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Topic: Lassen commercial line magnetic gravity flippers coming soon
Message: Posted by: cablerock (Oct 17, 2012 05:30PM)
If you haven't seen yet, Todd Lassen has been selling beautiful (read: the most beautiful) clad coin gaffs at his website. The quality is as good as his silver line, and the price is awesome. He's going to have some Ike magnetic gravity flippers available soon, so keep an eye out.

http://toddlassen.com/commercial/?page_id=352
Message: Posted by: Oopsli1 (Oct 17, 2012 05:51PM)
Good for you mate. I was gonna post something and then I realized that my wireless network stopped working. Anyway, I guess I am the second one. You guys out there, if you haven't got a flipper coin or anything, just check out Todd's website. Everything is incredibly amazing. I just got a set of TTGF and it is indeed a collective piece. Hope you guys grow interests in them. Cheers.
Luke
Message: Posted by: Daniel Clemente (Oct 17, 2012 05:52PM)
Ha *** you guys are quick!!
Message: Posted by: GeorgeG (Oct 17, 2012 06:36PM)
6:27 PM :)
Message: Posted by: cablerock (Oct 17, 2012 06:43PM)
Ha. I was at work and clocked out at 3:30, so that's the best I could do.
Message: Posted by: tm613 (Oct 17, 2012 06:43PM)
If you are in his email list you could have bought one last week
Message: Posted by: J-Mac (Oct 17, 2012 10:18PM)
[quote]
On 2012-10-17 19:43, tm613 wrote:
If you are in his email list you could have bought one last week
[/quote]

I did. :bg:

Jim
Message: Posted by: Pzak97 (Oct 23, 2012 08:27AM)
Do you know if he offers a softened set?
Message: Posted by: J-Mac (Oct 23, 2012 11:26AM)
[quote]
On 2012-10-23 09:27, Pzak97 wrote:
Do you know if he offers a softened set?
[/quote]

In clad coins? No - you can't soften clad coins. Of course you could call him and ask about getting a custom silver flipper that is soft.

Jim
Message: Posted by: Pzak97 (Oct 23, 2012 01:16PM)
I thought you could artificially smooth them. Maybe the cladding is not thick enough to do that but it appears that James was using clad coins in this site.

[url]http://www.jamesriser.com/Magic/Softening/Coins.html[/url]
Message: Posted by: Mb217 (Oct 23, 2012 03:06PM)
Those coins sure don't look soft. :)
Message: Posted by: BanzaiMagic (Oct 23, 2012 05:01PM)
[quote]
On 2012-10-23 14:16, Pzak97 wrote:
I thought you could artificially smooth them. Maybe the cladding is not thick enough to do that but it appears that James was using clad coins in this site.

[url]http://www.jamesriser.com/Magic/Softening/Coins.html[/url]
[/quote]

I have never tried his method, but Riser knows what he is doing. Xavier Belmont also "softens" his coins - I presume in a similar way to Riser's method. Lassen usually likes to pre-select coins for the look he wants and he ends up with coins that are naturally softened (by wear). I have never heard of Lassen "softening" coins, but he has only been producing commercial clad coins for a short while. You could always call him and ask.
Message: Posted by: baobow (Oct 23, 2012 05:15PM)
The details of the coin are as sharp as they were before he started softening them, if they indeed soft, then that is definitely a revolutionary method as the coins look brand new!!!
Message: Posted by: BanzaiMagic (Oct 23, 2012 09:52PM)
The idea is to flatten and reduce the ridges (usually, but not always, around the edge) that would otherwise scrape against the ridges of other coins. A rounded surface makes less noise than a sharp edge which is why naturally worn old silver coins work so great. The pads of your fingers will, over time, gradually wear all of the ridges down to a nice rounded surface.

I would imagine that different coins have different ridges or sharp edges that would have to be artificially worn down (at least that's what I get from Jim Riser's site and from talking to Xavier). Some parts of the surface of a coin are already rounded when they are minted (such as the face of the president with a Kennedy half) and some parts of the surface of a coin are lower than other parts that rub against another coin, so you wouldn't need to sand down the entire surface, just the parts that make the noise. I don't know whether I would try it myself with a gaffed coin, particularly a clad coin, because the thickness of the silver surface is so thin. Unfortunately, Jim's website says that he will not sell artificially softened coins on his website (unless they are a part of an effect he is selling).