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Topic: Raffling off a show.
Message: Posted by: Zack (Jan 22, 2013 07:50PM)
I am planning on placing ballot boxes to raffle off a show, in order to collect leads. I bout some ballot boxes, but I'm at a loss as to how to best display them. I need to comeup with a way to include the entrance card and have some kind of writing implement for them.

Anybody have any help? I've searched the web for photos of a raffle/lottery setup, but have found nothing.
Message: Posted by: David Garrity (Jan 22, 2013 08:06PM)
http://www.displays2go.com/Category.aspx?ID=115

Does this help?
Message: Posted by: Karen Climer (Jan 22, 2013 10:57PM)
I've never done this, but have thought about doing it. I will be interested to hear how it works for you. Keep us posted.
Message: Posted by: Paddy (Jan 23, 2013 06:33AM)
Confused. Are you raffling off a show, i.e. it cost $1 a ticket and winner gets a freebie, or are you having a drawing for a show, i.e. free entry and winner gets a show?
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 23, 2013 10:26AM)
I am confused as to why you would want a list of people which may or may not want your services.
Message: Posted by: charliecheckers (Jan 23, 2013 04:07PM)
I am with Danny. People who enter a free raffle are not necessarily qualified leads. They may be the type to wait for future such drawings should they not win the initial one.
Message: Posted by: Mindpro (Jan 23, 2013 04:59PM)
I agree. They are often thrifty shoppers and penny-pinchers only interested in a freebie, a deal, or will shop based on price only - all three things I try to steer away from.
Message: Posted by: Zack (Jan 23, 2013 05:30PM)
Paddy: A drawing. Free to enter, winner gets a free show.

Others: Everybody who enters a drawing for a show, wants a show. That's just axiomatic. They may not be able to pay for a show, but they definitely want it.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 23, 2013 06:05PM)
Hi Zack -

You might find some tips on this (older) thread:

[url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=196755&forum=44&start=0]--> Magic Café thread titled... Other Side of Trade Show[/url]

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Karen Climer (Jan 23, 2013 06:07PM)
The people who enter the drawing are not all guaranteed to buy a show in the next year, but they are more qualified than say a list from the phone book. It is true that some just want something for free, some are penny pinchers, some can't afford it, etc. But there will also be many who have kids, need an entertainer, and can afford it.

Zack, I commend you for trying it. One thing about marketing is that you never know what is going to work or not work until you try it. Sometimes you think you have a winner and it doesn't work, but at least you took a shot at it. That sure beats sitting around waiting for the phone to ring.

I'll be interested to hear how it works out.
Message: Posted by: charliecheckers (Jan 23, 2013 06:37PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-23 19:07, Karen Climer wrote:
The people who enter the drawing are not all guaranteed to buy a show in the next year, but they are more qualified than say a list from the phone book. It is true that some just want something for free, some are penny pinchers, some can't afford it, etc. But there will also be many who have kids, need an entertainer, and can afford it.

Zack, I commend you for trying it. One thing about marketing is that you never know what is going to work or not work until you try it. Sometimes you think you have a winner and it doesn't work, but at least you took a shot at it. That sure beats sitting around waiting for the phone to ring.

I'll be interested to hear how it works out.
[/quote]

If the only criteria is that it needs to beat "sit around and do nothing", then opening your front door and screaming at the top of your lungs "Who out there needs a magician" would also qualify as a possible marketing strategy. I just believe there are many other strategies that would be more effective. Setting up the raffle and doing a show is a huge time investment. Perhaps if this was something being done in conjunction with an event that had a ton of kids at it and you were aloud to give a pitch to the crowd about the content of your show in exchange for offering such a drawing, it would make a bit more sense. In that case I would have the drawing then and there, a winner announced and a special discount to others for shows booked within a specified period of time.
Message: Posted by: Zack (Jan 23, 2013 07:32PM)
I'm gonna position the boxes in locations where kids and parents congregate. Its a minimal investment, cheaper than a mailing campaign.
Message: Posted by: TomBoleware (Jan 23, 2013 07:56PM)
Zack, I can give you a big tip or two on the box but first, do you do birthday shows?
Asking because your site says you do corporate work.

Tom
Message: Posted by: Zack (Jan 23, 2013 08:31PM)
Yep, I do birthday shows.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 23, 2013 10:22PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-23 18:30, Zack wrote:
Paddy: A drawing. Free to enter, winner gets a free show.

Others: Everybody who enters a drawing for a show, wants a show. That's just axiomatic. They may not be able to pay for a show, but they definitely want it.
[/quote]

God is love. Love is blind. Stevie Wonder is blind. Stevie Wonder is God.

This is the logic you are using to claim that it is "axiomatic". Good luck.
Message: Posted by: magicofCurtis (Jan 24, 2013 07:06AM)
HMM, if you desire to do this, I would suggest trying to qualifying the leads.

Have a questionare something like:

How many children between the ages of 1-5
How many children between the ages of 5 and 10
How many children between the ages of 11 and 16
Birth dates of children under 16 years old?

Have you ever hired a magician or a party entertainer?
How likely would you hire entertainment in the next year on a scale of 1-10.

Also, ask a few questions about corporate, graduations,
etc
etc
etc


Just a thought, good luck.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 24, 2013 10:18AM)
Curtis you seem to be suggesting that someone actually sort out the wheat from the chaff! That way you don't throw good money after bad marketing to people with a 0% chance of it padding the ROI.

Hmmmmm that is just crazy enough to work!!!!!!
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 24, 2013 10:53AM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-23 20:32, Zack wrote:
I'm gonna position the boxes in locations where kids and parents congregate. Its a minimal investment, cheaper than a mailing campaign.
[/quote]

This post puzzles me.

How do you intend to follow up on the leads that you gather?

It sounds like you aren't intending to do mailings. Are you intending to do emails or phone calls instead? Or were you not going to follow up at all?

- Donald

P.S. On the other thread I linked to earlier, we discussed options for the "non-winners" of the grand prize. They could all get a discount coupon on a show booking, or better yet, some sort of physical prize like a magic wand along with the coupon.
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 24, 2013 11:28AM)
Yea that should excite them about magic in general.

Why is it that magicians want to underestimate the intelligence of future customers so badly? Do you think that after they have the "raffle" and give you the name and such and then get bombarded with information about you that they don't put things together? Seriously?

The threads are always about how to sneak information out of people that they may or may not want to give you on whatever shakey premise you can manage to come up with. Why not talk about how people feel about you gathering their information in the first place?

Never mind.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 24, 2013 11:44AM)
Hi Zack -

Here's another thread, that evolved into a discussion about draws:

[url=http://www.themagiccafe.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=198044&forum=44]--> Magic Café thread titled... Weekly news sheet advertising[/url]

- Donald
Message: Posted by: TomBoleware (Jan 24, 2013 12:51PM)
Zack,

If in fact you do have a show for children and you are serious about getting into the birthday business, then you need to visit some of the daycare centers in your area. But if you don't have an age appropriate show then forget it. It won't work. By the time kids are old enough to understand card tricks, etc, most are no longer interested in having a magician at their party. So to have any success at all in the birthday business, you going to have to 'target' the younger kids. You need a good age appropriate show and you need to become THE local magician. And the only way to become THE local magician is by getting your name out there. You need kids and parents talking about you. When they think of magic or party they need to think of you.

The best place to cause talk about kid activities is in the Daycare Centers. I call em the lead headquarters for getting birthday shows, simply because that's where all the mom's gather everyday and talk, talk, talk, and talk some more. Trust me, there you can find out what kids do on the weekend, where they do it, and what color mom had her nails done.

Getting to know the director and teachers at a local daycare center should be on top of your list of things to do. EVERY child there is going to have a birthday. And the odds are good that the parent will be talking to the teacher about the party. Their friends are there and they will be inviting them to come to the party.

Actually, to get a better understanding of the daycare business and how it's run, you need to read my book The Daycare Magician. :) But don't be afraid to just drop by your local center early one morning with a dozen doughnuts for the teachers, or if it's later in the day, take a bag of cookies. Introduce yourself as the 'local' magician and leave a few cards/flyers for them to hand out.

Use your drawing box idea there, Or simply ask the director to pass out the forms to the children/parents to take home.

Anyway, good luck with it and if I can be of help, just let me know.

Tom
Message: Posted by: Karen Climer (Jan 24, 2013 05:55PM)
Tom's book on Daycare Magic is great. I recommend it.
Message: Posted by: Karen Climer (Jan 24, 2013 06:00PM)
[quote]
On 2013-01-24 12:28, Dannydoyle wrote:
Why is it that magicians want to underestimate the intelligence of future customers so badly? Do you think that after they have the "raffle" and give you the name and such and then get bombarded with information about you that they don't put things together? Seriously?

The threads are always about how to sneak information out of people that they may or may not want to give you on whatever shakey premise you can manage to come up with. Why not talk about how people feel about you gathering their information in the first place?

[/quote]

I don't think is about sneaking information out of people. People know that when they enter the drawing, they will be added to a mailing list. It is a trade-off for them. If they want to win, the give up their information. If people do not want to give up their information, it is their choice not to enter the drawing.
You could even put a disclosure that says you will use their information for future advertising, and I doubt it would affect the number of entries.


On another note, I like Tom's idea of holding the drawing at a daycare. That is the perfect audience. Also, I think it was Donald who said to offer all entries a discount. But be sure to have an expiration date on it.
Message: Posted by: Ed_Millis (Jan 25, 2013 07:59AM)
I did this at a recent city-wide event. Got lotsa responses. Gave away four free birthday shows, and discounts to anyone else who entered. Contacted everyone who won and almost everyone else.

Nothing -- nada -- zip!! Not even the free people bit.

Your mileage may vary.
Ed
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 25, 2013 09:43AM)
Ed -

Are you saying the people who won the free birthday magic shows, didn't call and book them before the offer expired? That's strange.

When I gave away a free birthday magic show with my draw, years ago, I gave away the free show within the 12 months. I also got a tip at the show itself, as well as spin off work.

I also remember offering the option of upgrading the show that they won, for an extra fee, and one customer did that. I offer 2 bday packages, but only gave away the standard show package in the draw.

Did you contact the winners by phone and then mail?

Did you contact the other entrants, with the coupon offer, by mail or email? I ask this, because it's very easy to ignore an email if they haven't had any from you previously. Mail would have more impact.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: Ed_Millis (Jan 25, 2013 10:37PM)
Phone and email. Didn't get mailing addresses. Got a lot "Oh thank you! I'll contact you when it's time." Not.

Ed
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 26, 2013 12:43AM)
When I gave away the birthday party packages, I called to tell them that they won. Then I mailed a physical certificate / page with the show description, prize value, and conditions of the prize ("dates are booked first come first served, so book early", "must be used for a birthday party with less than 15 kids", "must be a birthday show in the Victoria area", "birthday shows are best for the birthday child aged 4-10, and their friends", "this certificate expires on January 25, 2014 -- must be used within 12 months", etc.) This was often sent on my letterhead. I'm sure if I hadn't mailed the certificates / page, the parent wouldn't have remembered it later on.

Again, I personally wouldn't have done this by email. I don't think it has the same impact.

I wouldn't have even sent it as an email attachment for the parent to print off. Too easy to get deleted, forgotten about, not printed off, etc.

- Donald
Message: Posted by: TomBoleware (Jan 26, 2013 07:43PM)
I agree that email is not the best way to do business with strangers.

I can see where putting a box out on the street just anywhere probably wouldn't do a lot of good. But if it's targeted at the right audience, just the publicity alone would be worth the effort. It's not that often you get to display your name and what you do right in the middle of qualified prospects. Picture the display sitting on a front desk with parents seeing it everyday for a week or more. Sure some would register more than once, and you would have to sort those out, but that only proves they are interested.

Anyway, looks like Zack lost interest in the idea and moved on. I do wish him well with whatever he does to get leads.

Tom
Message: Posted by: Dannydoyle (Jan 26, 2013 10:11PM)
I don't know how you guys do it.

Mind you this I do not mean in a bad way. The idea of finding new prospects constantly just seems quite a daunting task to me. It seems SO time consuming and VERY tough to do!

This is EXACTLY why I have concentrated my whole career on long term deals. Things that last for YEARS on end! This is how I have always done it. I can't imagine how much work goes into this type of thing. It would wear me out!

Again I mean that in a "geeze you guys work hard!" sort of way. Not in any sort of bad way.
Message: Posted by: Donald Dunphy (Jan 28, 2013 11:07AM)
Zack -

I have given info about the suggested form (asking for child's ages and birthdays but not their names, etc.), prizes, etc. on one of the links I provided. Posts I made several years ago on another thread.

We've talked above, about how to follow up with the winners. Phone and then mail a certificate. And the idea of upselling, etc.

In my opinion, you only have to send 2 pieces of mail to the other entrants.

One right after the draw, to send them the coupon (and possibly the other, smaller prize -- I mentioned wands with instruction sheets because it's one of my more popular BOR items -- not every performer has those to give away in a mailing). Maybe also let them know who the winner of the grand prize was.

And then contact them again with some basic birthday show information (and maybe even the gift of a party tips booklet), about a month or two before their child's birthday. You can even do a mention of the initial draw / coupon in that second letter, so they can remember how you got their contact information -- they gave it to you willingly.

You don't have to send them the coupon again. You don't have to give the discount if they don't have the coupon, if they haven't kept it from your first mailing. That's your personal decision.

Again, none of this is done by email. Snail mail has more impact. And wait for them to contact you to inquire about a show or to book a show. If they don't contact you, don't sweat it. You have lots of leads.

Because you are contacting parents at home, and they aren't really a prospect or customer (yet), you don't have a strong rapport with them. So, I personally wouldn't call them at all (unless they ask you to), and also not send too much mail (no newsletters, no sequencial mailings, etc.) There is a difference as to how you should handle suspects, prospects, customers, and clients.

- Donald

P.S. Danny referred to long term deals. The only types of opportunities I can think of for children's entertainers or family entertainers, are things like amusement parks, resorts, cruise ships, sponsored shows, becoming a Ronald McDonald magic clown, etc.