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-26 18:45, MagicSanta wrote:
You can get property cheap as heck but mines and warehouse jobs are about it but ten acres with a home for 20 grand or less and new houses for $150k or less. We have wild horses, a lake a mile away, river, hunting if that is your thing, and a veteran friendly population. I am planning on leaving because my wifes death has effected me badly and I am losing it mentally I think. Other than commitments to seniors and helping the people apply for food stamps etc I have been in seclusion. I am a bit off at the moment because I just got off the phone about mt wifes grave marker and it has me upset.
[/quote]

Here is my number: (478) 213-3991. Name is William Davenport. Call me anytime when you need to talk. Vets don't leave vets behind. We help each other out and I got your back. Just call anytime you need somebody to talk to. Like I said, I would jump on a gernade for you. That's how it is in the infantry after being in combat for awhile. We fight for each other first. The best way to get home alive is to look out for one another. I am looking out for you and you are not alone my fellow vet.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 26, 2012 08:27PM)
Thank you
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 26, 2012 10:49PM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-26 21:27, MagicSanta wrote:
Thank you
[/quote]

Anytime. I am serious about my offer. Just call anytime you need somebody to talk to. I would also get yourself a dog. A German Shepherd is a good choice in my opinion. German Shepherds are the third most intelligent dogs, one of the easiest to train in obdience and to train in general. Plus, so long as they are socialized properly and treated well by their owners, they are great around people AND they make good watch dogs for your house and property. They are very protective and loyal to you, especially if you raise them up yourself starting when they are a puppy. Dogs are awesome and give back to you in many ways. Try to also get back into performing magic. This will help you.

It helped me a lot when I returned home from Afghanistan. It was a very tough process (and sometimes still is), but performing magic helped me out a lot, kept me going and helps to heal. It just does something for you when you watch people light up with amazement with a magic trick and you get a chance to talk with people.

It got me out of my cacoon. It's pretty common for some combat vets to go into a cacoon when they get back and not get out much. I went into a cacoon and was afraid to socialize with civilians, but magic helped me get out more and to heal and be able to talk to people more (especially civilians). The art of magic bridges a lot of gaps.

So, get back into performing and get a good dog. But you will have to put work into the dog and pay vetinarian bills and maybe drop him off at a pet care place when you have to go somewhere on a long trip or something but dogs do give back to you and help you to be happier. You also get out of a dog what you put into a dog, just like a business. You get out of a business what you put into a business. A dog helped to save the life of one of the soldiers in my brigade from a sucide bomber. I also saw on an Animal Planet TV show where one of the vets who served in Iraq brought a dog back from that place.

PS- One last, thing, quick edit here. The VA offers service dogs to some disabled vets. I know some of my fellow vets have service dogs that they got through the VA (I think some of the vets who got them were diagnosed with PTSD and got a service dog, but don't quote me on that as I am not 100% sure, but I can find out). I believe these dogs already come very well trained. Given that you are a disabled vet, you might qualify for a service dog. If you need me to get you some more information, I will be glad to do that for you.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 27, 2012 12:19AM)
If not for my dogs I would go nuts. I was down before because I didn't realize the date. My wife died one month ago almost to the minute. Now I am a bummer.
Message: Posted by: Devious (Jul 27, 2012 12:43AM)
It's very good to see you posting around here again Mr. Davenport.
We sure did toss back those pm's back and forth a while back eh?

Thank you for your service once again Brother!
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 27, 2012 06:06AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-27 01:43, Devious wrote:
It's very good to see you posting around here again Mr. Davenport.
We sure did toss back those pm's back and forth a while back eh?

Thank you for your service once again Brother!
[/quote]

Thank you Devious! Yes we did! Thank you for your service as well! I love your website. You have an awesome blog and website! How have you been doing?
Message: Posted by: rowdymagi5 (Jul 27, 2012 07:20AM)
I brought up the boot laces and I was talking about literally combat boots and lacing them up. We were taught it is left over right. There is no other way, it had to be left over right and they were checked! To this day, that is how I do any laces whether it be work boots or tennis shoes.

I had no idea there was any correlation to my statement and suicide. That is not something I would joke about.

Just wanted to set the record straight.
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 27, 2012 07:55AM)
[quote]
On 2012-07-27 08:20, rowdymagi5 wrote:
I brought up the boot laces and I was talking about literally combat boots and lacing them up. We were taught it is left over right. There is no other way, it had to be left over right and they were checked! To this day, that is how I do any laces whether it be work boots or tennis shoes.

I had no idea there was any correlation to my statement and suicide. That is not something I would joke about.

Just wanted to set the record straight.
[/quote]

It's OK, I understand. I personally don't remember being taught by the drill sergents how to lace boots, though they would at times use some guys who had ROTC experience to help teach some of the basics. To me, it just seems like common sense on how to lace and tie your boots. It's like giving a class on common sense (but then again the military has been known to do that because a lot of things seem to go against common sense in the military, especially in garrison when you are not out in the field). I guess that's why they say the inspection ready unit never passes combat and the combat ready unit never passes inspection under Murphy's Laws of Combat.

Kinda like teaching a grown man how to tie his shoes (or in most cases people in basic training are young, probably between the ages of 18-25, sometimes much older, but still should know how to tie their shoes). You shouldn't have to teach a grown man how to his shoes! Why would you need to teach a grown man how to tie his boots? It's just common sense!

I went to basic at Fort Knox, KY, which, at the time was where armor crewmen were trained on the M1 Abrams tanks (I hear it's Fort Benning now, plus tanker boots were a big thing back then, which, they don't have boot laces, but we were initially issued combat boots with boot laces and not tanker boots and tanker boots were something you had to buy on your own out of your own pocket after you graduated your training). Marine tankers were trained there at Fort Knox at the time as well. We had hills called Pain, Agony and Misery which we would road march on at the time.

No, I am not sucidal or anything crazy like that. So, I want to set the record straight as well. I just heard some horror stories of when I was in basic of some basic trainees or people in the military being sucidal and having their boot laces taken from them and being put on sucide watch.
Message: Posted by: rowdymagi5 (Jul 27, 2012 08:34AM)
Here is what we were taught, there are two ways to do things, there is the civilian way and there is the Marine way. I know a lot has changed since I was in, but back then, they broke you down and built you back up. We were taught how to shower, how to shave, how to walk, how to talk, you get the picture. Everything was to be perfect.

Ahhh, those were the days!
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 27, 2012 01:51PM)
Poor Marines. When I got to San Diego there was a dozen of us squid larva with one fellow telling us loudly what horrible subhumans we were, this was in the airport with real humans walking around watching us. There was one kid on the plane with us heading to Marine boot. He stood by himself as four drill sgts boxed him in and from six inches away informed him at top volume how happy he would be in boot camp.

A civilian walked by and yelled to us "you'll be sooorrrrrry"
Message: Posted by: General_Magician (Jul 28, 2012 03:01PM)
Here is a great article from military.com about war dogs: http://www.military.com/daily-news/2012/07/28/military-dog-up-for-hero-award.html?comp=7000023435700&rank=1 Heck, by reading the article, it would seem that even war dogs come down with PTSD.
Message: Posted by: Dreadnought (Jul 29, 2012 11:15PM)
Don't mean to beat a dead horse, but the boot lace thing is left over right for both boots in basic and for main-stream personnel, it's for uniformity sake. But it is really left over right on the left foot and right over left on the right foot as that provides more ankle support for the outside ankles as most ankle injuries (military) are from twisting the ankle to the outside especially when carrying heavy loads.

Peace and Godspeed.
Message: Posted by: MagicSanta (Jul 29, 2012 11:49PM)
Thank you, makes sense.