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Topic: Adjuncts to Mem-Deck Work
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Aug 15, 2012 12:09PM)
There has been much written on the Café already about this, but I'd like to see it collected into a single thread for the convenience of those of us that work with mem-decks.
There are two different kinds of Adjuncts: Sleights and physical props (gimmicks.) For example, I love Eric Richardson's "Southside Johnny" story effect done with the Aronson Stack. Here are the adjuncts I use or have used with it:
1. Second Deal. You may know that there is a little problem in the card order when you are doing the three black jack deals. The 10H and 4S are reversed in terms of the order that they are used in the story. You could exchange their positions before you perform the routine but if you can manage a second deal then everything will come out right. I must confess that I don't do a great second deal, but as I'm speaking I make a gesture with my right hand to draw attention away, and I also necktie the deck upwards as I do the second to make it hard to see.
2. False shuffle. I think it's almost mandatory to know and use at least one false shuffle in conjunction with memorized deck work. I use two: the good ole reliable Haymow, and the Heinstein. Bill Malone uses the Zarrow shuffle and it's a great false shuffle. Sometimes when I'm strolling, there is no table and the Heinstein can be done in the hands.
3. Deck Switch. I think you can structure a powerful set of card magic if you have a good deck switch in your repertoire. There are just oodles of these in print, so pick out a couple to use in your work. Here's a strategy which I use: Have two decks in your pockets, both set up in your favorite Mem-deck stack. Take out one of them, false shuffle, and do one or two mem-deck effects. Then do an effect in which one or more spectators shuffle the cards. Now you can do as many standard effects you like which don't require a stack. Finally, use your deck switch and end with one of the real killers dependent on a mem-deck.
4. Force. There are many great effects to reveal a specific card in your mem-deck. But that card has to be selected. If you're jazzin, you can just wait and hope that one of these cards gets named, or you can force one of these advantagous cards. Again, there are tons of good forces in the literature. Pick out three or four and master them.
5. Marked Deck. It almost seems unfair to combine two such powerful tools as a mem-deck and a marked Deck. But why not? With a marked deck, you don't have to glimpse the bottom card to know where you're at in your stack. Here's one simple example: to do Simon's Aces Awry you need to get the Ace of Hearts into a position where you can force it. (For my handling, I need it on top of the deck.) You can do an estimated cut to the 22nd position. (The location of the AH in the Aronson stack.) You might just hit it dead on, but often you will be a card or two or even more off. You have to glimpse the bottom card after your cut and then make an adjustment. But with a marked deck you know right where you're at after the cut without a glimpse. I've killed a lot of brother magicians with my "skill" at getting around in the Aronson Stack. One of my secrets has been that I use a marked deck and a Haymow shuffle. During the shuffle it's natural to look at the cards from time to time and I can read a mark and know right where I'm at. If you develop the ability to rapidly count the cards in groups as you do the Haymow, it's even easier. When you are learning a story effect, being able to read the next card from the back will help you to learn the story.

So, I hope that the mem-deck workers on the Café will jump in and list and explain the adjuncts that they use in their work. Don't hesitate to mention something I've already mentioned if you have a different use for it.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: BarryFernelius (Aug 15, 2012 12:41PM)
I'll add a few other strategies:

6. Effects that don't require a memorized deck, but leave the deck in order - if I'm doing a deck switch to enable me to use a memorized deck, I often follow the switch with an effect that doesn't require a memorized deck, as long as the effect leaves the order intact. (Sometimes I'll have to 'fix' one or two cards in the stack.) If someone later suspects that the deck was prearranged, this makes it difficult for them to back track.

7. The partial stack - there are a bunch of fine effects that use a portion of a memorized stack, rather than the whole deck. This allows me to leave the audience with the impression that they mixed the cards. (In fact, they have. But not all of them.)
Message: Posted by: Cain (Aug 15, 2012 01:56PM)
Good thread idea, Dennis.

8. Letting the spectator shuffle. There are at least two methods to restore the cards to pack order:
a) The spectator only mixes part of the stack. These cards are then recalled in a memory/mind-reading routine.
b) The spectator performs a riffle shuffle that's later restored by a cull. I like to break the cards into uneven piles (32 in one, 20 in the other) and have the spectator do Lennart Green's Rosetta shuffle: "this is called 'washing' the cards." I only need to cull less than half the deck, they're pretty much the same cards every time, AND they're not terribly mixed because of Green's shuffle. Later, find an excuse to run through the pack (e.g. remove mates).

9. Behr/Hartling's idea of obtaining any four-of-a-kind.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Aug 15, 2012 05:36PM)
A little more information on #8 part B can be found in Eric Mead's book, A Tangled Web. I find this takes quite a bit of concentration, but then I need to work on it some more. I can do it, but I find it difficult to talk coherently while doing so. Like everything else,practice/rehearsal always brings good dividends with this.

10. A scallop short in either the top or bottom card of your stack which makes it easy to get back to home position without having to do any glimpses. Actually, I mentioned the scallop short because that's what I use, but there are numerous physical modifications you can do to a card which makes it easy to cut it back to the top or the bottom. Crimps and breathers fall into this category as do bellies, long cards, and many other modifications you can do to a card. Mike Close used to use a scallop short in the top card of his Aronson stacked deck. He tells me that he has become so adept at estimated cutting that he doesn't feel that it's necessary to have any "work" in the deck. I'm a mere mortal, however, and I like knowing that I can get "home" quite easily at any time.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Eric Richardson (Aug 15, 2012 05:46PM)
I think this thread is great. Thanks for posting it Dennis!

Just a quick correction to Dennis's original post: "Southsude Johnny" was created by Paul Thomey. I also have two complete story deck routines for the Aronson stack and all three can be found in my book OASIS.
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Aug 15, 2012 11:05PM)
Indeed it is a great thread. Thanks Dennis.

10) I use a short corner for the card at position 52.
11) I use one or two Will De Seive key cards (usually for the Queen of Hearts).
Message: Posted by: Cain (Aug 15, 2012 11:12PM)
Good call on a cut card of some kind -- short/breather/scallop/whatever. That's something I just took for granted.

12. Glimpses

Identity = Location
If you know a card is 24 down, then you can build your estimation skills by cutting it to the top. Alternatively, you could practice false shuffles (riffle or overhand) that "cut" the deck to the approximate location of the selection.

Corollary: Location = Identity
Although it's unnecessary for laypeople, you could, for example, break a hand-to-hand spread and openly glimpse/flash a card -- "You'll pick one of these; I'll keep my head turned the whole time" -- then as you continue to spread at eye-level (or not) count down from the card you glimpsed. If you glimpsed #12 and spread 10 more, then you know they picked #22. In a memorized deck, every card is a key card.
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Aug 19, 2012 02:37AM)
Addendum to 10)
Think also of [i]combining[/i] short cards with breathers! This way you will gain access to the darkest corners of your stack....! :righton:
Message: Posted by: Llynus (Aug 19, 2012 12:12PM)
[quote]
On 2012-08-19 03:37, Nicolino wrote:
Addendum to 10)
Think also of [i]combining[/i] short cards with breathers! This way you will gain access to the darkest corners of your stack....! :righton:
[/quote]
Do you mean having a card that is both short and crimped? or multiple locator cards?

I've played with both ideas, wondered what you'd found.
Message: Posted by: Turk (Aug 19, 2012 11:00PM)
[quote]
On 2012-08-19 13:12, Llynus wrote:
[quote]
On 2012-08-19 03:37, Nicolino wrote:
Addendum to 10)
Think also of [i]combining[/i] short cards with breathers! This way you will gain access to the darkest corners of your stack....! :righton:
[/quote]
Do you mean having a card that is both short and crimped? or multiple locator cards?

I've played with both ideas, wondered what you'd found.
[/quote]

I'm wondering the same thing.

I was wondering if a card was both "shorted" (corner, scalloped, straight-edged, etc.) [b]AND[/b] "breathered"--so as to gain extra confidence for control thereof. Or were different cards given different treatment so as to more easily be able to differentiate between control cards for easier control (and use) of such control card(s)?
Message: Posted by: duanebarry (Aug 20, 2012 12:31AM)
Multiple locator cards.

If you can cut assuredly at 13, 26, 39 and 52, that's pretty powerful. You can instantly bring any card at most 7 away from top or bottom of the deck.

If you use your surefire locator and also estimate before you cut, you can instantly bring any card within 1 or 2 of the top or bottom of the deck.
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Aug 20, 2012 06:14AM)
@Turk: The latter (at least that's how I use it).
Other than a short card, the crimped one can (and very often shall) be used by the participant. So I use the short cards as 'exclusive locators for internal use' while on the other hand both me and the spectator can make use of the crimped cards. Duanebarry is getting the idea.

PS: Sorry for the extensive use of 'use' in this post. :D
Message: Posted by: BarryFernelius (Aug 20, 2012 08:46AM)
Lucky idea number 13: Stacking the deck so that the bottom card is 1 and the top card is 52. Why would you want to do this?

Let's suppose you're doing ACAAN, card 1 is on the top, and card 52 is on the bottom. The card named (Ace of Hearts) is 24, and the number named is 16. That means that you have to cut card number 24-16=8 to the bottom. But what if 33 is the number? Then, you need to move card 52-(33-24) = 43 to the bottom.

Now, let's repeat the calculation, this time with card 52 on top and card 1 on the bottom. The card named (Ace of Hearts) is 24, and the number named is 16. That means that you have to cut card number 24+16=40 to the bottom. If 33 is the number, 33+24=57. Because the resulting number is >52, you subtract 52. So, the card that you move to the bottom is 33+24-52=5.

Stacking the deck from the bottom up turns most of the calculations in the head into additions instead of subtractions. Many people do additions in their head more rapidly than they do subtractions. I believe that this is an Alan Ackerman idea.
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Aug 22, 2012 09:11PM)
14. Having all the pointer cards in the same direction.
Message: Posted by: Tamariz (Aug 26, 2012 11:46PM)
Mem deck, marked and anything else that you need. I believe that multiple methods help throw of the scent. Best of all is an enjoyable presentation and when all combined it is like...real art!
Message: Posted by: baobow (Aug 30, 2012 02:48AM)
A continuation to what Barry was suggestion, but obviously knowing card sequence 1-52, but then knowing order from the bottom also

i.e 52nd card (aronson is 9 of diamonds) is considered 1, 51st card considered 2. Got this idea from Alan Nu's ACAAN.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 1, 2012 10:16AM)
I'm really pleased with all of the ideas that have been shared in this thread. I certainly agree with Juan Tamariz about presentation. As magicians we can get caught up in methodology... but presentation is always the most important element in our shows. Try to remember that rebookings are almost totally dependent on how much fun your audience has. Remember that when hiring entertainment lay people are NOT thinking about which magician to hire. They are considering Comedians, Singers, dancers; the whole range of entertainment possibilities.

Having said that, I was very surprised at baobow's suggestion for which he credits Alain Nu. While I've studied and worked with memorized decks for many years... this is not something I had come across or thought of myself. For some effects when I needed to know how far a card was from the bottom I would subtract the stack number (from the top) from 53. While this is not particularly difficult it is slow and could lead to your thinking showing.

I'm going to start working on learning that second stack number for each card. Just one more step on the road to mem-deck mastery.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: JanForster (Sep 2, 2012 09:21AM)
I read about this before... Simon Aronson uses it also in two of his routines in "Simply Simon". Jan
Message: Posted by: baobow (Sep 3, 2012 04:40AM)
For those know the method to Wayne Fox's knockout prediction, is that by having one deck set up in mem deck order with the method of knockout applied to it ( please don't reveal the method) it now allows me to jazz ala Vernon's 'The trick that can not be explained' except I am always in complete control. The spectator can shuffle their deck to their hearts content and cut the deck, I can reveal the top card from my deck to match theirs, I can pull their card out of my pocket/wallet,card under glass, I can make it turn up face in in the middle of the pack, reveal it via a hot shot cut,spell to it, double lift and then reveal. Stronger yet, the spectator can genuinely shuffle before and after each revelation. You can even use it as a forcing deck as you always know what card they cut to without fishing etc

Knockout prediction has added a whole you set of card revelations to my card routine.
Message: Posted by: BarryFernelius (Sep 5, 2012 09:16AM)
5B. Marked deck (see number 5 in the original post) Instead of marking the identity of the card on the back, the mark can be the stack number. (Obviously, this will still work even after the deck has been thoroughly shuffled.)

15. Anything that can be linked to the stack number can also be linked to the card. (Example: The Birthday Trick in which each calendar date is mapped to a playing card in a seemingly random way.)
Message: Posted by: baobow (Sep 6, 2012 07:25PM)
This was raised in another post in Shuffled not Stirred and I think should be considered 0.1) Treat your mem deck as if it were a gaff, don't overuse it or abuse it in your set as using the principle too many times in your set will start to make the principle suggest itself.

Another one
16) Make a conscious effort to not have the 52nd card showing on the bottom all the time so that when your spectator's see or get a glimpse of the bottom card of the deck intermittently throughout your performance that its not always the 52nd card, all those great false shuffles and cuts could be de-railed by this small point.
Message: Posted by: Cohiba (Sep 6, 2012 08:48PM)
Cool thread.
17) Using a gaffed box, ala Asi Wind or Darwin Ortiz.
Message: Posted by: baobow (Sep 11, 2012 08:07PM)
Does anyone here scallop short multiple cards in the card for easy location i.e. 13th,26th, 39th, 52nd? A great idea I learnt from one of Josh Jays dvds was that for the 26th and 52nd card at the narrow end of the card and 13th and 39th at the long end of the card makes it easy to riffle. I haven't used a scallop short personally for a while I didn't like to double lift a scallop short card as it never aligned properly with the card underneath it. I ended up switching to a breather crimp instead.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 11, 2012 08:19PM)
I use a scallop short card, but only one for stack number 1. However, my friend Frank Baxter uses 4 scallops in his Aronson stack. I agree that it does make it difficult to double lift that one card. But, knowing that it's there, it's not hard to adjust.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: baobow (Sep 11, 2012 11:21PM)
We could make a dvd with all of these ideas and sell it as new age methods, new strings, no magnets ......
Message: Posted by: JanForster (Sep 12, 2012 12:39PM)
[quote]
On 2012-09-06 21:48, Cohiba wrote:
Cool thread.
17) Using a gaffed box, ala Asi Wind or Darwin Ortiz.
[/quote]
And à la Ken Krenzel and John Born. Jan
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 13, 2012 10:12AM)
I mentioned the use of false cuts in my first post but did not mention the ones that I use specifically.

One good old reliable standby is Frank Garcia's Affas-Gaffas false cut. You'll find it described on page 391 of Card College. This one is quite easy to do and you can learn it in a few days. But keep practicing so that you can do it with ease and very quickly.

I use the Up-The-Ladder cut which I learned from Daryl's Encyclopedia of Cards Sleights DVD. This is more challenging to master, but worth the effort.

I use an in-the-hands three way false cut from Aldo Colombini's Magic of Italy DVD. Alas I no longer have that DVD and have forgotten the name of the cut and who created it.

I use an optical false cut that I created when I was 15 years old. (That's 54 years ago, gang.) It's never been in print but I will probably include it in my upcoming book "A Magician Prepares."

The Affas-Gaffas and up the ladder cuts need to be done on a table. The other two are done in the hands.

There are many other false cuts available in the literature but I settled on these four and don't feel that I need any more. But that doesn't mean that you can't post your favorite false cuts in this thread. Knowing me, I'll probably work through whatever you suggest, and perhaps add them to my repertoire.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Woland (Sep 13, 2012 03:26PM)
Has anyone mentioned the False False Shuffle (Lew Brooks)?
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 13, 2012 03:51PM)
Woland,
I don't believe that anyone mentioned it before you. It can be a VERY disarming tool, but it has limitations. I don't want to give it away, but suffice it to say that it's use has to be planned in advance and you can't just go to it at any time you have a stacked deck in hand as you can with the Heinstein, The Jarrow, or the Haymow.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 13, 2012 04:03PM)
To Martin Joyal,
You mentioned (# 14) having all of the pointer cards facing in the same direction. If memory serves, there are 24 pointer cards in the deck, but I believe they will be scattered randomly throughout an Aronson stack or Mnemonica or your stack. (Possibly a little less random in your stack.)

I wonder if you might elaborate a bit on this if it's something that you use. If it's just a concept you shared, that's fine. Thanks for sharing.

It inspires me to add this: There are lots of great tricks done with a one-way deck. (See the published material of Ted Annemann.) I have created a subtle one-way deck of 52 Bicycle backed cards by putting a small mark on the back of each card. It's a very simple bit of block out work which I do with a small marking pen. This allows you to know if a card has been turned around in the stack with a deck which does not appear to be "one-way." It also could be pre-done by turning, as an example, the 4 Aces or whatever cards you wish around. I also developed a marking system for the faces of the cards. Yes, there are 24 "one-way" faces, but by using marks, you can up that to the complete deck. Either of these tools could be used in conjunction with a mem-deck, of course.

I encourage all of you mem-deck workers to occasionally go back through this thread looking for more stuff to add. That could be USES for some of these ideas. For example, while I just added the idea of a subtle one-way deck on the back or face, I have not worked out of thought of any specific uses for this. If one comes to your mind, do us all a favor and add it here.

Dennis Loomis

P.S. I'm thinking of trying to organize these thoughts to some extent. Our numbering system has kind of flown the coop, and it might be of value to publish a list, with cross references to techniques which several different contributors have chimed in on.
Message: Posted by: Jack Crafter (Sep 13, 2012 04:05PM)
Thanks for creating this thread everybody! It's made for a really interesting read and has given me some really good ideas to experiment with. I haven't been working with a stacked deck for long so it's been really interesting to see what's possible.

I've been playing around with the idea of having a single card in the center of the deck marked to make it easy to determine chosen cards from a spread deck (although if you were going to use a single marked card you may as well use a full marked deck like Barry said :) ).

Since I read about the use of short corner cards in Marlo's fingertip control I've fallen in love with the idea of them in a stacked deck. I was using them just for forces but reading what Dennis and Baobow said about using them as indicator cards has made me realise just how powerful a tool they can be. If you have a few scattered about you easily cut to any card you needed really. Definitely something I'm going to experiment with!
Message: Posted by: Woland (Sep 13, 2012 04:32PM)
Jon Thompson has some interesting ideas in his book "Stripped and Stacked." He discusses the "pointers" in the standard deck, either in that book, or in his "The Stripper Deck." The idea is to take advantage of several different kinds of information. A deck could also be marked, stripped, and stacked, and "salted" with other indicators, too.
Message: Posted by: Cain (Sep 13, 2012 07:28PM)
[quote]
On 2012-09-13 17:03, Dennis Loomis wrote:
P.S. I'm thinking of trying to organize these thoughts to some extent. Our numbering system has kind of flown the coop, and it might be of value to publish a list, with cross references to techniques which several different contributors have chimed in on.
[/quote]

Do it, Dennis! Like most threads, this one's experiencing some drift (for example, I think favorite false cuts/shuffles probably deserves its own topic). Anyway...

#XX) Estimation. This was touched upon with glimpses, but having a memorized stack allows one to work on their ability to estimate a given number of cards. Michael Close has a fun estimation-based trick called "Myopia"
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 08:27AM)
Cain,

I have started the process. The key to finding things will be the DATE. Otherwise the thread is just an un-numbered list of items in random order.

But I do want to respond to your suggestion of Estimation. Some readers may think of Estimation as only the process of looking at where a card is replaced and trying to determine how far it is from the either the top of bottom of the deck. You may be surprised to hear that in the book Revolutionary Card Technique Ed Marlo has two full chapters on Estimation. They cover pages 466 to 528 and include many different methods of accurately estimating and over a dozen different effects using estimation. Many of these effects contain methods which allow for the fact that your estimation may be off by as much as three cards.

I spent just a little time with a mem-deck in hand. It just happened that it was also a marked deck. I could see immediately how many of the Marlo estimation techniques can be simplified by using a marked, memorized deck. The estimation effects often require one or more glimpses, and the decks marks allows you to get the information you need from the back. And the fact that the deck is memorized helps you to quickly get to the vicinity that you need to be working in.


Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Sep 14, 2012 08:31AM)
Not very much longer, this wonderful thread will probably be "sticky", even more after some re-organization! :applause:
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 08:33AM)
Another couple of comments about estimation: It's not limited to Visual estimation of where the deck is cut or how many cards are in a packet. Attempting to physically cut to different positions in the deck is another form of estimation. Michael Close is uncanny in his ability to do this. Practicing with a mem-deck saves you all of that counting of the cards while practicing, and in performance if you are off, you know immediately how far away your target position is.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 10:35AM)
The Magic Café Thread: Adjuncts to Mem-Deck Use

Started on August 15, 2012 by Dennis Loomis

Aligned Pointer Cards and One-Way Decks
Martin Joyal Aug 22, 2012
DL Sept 13, 2012

Deck Switch Concept, no specifics Aug 15, 2012 DL

Effects which maintain the Stack Order
BarryFernelius Aug 15, 2012

False Cuts
DL August 15, 2012
DL Sept 13, 2012

False Shuffles
Heinstein Aug 15, 2012 DL
Zarrow Aug 15, 2012 DL
Haymow Aug 15, 2012 DL
False-False Shuffle Sept 13, 2012 Woland, Sept. 13 DL

Forces
No Specifics Aug 15, 2012 DL

Gaffed Card Boxes
Cohiba Sept 6, 2012
JanForster Sept 12, 2012

Glimpses
Cain Aug 16, 2012

Knockout Prediction Method
Baobow Sept. 3, 2012

Marked Deck No Specifics
DL Aug 15, 2012
BarryFernelius Sept 5, 2012

Partial Stacks
BarryFernelius Aug 15, 2012

Letting the Spectator Shuffle
Cain Aug 15, 2012
DL Aug 15, 2012

Linking Stack Numbers to other lists
BarryFernelius Sept 5, 2012

Locator Cards (Corner Shorts, Scallop Shorts, Short or Long Cards, Breathers, Will De Seive Card (Coin impression Card), etc.
DL Aug 15, 2012
Martin Joyal Aug 16, 2012
Nicolino Aug 19, 2012
Llynus Aug 19, 2012
Turk Aug 20, 2012
Duanebarry Aug 20, 2012
Baobow Sept 11, 2012
DL Sept 11, 2012

Not overusing a mem-deck
Baobow Sept 6, 2012

Not keeping card 52 on the bottom persistently
Baobow Sept 6, 2012

Obtaining Any Four of a kind. Attributed to “Behr/Hartling
Cain Aug 15, 2012

Presentation
Tamariz Aug 27, 2012
DL Sept 1, 2012

Reverse Stack Order
BarryFernelius Aug 20, 2012
Baobow Aug 30, 2012
DL Sept 1, 2012
JanForster Sept 2, 2012

Second Deal
DL Aug 15, 2012

Story Effects like Southside Johnny
DL Aug 15, 2012
Eric Richardson
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 10:43AM)
Above I posted the assorted topics which we have discussed to date, grouped under topic headings so that you can read all of the postings relevant to the topic. To find a post, use the date and the name of the originator. "DL" is me; Dennis Loomis

As the starter of the thread I grant myself permission to sleightly change the original charge. So, don't worry about whether or not you use a concept with a mem-deck. If you have an idea which could be helpful to others, post it. Give all the specifics you can to help others find information about your suggestion. For example I mentioned the Ed Marlo Book and the page numbers in my post about Estimation. If you use a move or concept in a particular trick, mention the trick, but if you know it, give the reference to where others can find out more about different effects. While we've covered a lot of ground, I am confident that there is much more to be said about the topic.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 10:46AM)
To Jack Crafter,
I just noticed that your post was your very first one on the Café! Welcome aboard and thanks for jumping into this thread.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Eric Richardson (Sep 14, 2012 12:11PM)
Thanks again Dennis for starting this thread.

On the topic of marking specific cards and using short cards: I have some work on this in and it can be obtained for free in the OASIS sampler available at vanishingincmagic.com. Even though the book is about the Arondon stack the work I put into the deck will work with any stack. I'm not trying to plug the book (honest!), but the sampler is free and contains some work on short cards that has been buried in the literature for a long time.

Eric
Message: Posted by: BarryFernelius (Sep 14, 2012 01:11PM)
I didn't see this earlier. I'm not sure how we missed it.

A stacked deck is what Simon Aronson calls an Open Index. In Memories are Made of This, Simon explains the idea:

"It’s almost as though you had a secret pocket index of all 52 cards that easily and efficiently delivers any desired card to your control. Only here, the secret index is out in the open; it’s the very deck you’re openly holding, and the secret memorized order provides the organizing arrangement and mechanism that allows you to quickly get to any desired target card. Because the memorized deck can thus function as an “index” that’s nevertheless out in the “open,” I’ve dubbed this concept the “open index.” "
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Sep 14, 2012 07:05PM)
To Eric,

Don't worry about plugging your book. It's a great book. I used to think of the "Big Three" of mem-deck workers/thinkers as Mike Close, Simon Aronson, and Juan Tamariz. But today it's become the "Big Four." The three aformentioned and Eric Richardson.

To Barry,
Yes, we need to make a new category for the "Open Index" concept. Thanks for mentioning. When we get a few more new concepts I'll update the list.

To All,

I'm beginning to wonder if this information shouldn't be pulled together as an article or a booklet, or something. I suspect that there are a lot of mem-deck workers out there that are not on the Café. I will not do this unless I get the permission of each of the contributors. If all of you agreed, I could post it as a new article on my website, I suppose. If you guys have any thoughts about this, let me know. I'm not gonna jump into anything.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Eric Richardson (Sep 15, 2012 01:11AM)
Thanks Dennis, completely undeserved, but appreciated! :)

Apart from Aronson, Tamariz and Close I'm a HUGE fan of Pit Hartling, Denis Behr, Eric Mead, Woody Aragon,John Born and Martin Joyal. They all have published incredible work with the memorized deck.
Message: Posted by: chappy (Sep 15, 2012 02:49AM)
Great Thread! I've read through it twice and don't think the Faro has been mentioned(specifically)> I think it needs its own category, outside of false shuffles.

So I am pleased to add the Faro shuffle.
Message: Posted by: Nicolino (Sep 15, 2012 05:33AM)
What I do whenever I investigate a stack is to look for certain not-so-obvious properties which allowed for those effects that required certain cards being in specific positions of the deck.
To give you a more concrete example: [list]
[*]Looking for two mates (or an otherwise similar pair of cards) close to each other in the stack, I remember their position. Cutting at that spot allows to perform a couple effect starting from stack order (Gemini Twins variation).
[*]Even better if two interlaced pairs are present (A-B-A-B) - think of a double coincidence matching effect...
[*]Analysing the stack sequence to find a suitable spot to divide the deck and perform Shuffle Bored.
[*]Spotting the half of the deck that contains more or less evenly distributed reds and blacks. "Mark" the reds exploiting the o**-*a* feature and perform OOTW
[*]...
[*]...
[/list]
This is just an overview to give you an idea of what I mean.
Myself, I have a similar "Swiss Army Deck" with lots of those features incorporated, leaving me never unprepared for a variety of different effects.
Message: Posted by: Jack Crafter (Sep 15, 2012 06:34AM)
Thanks for the welcome Dennis! It's nice to be here :).

With regards to the use of cut corners for forces, that comes up on page 61 of Ed Marlo's Revolutionary Card Control (although he references a manuscript called "Future Reverse"). Although some of the ideas go into controlling cards to the top it does have some great work on forces and peeking which work really well when paired with a stack. There's another method on page 63 can be used as an impromptu riffle force too (and doesn't require the use of any cut cards). As long as you can sight one card the mem stack allows you to work out all the cards around it which in turn would allow you to force a couple of different cards to different spectators (riffle up for the first, down for the second. One spectator will end up with the card below the sighted card and one with the card above it).
Message: Posted by: Martin Joyal (Sep 24, 2012 11:27AM)
To Dennis,

Suggestion #14, having all the pointer cards facing in the same direction, is not directly related to memorized deck magic. It is however the way I do work with a memorized deck. In facts, this is how I case all my decks, whether stacked or not.

In most decks, there are 22 pointer cards. In the rare occasions where a spectator ask to shuffle the deck after picking up a card, I still have room to escape (42% of chance to find back his card).

Opportunism is one of my preferred tool (but don't tell anyone).


To Eric,

Thanks for your kind words.


Martin

http://www.joyalstack.com/
Magic knowledge that last...
Message: Posted by: Ken Abbott (Oct 5, 2012 01:25PM)
I have found that, given my hand size, whenever I swing cut a packet to the left hand, I almost always cut to the 8 of clubs. I now practice this as a part of my estimation practice. Of course, your hand size may be different and another card is cut to. Also, you can start with the deck pre cut so your swing cut will cut you to another desired card.

Ken Abbott
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 5, 2012 04:57PM)
Hi Ken,

Thanks for jumping into this thread and reviving it. I tried a few practice swing cuts and found that my habit is to cut about 20 cards when I do a "normal" swing cut (or a Kick Cut as Harry Lorayne calls it.) But I'm not very consistant. I got between 18 and 23 over a series of 8 or 10 cuts.

I assume that what you are saying is that you use an Aronson Stack in home position and normally cut 16 cards which would get you to 8C. 8C in Mnemonica is way down at 33, so I doubt that your normal swing cut would take you that deep.

I think that if you can attain a very high percentage of success with this, it would be a deadly tool.

You might try to combine the swing cut with Marlo's idea of using a fingernail as a guage. I just did a series of swing cuts in which I put the fingernail of my right index finger over the left forward corner of the deck. I pretty consistantly can get exactly ten cards. At least given the length of my fingernails right now. In a series of some twenty trials, I was never off by more than a single card. And that's without any practice.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Ken Abbott (Oct 8, 2012 09:44AM)
Dennis: Yes, I swing cut to the 8 of Clubs at 16 in Aronson. I have a triple packet false cut that starts with a swing cut. I try to complete the false cut with the additional swing cut to the 8 of Clubs. I appreciate your posts on the Aronson stack. I neve cease to be amamzed by the many things built into the stack as well as the creativity of magicians to use it.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 8, 2012 10:58AM)
Ken,

Thanks for the confirmation and the compliment. I too am amazed by the stack itself and the many creative ideas that magicians have come up with to enhance the possibilities of the stack. And I find that the Magic Café is a great place for those of us working along the same lines to share our thoughts and build on each other's efforts.

This thread, in particular, contains a wealth of valuable thoughts on mem-deck work. I'll try to find the time to integrate the new suggestions following my listing on Sept 14th.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 8, 2012 12:47PM)
Back on Sept. 15 Nicolino suggested looking for "Mate" cards near each other in the stack. But he didn't get into specifics. Here they are, for the Aronson stack.

In the Aronson stack, there are three sets of mate cards which form natural sandwiches. The two red fours are at positions 29 and 31, surrounding the KH. The two red jacks are at positions 34 and 36, surrounding the 10C. And the two black queens are at positions 48 and 50, surrounding the 6D.

If you're jazzin and the KH, 10C, or the 6D is named you have a hands free miracle. For example, if the KH is named, you just state that with one snap of the fingers you will cause the the two red fours to find your card. You snap your fingers and spread to that sandwich to show that the fours surround the freely named card.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 8, 2012 01:01PM)
In his post on Sept. 15, 2012, Nicolino suggested looking for "Interlaced" pairs in the pattern of ABAB. While this situation does not exist with the Aronson stack, there is something quite close. By eliminating the JH from the five card run from positions 32 to 36, you do have two interesting sets: the 10 and J of Diamonds and Clubs. There should be an interesting effect made possible from this.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 8, 2012 01:10PM)
To go back to Nicolino's post from Sept 15, for the third time: He suggests trying to find a place to cut the cards in order to do Simon Aronson's Shuffle-Bored. This was actually done by Alain Nu and you'll find it on Simon's website. ( http://www.simonaronson.com )

I have a small addition to the effect on my Web Site ( http://www.loomismagic.com )in my Article 18.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 8, 2012 02:12PM)
Here's the updated list of topics:

The Magic Café Thread: Adjuncts to Mem-Deck Use

Started on August 15, 2012 by Dennis Loomis

Aligned Pointer Cards and One-Way Decks
Martin Joyal Aug 22, 2012
DL Sept 13, 2012

Deck Switch Concept, no specifics Aug 15, 2012 DL

Effects which maintain the Stack Order
BarryFernelius Aug 15, 2012

False Cuts
DL August 15, 2012
DL Sept 13, 2012

False Shuffles
Heinstein Aug 15, 2012 DL
Zarrow Aug 15, 2012 DL
Haymow Aug 15, 2012 DL
False-False Shuffle Sept 13, 2012 Woland, Sept. 13 DL

Forces
No Specifics Aug 15, 2012 DL

Faro Shuffle
Chappy Sept 15, 2012

Gaffed Card Boxes
Cohiba Sept 6, 2012
JanForster Sept 12, 2012

Glimpses
Cain Aug 16, 2012

Interlaced Pairs
Nicolino Sept 15, 2012
DL Oct 8, 2012

Knockout Prediction Method
Baobow Sept. 3, 2012

Marked Deck No Specifics
DL Aug 15, 2012
BarryFernelius Sept 5, 2012

Mate Cards
Nicolino Sept 15, 2012
DL Oct 8, 2012

Open Index
BarryFernalius Sept 14, 2012

Partial Stacks
BarryFernelius Aug 15, 2012

Letting the Spectator Shuffle
Cain Aug 15, 2012
DL Aug 15, 2012

Linking Stack Numbers to other lists
BarryFernelius Sept 5, 2012

Locator Cards (Corner Shorts, Scallop Shorts, Short or Long Cards, Breathers, Will De Seive Card (Coin impression Card), Pointer Cards, etc.
DL Aug 15, 2012
Martin Joyal Aug 16, 2012
Nicolino Aug 19, 2012
Llynus Aug 19, 2012
Turk Aug 20, 2012
Duanebarry Aug 20, 2012
Baobow Sept 11, 2012
DL Sept 11, 2012
Eric Richardson Sept 14 2012 and then the free Oasis Sampler
Jack Crafter Sept 15, 2012
Martin Joyal Sept 24, 2012

Not overusing a mem-deck
Baobow Sept 6, 2012

Not keeping card 52 on the bottom persistently
Baobow Sept 6, 2012

Obtaining Any Four of a kind. Attributed to “Behr/Hartling
Cain Aug 15, 2012

Presentation
Tamariz Aug 27, 2012
DL Sept 1, 2012

Reverse Stack Order
BarryFernelius Aug 20, 2012
Baobow Aug 30, 2012
DL Sept 1, 2012
JanForster Sept 2, 2012

Riffle Force
Jack Crafter Sept 15, 2012

Second Deal
DL Aug 15, 2012

Shuffle-bored with the Aronson Stack
Nicolino Sept 15, 2012
DL Oct. 8, 2012

Story Effects like Southside Johnny
DL Aug 15, 2012
Eric Richardson

Swing Cut
Ken Abbott Oct 5, 2012
DL Oct 5, 2012
Ken Abbott Oct 8, 2012
Message: Posted by: chappy (Oct 9, 2012 02:16AM)
Wouldn't it be great if all threads on the Café were as useful as this one? Just a thought. Congratulations Dennis!

On with the list... I will leave it to Dennis to decide how many principles I am adding below...

Moderators, if I am revealing too much please edit my post.

Card no. 53

The idea of using a joker or duplicate in conjunction with the MD is a simple and great concept.

When an MD is shuffled(out faro) after a card has been removed the stack order can be easily maintained(in the out faro sequence). Because a freely selected card has removed from a random place, it seems even more impossible that one could reposition every single card to a specific new position. This is easily achieved by culling a dupe/joker/xcard under the spread during the selection process and leaving it in the selections position after the selection is removed.

In each subsequent out faro, the xcard will simply fill the space of the selection. The selection can be known by a quick thumb fan and glance at the faces. The joker will stand out and the position of the cards above or below would identify the removed card. Of course this requires that you know the quick calculation for learning a cards position after each out faro....OR begin 2-3 faros from oriiginal MD order before the selection, then shuffle the appropriate number of times before spotting/glimpsing the jokers position to learn the missing card.

This principle can be applied with multiple xcards and selections.

Even better(and bolder) than the underspread cull to position the xcard, have the spectator stab 'a card' into the deck, and remove and pocket either card above or below the stabbed card. After any number of faros the xcard will be in the selections position.

Combining an xcard with basic estimation.
Using the stab method you can estimate the position and after any number of cuts, and a glimpse at the bottom card will indiacte the new region of the joker. This means it is only necessary to see a small number of cards in that region to learn the cards exact identity. This can be achieved by incorporating a simple show or procedure into your presentation where you can turn over a few cards.

Putting work into the xcard opens even more possibilities.

Subconsciously I think the removal or destruction of one or more cards from a full deck, seems to reduce the means to control the remaining cards, as it mow seems that the deck contains an unknown(or previously un-planned) quantity of cards, making any ordering system more difficult or less probable.

Card no. 53

Greg
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 9, 2012 08:40AM)
To Chappy/Greg,

Thanks for this thought. It's new to me and I think it's brilliant. Can't wait to start playing around with it.

If the x-card (a Joker seems a good choice) were a locator card such as a corner or scallop short it could be cut to the top of the deck and a glimpse of the bottom card would tell you what the selected and pocketed card is. The x-card could also be marked.

Now where did I put all of those jokers I've been removing from my decks?



Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 9, 2012 09:24AM)
To Chappy/Greg,

I owe you an apology. I missed the sentence: "Putting work into the x-card opens even more possibilities." in your post. I then made that suggestion myself. Didn't mean to steal your thunder. Sorry.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: baobow (Oct 9, 2012 10:03PM)
Hi Chappy/Greg,

It's a very interesting principle, but very counter intuitive to use a key card (the joker) to determine the card that it replaces in a mem deck? Glimpsing the card below or above the selected card when it is removed in a nonchalant way would be far less effect to doing the faro shuffles and then going through the deck to remove the joker. Using a crimp in the key card would certainly make things easier but I still think looking through the deck to pull out the joker is a weakness. No matter what you say, ppl will think that you are trying to count the cards or quickly looking through all the cards to elminate the one that is not in the pack...though this is not the method you are using, it is a logical and obvious explaination to determine the missing card.

I think it is an interesting idea for multiple cards but it wouldn't go to all that effort for deducing just one card. But thanks for bringing up this method, it is something that I haven't thought of doing before

Baobow
Message: Posted by: chappy (Oct 10, 2012 02:28AM)
Thanks Dennis, I am glad you think so too.

Thanks Baobow, I should clarify that I agree looking through the entire deck and openly removing the joker would tip a 'search' or some kind of clocking as the method. I'd never remove the joker but simply glimpse it.

Glimpsing the next card when/just after the selection is made is not a good way to go in my opinion.

Changing the moment of the glimpse from when the selection is made to after a couple of thorough shuffles is far more deceptive for the reasons I outline in my previous post. Using a thumb fan and quickly(1-2 secs)spotting the joker leaves no possibility that you could use clocking as a method. If I could clock a deck in 2 seconds THAT would be my preferred method.

The second method I outlined involves only showing a small number of cards after estimating the region. Either glimpsing or openly showing a few cards can easily be incorporated into or covered by presentation.

Greg
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 10, 2012 10:06AM)
To Baobow,

It is NOT necessary to do any faros in conjunction with Chappy's 53rd card concept. You can have the deck in regular stack order. You then use the Joker in either of the ways that he suggests to replace the selected card. After a suitable delay you can then determine the selection.

Also, you don't have to look through the deck if your 53rd card is a locator. You can cut it to the top and now all you have to do is glimpse the bottom card of the deck. The selection will be one higher in your stack. An All-around-square-up glimpse is natural following the cut of the cards and if done properly should not betray that you have seen any cards.

This could be great in conjunction with an Invisible or Brainwave deck. A Spectator removes any card from the deck and places it in his pocket without looking at it. Apparently no one knows what the card is. But you do. You remove a second deck from your pocket and explain that some hours ago you reversed a card in this deck. You spread the deck to show one card reversed. The spectator then removes his selection from his pocket and it matches. That should kill lay people and some magicians.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Oct 10, 2012 10:41AM)
I just realized that it is not necessary to have an extra card in order to use Chappy's replacement principle. For example, I have the top card of my Aronson Stack Deck (JS) scallop shorted on each of the short ends. If I get this card into underspread cull position I can have a card fairly selected and slip this card into the spot where it came from. Now I can do some false shuffles and cuts and then cut to the scallop card and bring it to the top. Then glimpse the bottom card of the deck which tells me the value of the selection.

Even easier, I can use Chappys idea of just having a spectator plunge a card into the deck. In this case I would simply hand them the scallop short card. They plunge it half way in and I spread the cards letting them take either the card above or below the card where they inserted it. I then push the projecting card home. After a suitable time delay I can cut the cards at the scallop short and glimpse the bottom card, thus learning what the selection is.

This procedure will leave you with a single card out of place in your stack. But it's a locator card, so you can easily get to it and move it back into place if you are going to do more effects.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Cain (Oct 10, 2012 01:12PM)
[quote]
On 2012-10-09 23:03, baobow wrote:
Hi Chappy/Greg,

It's a very interesting principle, but very counter intuitive to use a key card (the joker) to determine the card that it replaces in a mem deck? [/quote]

I used to do a version of Triumph (with a mem-deck) where the cards were in a face-up face-down condition and one was removed, set aside, and never peeked. The idea was that it would be impossible to control or know a mystery card removed from the deck. I gave the cards a faro. Then a card from the pack was glimpsed. I gave the deck a faro. Then a third card was glimpsed. I gave the deck a final faro. Three selections total.

"All the cards are in order." The pack was spread and all the cards were face-down except the glimpsed selections. "That's control. Process of elimination. But it's impossible to a control a card that was removed from the deck (first selection)." I spread the cards to myself and said "the Joker tells me the identity of the mystery card. (flip the joker face up, spread the deck face-down). It's the five of diamonds." Turn it over, and it's the five of diamonds. "How did I know that? Well, when I said the cards were in order, I meant that they were... *in order*." Spread the cards face up and they're all in A-K order. Where the Five of Diamonds would be in the spread between the six and the four, there would be the face-down joker (which allowed me to to the faros).

I still do a version of the trick, it's my closer, but no joker is used. Funny story. Showed it to Bill Goodwin at the first MagicCon and he said the day before, Denis Behr had done something similar, but clearly more streamlined. Denis Behr/Pit Hartling independently worked out a similar version of Triumph -- cards mixed face up into face down, faro'd and then shown in A-K/suit order. I'm sure others have as well.
Message: Posted by: baobow (Oct 10, 2012 07:43PM)
Chappy/Dennis,
Thanks for clarifying and providing more ideas on the principle. It is something that I will definitely play around with. The invisible deck idea is great.

Cain,
Denis Behr/Pit Hartling's take on the triumph ala Messy and Master of Mess are great effects, for Dennis', the feature to bring it to a known order (mem deck order) at the end is great, as it totally eliminates the idea of a stacked deck due to the convincing shuffles and convincers that are included throughout the proceedure. Doing mem deck effects after would be very powerful, though it would be hard to do anything more powerful after such a clean Triumph as Messy is.

Baobow
Message: Posted by: Jack Crafter (Oct 30, 2012 09:51AM)
I've had a similar idea to Dennis regarding the use of Chappy's locator card. As an alternative to bringing in a brainwave or invisible deck you could bring in another memorised stack set up for a particular trick, like Diamond Jack or something. Reveal their card by whatever method you choose and then lead in to a closing effect that requires a particular set up.

You could even use it as a worse case scenario maybe if the stack got messed up somehow (hopefully it'd never happen, but I guess it's good to have a back up just in case). As long as you knew a small part of the stack was still in order you could make sure the spectator chooses a card from that section and still know what card they've chosen. From there you could happily switch in a replacement deck without having to perform some kind of sneaky deck switch something. Thinking about it, if you wanted to do effects that would mess up the stack you could use that principle as long as you retained a small stack for the spectator to choose from. Perform an effect that puts the majority of the stack out of order, cut the small retained stack to the centre. From there use Chappy's idea to find the spectator's chosen card and switch in your new stack for the reveal.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Nov 19, 2012 09:00AM)
I can't believe we've overlook this one so far. It's the use of an X-Ray Card Box. I'm thinking, of course, of the brilliant three phase mem-deck routine by Darwin Ortiz: The Zen Master. It's in his book "Scams and Fantasies with Cards" and also on the video set of the same name. Darwin says it's one of the strongest routines in the book. I agree. In fact I'd say its one of the best routines you can do with a memorized deck.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Michael J (Nov 20, 2012 06:23AM)
Hi Dennis,

This is a brilliant trick. I use a lot and always get good reactions. I agree that it is one of the best routines you can do with a memorised deck.

All the best

Michael
Message: Posted by: magicmann (Nov 21, 2012 01:01PM)
Dennis

This is a fantastic thread that I have been reviewing regularly with interest. The only point that I would add that I don't think has been mentioned is counting. Rather than having to see a paticular card you just need to know the number that have been cut off to determine the next or chosen card. A great routine by Boris Wild comes to mind.

Paul
Message: Posted by: chappy (Nov 21, 2012 02:40PM)
Hi Dennis

Another concept which I don't think has been mentioned is outlined for the first time to my knowledge in Denis Behr's 'Finding The Way Home'. Those who were not using this concept already will find a lot of fun(and time) here.

Greg
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Nov 21, 2012 03:51PM)
Thanks, Greg. Where can we find out about this? Is it a marketed item?

Denny
Message: Posted by: chappy (Nov 21, 2012 07:19PM)
It is in Handcrafted Card Magic available through Denis Behr at http://www.denisbehr.de

From the forward>
The chapter, however, that I predict will stand-out as one of the most important and influential contributions to the study of stacked-deck magic is “Finding The Way Home”.
Pit Hartling

Greg
Message: Posted by: juggernought (Nov 28, 2012 11:20PM)
Another useful tool is having an accomplice who also knows the stack. For example, I know someone whose girlfriend knows the Tamariz stack. There are many possibilities for this use ranging for ACAAN (I believe that Aronson had a good version using an accomplice) to your accomplice being able to 'guess' the card someone is thinking of (i.e. after the spectator cuts the deck and looks at the top card, you could flash the bottom card to your accomplice).

I know people often shrink at the idea of using an accomplice but I think it can be worth it. After all, performing magic is not about the method, but rather the effect.
Message: Posted by: juggernought (Nov 28, 2012 11:22PM)
Oh and another idea (from Tamariz) is using a mem deck to force a number. If a spectator cuts the deck, you can take a certain amount of cards either side which add (multiply, subtract etc) to the desired number. It does require some quick thinking though!
Message: Posted by: juggernought (Nov 28, 2012 11:27PM)
I just had another thought. I know it has been mentioned that the cards can be mixed face up and face down in a triumph effect, but face up and face down shuffling of a mem deck can be used for many other effects as well. One basic idea that springs to mind is faroing the top half into the reversed bottom half. If the cards were spread and a face down card was removed, then you could calculate the card next to it.
Message: Posted by: juggernought (Nov 28, 2012 11:33PM)
'8. Letting the spectator shuffle. There are at least two methods to restore the cards to pack order:
a) The spectator only mixes part of the stack. These cards are then recalled in a memory/mind-reading routine.'

It sound like you would recall a whole block of cards to memory (not in order), like an effect which I saw Bill Malone do. I know this is a very simple idea, you could use the memorised deck combined with false shuffles and a solid presentation to do a complete false memory demonstration of all the cards in order. I have done this many times before and it never fails to amaze.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Dec 3, 2012 02:23PM)
Hi Dennis,

If the x-ray card box could be an adjunct to mem-deck work, so might the "Invisible Eye" created by Dennis Marks and most recently produced by Dick Christian.

Woland
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Dec 4, 2012 01:34PM)
Great idea Woland. And you suggested to me the use of a shiner. A dentist mirror palmed in your hand, or a chrome cigarette case on the table, or a mirror inside of a pipe, build into a ring, in a match box, in piles of bills or poker chips, and even in the chewed end of a cigar. In mem-deck work, getting a glimpse of the bottom card of the deck is not only useful, but necessary at times. A shiner may help and may be more deceptive.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Nick Pudar (Dec 4, 2012 09:39PM)
My favorite two shiners at the dinner table:
1) table knife blade as it is sitting there
2) liquid surface of a black cup of coffee

Nick
Message: Posted by: Cohiba (Dec 4, 2012 09:56PM)
[quote]
On 2012-09-06 21:48, Cohiba wrote:
Cool thread.
17) Using a gaffed box, ala Asi Wind or Darwin Ortiz.
[/quote]

By the above post, I was referring to the X-Ray card box used by Darwin.

As far as the 53rd card is concerned, I think clarification needs to be made on what it's purpose is. To allow for faros, it's a great idea. As a means to determine a selection, there are better ways.
I would suggest either culling one of the cards that were adjacent to the selection, then glimpsing, or simply cutting the deck at the position of the removed card and glimpsing. Either of these is a lot less hassle than having an extra card in the stack - unless you want to faro after the selection is removed.
Message: Posted by: Woland (Dec 5, 2012 06:19AM)
Thanks for that black cup of coffee, Nick. Excellent!
Message: Posted by: Nick Pudar (Dec 5, 2012 08:45PM)
[quote]
On 2012-12-05 07:19, Woland wrote:
Thanks for that black cup of coffee, Nick. Excellent!
[/quote]

Cream or sugar with that coffee? :)
Message: Posted by: birdman69 (Feb 20, 2013 08:17AM)
I always use Derek Delgadio's Truffle Shuffle with my Mem-Deck work. It looks so natural.
Message: Posted by: birdman69 (Feb 20, 2013 08:23AM)
One of my favourite Mem-Deck routines is Three Card Location by Steve Ehlers'. I first read about it in Allan Ackerman's book Las Vegas Kardma, then in one of Bill Malone's DVD's (On the loose I think?). A real thinking man's fooler.