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Topic: Learning all the right moves
Message: Posted by: brad12d3 (Jan 1, 2013 07:34PM)
For someone who is wanting to get serious about learning sleights and card handling what resources would you recommend? Maybe a DVD that gives good visual instruction on the handling?
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 1, 2013 07:39PM)
Search out the effects you want to do first. There are tons of sleights. But it seems best to identify effects first and learn the sleights to do them.
Message: Posted by: Steven Youell (Jan 1, 2013 07:54PM)
It's my opinion that if you learned around 18 to 24 Sleights, you could probably do about 98% of the card magic in print. Somewhere around here is a thread in which I listed them. I've also written about this idea in both sets of my lecture notes. Might be helpful, if you can find one of those references.

sey
Message: Posted by: Nicholas Night (Jan 1, 2013 07:59PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-01 20:54, Steven Youell wrote:
It's my opinion that if you learned around 18 to 24 Sleights, you could probably do about 98% of the card magic in print. Somewhere around here is a thread in which I listed them. I've also written about this idea in both sets of my lecture notes. Might be helpful, if you can find one of those references.

sey
[/quote]

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=293855&forum=2

Bam.

AWESOME thread by the way. Don't just take The post and run. Look through it all.
Message: Posted by: Poof-Daddy (Jan 1, 2013 08:10PM)
Daryl - Encyclopedia of Card Slights
R Paul Wilson - Royal Road to Card Magic
2 good starters
Message: Posted by: deputy (Jan 1, 2013 08:29PM)
Card college
Message: Posted by: kentfgunn (Jan 1, 2013 08:42PM)
If you learn from video, you never get the chance to truly experiment with a sleight. You see it done one way. The amount of complex processing you do when you learn from the written word is probably more important than learning one way, someone else thinks a sleight should be done.

Find and read:

Close-up Card Magic, Lorayne,
Stars of Magic, Various
Expert at the Card Table, Erdnase

If you learn what's in any one of those books, you'll be a far better card magician than most.

Work on one trick at a time. Spend at least a month with it before you show anyone. Start looking at yourself in a mirror. Once you think you know the trick, videotape yourself. Don't look at any feedback until you put the cards down and watch the playback as a separate event from rehearsing.

Realize you're pretty awful and fix what's broken.

Do not post your haphazard attempts on youtube and ask for feedback. That's for losers. (I do it all the time!)

Don't look to anyone source for what you should learn, least of all me. I just listed the first three good card magic books I found as a kid. I do promise you there's great stuff in there. The Lorayne book probably has the most good stuff in. I found Stars of Magic's pictures very helpful though. Save the Erdnase 'til last. That book inspired the greatest close-up magician in the English-speaking world. It might do the same for you. Oh and two of the books are available as pdfs. Harry will probably sell you Close-up Card Magic if you email him. That way you can start tonight.

Start with one good book. It's what Vernon did.

Many people on this website couldn't do a decent card trick if their lives depended on it. Youell is an excellent magician. I know that guy well. I don't know anyone else in this thread and was not aiming insults at any of them. Just be careful.

One book. Don't start a collection, that's it's own trap.

Stars or Close-up Card Magic . . .

Go . . . Mirror . . . Video . . . self-evaluate . . . repeat.

Shoo, you got work to do.

KG
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 1, 2013 08:48PM)
I think our friend Harry Lorayne has stated you really need to only know three sleights. I'd ask him.
Message: Posted by: Nicholas Night (Jan 1, 2013 09:15PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-01 21:48, Atom3339 wrote:
I think our friend Harry Lorayne has stated you really need to only know three sleights. I'd ask him.
[/quote]

You mean this?

[quote]
On 2009-01-17 12:57, Harry Lorayne wrote:
Hey, you might even want to try some HL books!! I know some above will disagree, but I've said it, written it, many times. You can do miracles with only three things - a good control (that includes a good force), a good double lift, a good palm. Get those three down pat, [b]then[/b] you can go to the others. Just my opinion, folks. HL.


Okay; even some HL DVDs!
[/quote]


Found within the thread I linked.
Message: Posted by: deputy (Jan 1, 2013 09:16PM)
Agreed. Stars of magic is fantastic
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 1, 2013 09:28PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-01 20:34, brad12d3 wrote:
For someone who is wanting to get serious about learning sleights and card handling what resources would you recommend? Maybe a DVD that gives good visual instruction on the handling?
[/quote]
Start with Close-up Card Magic by Harry Lorayne.
Buy a used copy of Hugard and Braue's Expert Card Technique
That'll keep you going for your first three lifetimes.
Then, Vernon's Inner Card Trilogy, Simon's Effective Card Magic.
Dingle, Hamman, Jennings, Marlo, Ramsay, Skinner, Carney, Krenzel, Miller, Elmsley, Ortiz, Cervon, Fechter, Hofzinser.
Stay away from DVDs. Read the beginning chapters of Carneycopia to find out why.


Enjoy your journey.
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 1, 2013 09:57PM)
Actually, DVDs can VERIFY the things you learn from books. And seeing Bro. Hamman and Larry Jennings and other card greats performing their effects is a cardician's nirvana.
Message: Posted by: brad12d3 (Jan 1, 2013 10:19PM)
Thank you so much guys. You have been most helpful. Up until now I have mostly stuck with self workers and gimmicked decks. These can be great but I hate not being able to use a gimmicked deck immediately for something else and there is just so much great stuff out there that I want to be able to do but is unfortunately above my skill level. Looking forward to improving my card handling skills. :)
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Jan 1, 2013 11:05PM)
Thanks for the C-UCM plugs!! Interesting that no-one mentions that it has be re-written, updated, etc., along with four or five other books of mine in L:TCC, vol. 1. Many have told me that they learned enough impromptu, any-deck, any time, card magic from that book to last a lifetime. Well, I don't know - so check it out.
Message: Posted by: zaki_rafih99 (Jan 1, 2013 11:21PM)
HAHA @Kent for saying don't buy multiple books.. its its own trap. he's so right its scary.

I'll still add that for books structured for just learning moves, I started out with royal road and then moved on to expert card technique when the time was right. I've been fortunate in my time in magic to meet great people at key times to help direct me (12 years ago it was much harder to find good material as the internet hadn't evolved in the magic scene), but I still believe that those are great books for learning the right moves. most of the moves mentioned in SEY's post can be found in them as well.
Message: Posted by: Bicycle Rider (Jan 2, 2013 02:51AM)
This page has a lots of very good information for beginners. I hope you find it as helpful as it does to me when I started.

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=19232&forum=41&113
Message: Posted by: MagicJuggler (Jan 2, 2013 03:53AM)
I will second on not getting too many books, or videos for that matter. I learned a lot more when I was going one book at a time, one video at a time than I have after aquiring a large collection of videos (bought other people's collections, lots of good material, no time to review it all much less learn anything) I still don't have much in the way of books, but apart from a few that I never delved very deep into the books I have I know well, and several of the books I have I struggled through and learned the bulk of what interested me. That was what made me a better magician. I'd take quality over quantity any day.

You don't get better by reading books or watching videos. You get better by learning tricks and performing them and working toward perfection, no matter what source they came from.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Jan 2, 2013 09:54AM)
I have begun research on a new book which will tabulate the most frequently used moves in popular card effects. Ultimately I'll work through many DVDs and books, including: Ammar Easy to Master DVDs, Daryl's Encyclopaedia DVDs, Ackerman's Royal Road Series DVD, Card College series, most of the Lorayne Books, Royal Road, Erdnase, etc. I've a long ways to go, but based on my tabulations so far the list of basic moves which are used most often are: The Double Lift and Double Lift Turnover, the Elmsley Count, the Double Undercut, the Buckle, and the Break.

By far, the most commonly used move or sleight is the Break. So a new student of card magic would be well advised to master many ways of obtaining the break, and practice holding it and cutting to it.

To see where the book is heading, here's the list I have so far of tricks which use the Double Undercut:
Double Undercut
Effects utilizing it:
Dai Vernon’s Triumph (ETMCM #1)
Al Baker’s Poker Face (ETMCM #2)
Card Through Handkerchief (ETMCM #2)
Card Penetration and Change Cy Endfield (ETMCM #2)
Between The Palms Alex Elmsley (ETMCM #3)
Title Bout Martin Nash (ETMCM #3)
Card Stab Nate Leipzig (ETMCM #3)
Dunbury Aces Charlie Miller, Dave Lederman (ETMCM #4)
Gambler Vs. Magician Dr. Jacob Daley Version (ETMCM #4)
Henry Christ’s Fabulous Four Ace Trick Henry Christ (ETMCM #5)
The Gun Trick Ken Krenzel (ETMCM #5)
Spelling Collins Aces Martin Lewis (ETMCM #6)
Hofzinser All Backs Harry Riser (ETMCM #5)
Triple Coincidence John Scarne (ETMCM #6)

Most of the effects on the list require other moves as well and the book will also list all of the moves needed to do each effect studied.

I hope this helps you, Brad12D3.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 2, 2013 10:41AM)
Dennis, Your list verifies what I've discovered. Thanks for working on this!
Message: Posted by: craven (Jan 2, 2013 11:38AM)
From my little and personal experience I can suggest you the card college (the first and the second volumes are perfect for the basics moves) the magic book by Harry Lorayne (this book was my first about magic, I think it's wonderful for the both theory, routine and techniques). In Italian another wonderful book is "Magia delle carte" by Carlo Rossetti but I don't know if an english version is available.

Craven
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Jan 2, 2013 12:44PM)
Well, Dennis, a false shuffle and a simple force should probably appear on your list.

Now as you well know by now, there are fashions or frenzies about some moves over an extended period of time and then, something new comes up... Thus statistics over the past tend to discredit every positive evolution.

Let's discuss some moves that you didn't cover (to avoid fiery debates): at the time when everyone would do tabled card magic, the pull through and up the ladder would appear in virtually every trick. Then came the Zarrow Shuffle and about every possible tabled card trick was tried using it. Now that the performance of magic is more often performed standing (restaurant magic, street magic, business venues...) the Truffle Shuffle type is superceding the Zarrow or Pull Through type. This is one of the reasons why getting back in one's library is more useful (in my opinion) to search for effects than methods. This is also why I don't like Erdnase: no gamblers (except for cheats that betray themselves by doing so) and not even casinos shuffle cards the way Erdnase and then Marlo describe any more.

Furthermore, the young guys coming with great moves like the Tom Gagnon Spread Force or Del Gaudio Truffle Shuffle will, owing to the youth of their sleight, be statistically recorded as underused. Now I'm talking of true creations, not variant obtained by changing a minute detail just to put one's name on a move.

Also the reference (and I'm a fanatic book collector and book worm) to existing books in tems of sleights may burry great variants that aren't looked over and just overlooked: I would mention, for example's sake, Daryl's lateral Depth Illusion (or Tilt Move) that had appeared in Hierophant and is statistically absent from virutally every description of the ambitious card when masters like Tommy Wonder had adopted it without even writing about it (but we can see it on his DVDs). I could have mentionned the Vinny Marini's Top Change which is totally different and is not referenced in any book when it allows to revive the Top Change (a great great sleight). This to say that there is a risk of reduction and "cheaper" technique in statistically recording methods: it tends to suggest that the recorded moves are better when we all know that the crowd is mediocre (ok let's call it average) by statistical essence. The best proof of this danger is clearly illustrated in the name of the present thread: the most quoted moves are not systematically the "right moves".

Now Harry Lorayne as a source is an exception for his research was ahead of his time and he is therefore perfectly in our present. Even if I have a presentation style at the exact antipode of his, I always learn new things in searching in Harry's phenomenal contribution.
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Jan 2, 2013 01:16PM)
What great taste you have, Lawrence!! (Along with great knowledge.)
Message: Posted by: Maestro (Jan 2, 2013 01:27PM)
I'd started out with royal road to card magic from the library, then moved on to card college, harry lorayne books, and others.

You get a lot more bang for your buck with books starting out. Videos aren't bad, but I'd start with books.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 2, 2013 01:38PM)
Great point, Lawrence. Very well said.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Jan 3, 2013 03:38AM)
To Lawrence,

Thanks for sharing your insights. I did not give you anything like my "list" of moves/sleights as it exists right now. I merely listed a few of the moves which appear in a great many effects. I already have several dozen moves listed including several false shuffles and forces.

In a sense my project cannot ever be completed because new and truly wonderful things are continually being created. I'm not sure therefore, that a printed book should be my final goal. That's something I will be wrestling with as I continue to compile data.

There are concepts or categories of moves which are not actually moves in themselves. The idea of forcing a card is a different thing than one particular force. Different performers and effect creators make choices based on many factors. One will use a simple cross force, another picks an under the spread cull force, another utilizes the cut deeper force, and another uses a classic force. A major factor is which forces you know about and can do consistantly well. As a young magician starting out I didn't realize that the classic force could be virtually 100 percent in the hands of performers that have mastered it. Then I saw Frank Everhart and my perceptions changed. As a youngster I started to do card tricks before my hands were large enough to hide a palmed card, and I was afraid to try to get away with it.

I started this project some time ago and it went on the back burner when I started to write monthly columns for MUM. Now that my 49th and final MUM column has appeared in print, I have more time to devote to this project. My goal is just to be able to point the way for a young magician as to which moves and/or classes of moves to learn in order to be able to do some great card magic, and to provide a guide to experienced card workers when they are selecting new effects for their repertoire. I am most interested in any thoughts which my fellow Café Members have on what DVDs and Books of card magic I should include in my analyses. I've started with a few obvious choices that few could quibble with.

Finally, Lawrence, you have hit on a key element when you mention taking the working circumstances into consideration. Many professionals settle into working in one particular environment. Frank Everhart worked standing behind a bar and always had a surface to work on. Matt and Charlie Schulien did after dinner magic and worked seated at a dining table with their audiences. They didn't use a pad, but did have a table with a table cloth on it. I'll be trying to identify a lot of versatile moves and tricks which can be done under most any circumstances as clearly learning them will solve a lot of problems for card workers.

Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 3, 2013 06:00AM)
Dennis, I'm wondering why you list Ammars tapes as sources for classic effects like Vernon's Triumph.
Respectfully, Rod
Message: Posted by: Steve Friedberg (Jan 3, 2013 07:53AM)
Rod:
I won't attempt to speak for Dennis, but I can tell you that when I was starting out, Ammar's tapes pointed me in the right direction. They credited the source, and the video step-by-step instructions helped me nail what where at the time difficult moves like the Gemini Count. Now, the more you get into card work, the more you'll find that you want to check out the books which are the original sources for the material.

Incidentally, I don't buy into the entire books v. DVD debate. I firmly believe that both have their place. I personally prefer books, but understand that if Vernon and others were alive today, I believe they'd be putting out their share of DVDs as well.
Message: Posted by: Dennis Loomis (Jan 3, 2013 11:22AM)
To Rod,
Because I was working my way through the Ammar DVDs at the time and it was the first time I had logged the Triumph effect. It was not my intention to suggest that this was the first or best or only source.
Dennis Loomis
Message: Posted by: brad12d3 (Jan 3, 2013 11:32PM)
Thanks again guys. I have actually made some good progress on a few moves that I had trouble with before. You can amaze yourself with how fast you can get something if just keep drilling it for a little bit each day. :)
Message: Posted by: jpleddington (Jan 4, 2013 12:53AM)
I like Steven Youell's list (linked to above), even if I'm not a big fan of the side steal and, on the other hand, think that the DPS and variants should be included.

That said, I wanted to add that learning to do effective magic with small objects will markedly improve your card magic. So, while it's not a card sleight, I'd venture to say that no card magician worth his or her salt should be ignorant of how to do and effectively routine false transfers with small objects. A great resource for learning to do this is the first DVD in the Al Schneider Technique series.

Jason
Message: Posted by: ArturoZ. (Jan 4, 2013 12:58AM)
If you're just starting I would recomend R. Paul Wilson's Royal Road to Card Magic 5 Disc Dvd. Whats cool about it is the way its organized. He teaches you sleights and shows you tricks you can do with those sleights and as you move foward through each disk you incorporate each move and learn even more effects. By the time you are done with the Dvds you should pretty much know the basics and should even be able to come up with your own routines.

Good luck,
Art
Message: Posted by: Steven Youell (Jan 4, 2013 01:01AM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-04 01:53, jpleddington wrote:
I like Steven Youell's list (linked to above), even if I'm not a big fan of the side steal and, on the other hand, think that the DPS and variants should be included.[/quote]
Remember that the idea is to get as much mileage from the list as possible. The Side Steal has enough variants so a person could find one that fits him. The DPS (as much as I love it) wasn't included because I believe it's a bit problematic in certain situations-- much more so than the variations of the Side Steal. Your mileage may vary, but I wanted to explain my line of reasoning.

sey
Message: Posted by: jpleddington (Jan 4, 2013 01:52AM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-04 02:01, Steven Youell wrote:
[quote]
On 2013-01-04 01:53, jpleddington wrote:
I like Steven Youell's list (linked to above), even if I'm not a big fan of the side steal and, on the other hand, think that the DPS and variants should be included.[/quote]
Remember that the idea is to get as much mileage from the list as possible. The Side Steal has enough variants so a person could find one that fits him. The DPS (as much as I love it) wasn't included because I believe it's a bit problematic in certain situations-- much more so than the variations of the Side Steal. Your mileage may vary, but I wanted to explain my line of reasoning.

sey
[/quote]

I see where you're coming from, Steven.

J
Message: Posted by: Xizzy (Jan 5, 2013 07:33AM)
Giobbi is my way. I'm going through his works one step after another.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Jan 5, 2013 09:28AM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-03 07:00, magicfish wrote:
Dennis, I'm wondering why you list Ammars tapes as sources for classic effects like Vernon's Triumph.
Respectfully, Rod
[/quote]

When you look at the DVDs called Revelations which are in depth interviews of The Professor on several topics, who do you see handling the cards for a large part? Is it not Michael Ammar? So what's so surprising about learning from a great magician whose source are recognized and valuable?

I would more go with Roberto Giobbi, but would not criticize anybody choosing another path.
Daryl's Encyclopedia of card sleights DVDs are very valuable and I like his style very much
Alan Ackerman's Advanced Card Control Series covers common ground with Daryl but they also offer several different sleights from one another. Alan is more "Marloesque" and Daryl more audience driven.

Now for learning strong tricks
Harry Lorayne is a phenomenal source. It's one of the names that comes to the mind first even if his style is too challenging and too quick for my own presentations (but that's easy to adapt): His personal books and DVDs are just tremendous and Apocalypse is an incredible treasure Trove.

R Paul Wilson is a very talented card man (and close up magician) who's style seems kind of sad to me but he also teaches on a systematical basis (but again we need to adapt to our own style whatever we learn from great masters)

I have a personal strong disliking for Bill Malone's peronality which only magicians like for they psychologically project in him their own craving for offending the rest of the world thinking that this is entertainment, but there is no argument that Bill Malone is extremely skillful and a good teacher of so-called difficult sleights (and not only in "Marlo" style card magic.)

Jon Racherbaumer is rarely quoted in this type of research but he is also incredibly knowledgeable and detailed both in effects and advanced technique. His interrest ni finesses and subtleties is unmatched. I would strongly recommand not to pass his writings by.

David Solomon, Wesly James are from the same school but each one with a strong personality and some personal discoveries.

Finally I'm always puzzled not to see Dai Vernon quoted in this kind of teaching sources. Was he not recognized as one of the greatest card man of all times? Do we need to search to access his brainchildren? Are they obsolete?

Giobbi and Vernon would probably be my choice with Harry Lorayne's work and Apocalypse. Then I'd go for Jon racherbaumer in search for finesses.

Now on a specifically chosen effect I would recommand the DVDs specialized in that effect produced by L&L under the World Greatest Tricks by the Wold Greates Magicians To see a siimilar effect performed by several performer makes it easier to adapt the technique and the effect ot one's personality wihtout being too heavily influenced by one performer's style.

To conclude, it's a fact recognized by neurologists that we learn more easily from images (we create visually neuronal chains -mirror neurons-, only by watching repeatedly) than from text BUT text are more adapted for referencing effects variants and methods.
Message: Posted by: Lawrence O (Jan 5, 2013 10:19AM)
Now for pristine handling of any kind of sleight, I cannot see a better performer than JJ Sanvert (even if Martin Nash comes close second)
Message: Posted by: motown (Jan 5, 2013 10:20AM)
The Card College Books and DVDs are a good place to start. No need to learn every sleight under the sun though.
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Jan 5, 2013 11:43AM)
In most of my writings/teachings I teach the sleight only when I suggest it within an effect or routine. To paraphrase myself, as I wrote in my book, The Magic Book (which was originally written for the general public) - "I want to save you the forty years I wasted learning sleights that I never used!" Now, I wouldn't say it, but Lawrence did - so I'll copy/paste him here: "Now for learning strong tricks
Harry Lorayne is a phenomenal source. It's one of the names that comes to the mind first even if his style is too challenging and too quick for my own presentations (but that's easy to adapt): His personal books and DVDs are just tremendous and Apocalypse is an incredible treasure Trove." Thank you, sir. Best - HL.
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 5, 2013 11:52AM)
I get in Move Monkey mode once in awhile attempting to learn challenging sleights, but rarely find where to use them in context to maximize an effect. I choose not to obsess as Marlo would. Instead, I usually find easier solutions in HL's material. And most of my Card Magic success is due via Mr. Lorayne's teaching.
Message: Posted by: Harry Lorayne (Jan 5, 2013 12:04PM)
Guys - you're helping to make it all worthwhile for me!! Thanks. H.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 5, 2013 08:26PM)
Lawrence, I recommended the Inner Card Trilogy early in this thread. In another thread here I sing the praises of Michael Ammar. He is certainly a master magician. I just wouldn't list his ETMCM tapes as sources.
Message: Posted by: magicfish (Jan 5, 2013 08:55PM)
Lawrence, I recommended the Inner Card Trilogy early in this thread. In another thread here I sing the praises of Michael Ammar. He is certainly a master magician. I just wouldn't list his ETMCM tapes as sources.
Message: Posted by: nathanmorris (Jan 9, 2013 11:07AM)
Card college
Message: Posted by: Joe Momma (Jan 9, 2013 12:10PM)
A control, a palm, a double lift and a force and you'll be set.

However, the advice is right that you should work out what effects you want to do and then learn the sleights to do that. Not the other way around. Unless you just want to learn sleights as an academic exercise.
Message: Posted by: Steven Youell (Jan 9, 2013 11:47PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-09 13:10, Joe Momma wrote:
A control, a palm, a double lift and a force and you'll be set.[/quote]
[quote]
On 2013-01-09 13:10, Joe Momma wrote:
However, the advice is right that you should work out what effects you want to do and then learn the sleights to do that.[/quote]
I'm sorry, but I think both of these suggestions are horrible. I'd caution anyone [b]against[/b] taking this advice.

sey
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Jan 10, 2013 01:33AM)
Steve, What are YOUR suggestions?
Message: Posted by: alexhui (Jan 10, 2013 02:14AM)
There are no right or wrong moves in magic – as long as the move works for the performer, it is the Right move.

That said, I didn't mean we cannot narrow down our selection to certain 'essential' and standard moves. However, we should not – or never – think a particular move is a must-have otherwise we can never perform good card magic. Only does a performer not master a memorized deck or faro shuffle does not mean he is not qualified as a good performer. In nowadays magic, our perception of value is often determined by the quantity and release day but not quality. That's why we have so many 'unimportant' variations of sleights/tricks which are not superior than old methods.

So my suggestions to those who want to learn Right sleights is to pick up a certain effects and start practising them. You don't have to learn all the Right moves before performing. In doing a few good effects, you will learn how to perform as well as those rigth moves.

Alex Hui
Hong Kong
Message: Posted by: BarryFernelius (Jan 10, 2013 11:50AM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-10 02:33, Atom3339 wrote:
Steve, What are YOUR suggestions?
[/quote]

A link to Steven's suggestions was posted earlier in the thread:

http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=293855&forum=2
Message: Posted by: msc455magic (Jan 10, 2013 07:18PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-10 03:14, alexhui wrote:
There are no right or wrong moves in magic � as long as the move works for the performer, it is the Right move.

That said, I didn't mean we cannot narrow down our selection to certain 'essential' and standard moves. However, we should not � or never � think a particular move is a must-have otherwise we can never perform good card magic. Only does a performer not master a memorized deck or faro shuffle does not mean he is not qualified as a good performer. In nowadays magic, our perception of value is often determined by the quantity and release day but not quality. That's why we have so many 'unimportant' variations of sleights/tricks which are not superior than old methods.

So my suggestions to those who want to learn Right sleights is to pick up a certain effects and start practising them. You don't have to learn all the Right moves before performing. In doing a few good effects, you will learn how to perform as well as those rigth moves.

Alex Hui
Hong Kong
[/quote]

Well said, Alex!