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Topic: Best dvd's to learn allot!
Message: Posted by: Cubby199 (Aug 9, 2013 11:31PM)
I'm a ambitious ameture magician! I want to learn all I possibly ever can about the art of magic, and someday be smart enough to give back to the community. I am wondering what DVDs cover allot of content for the price. These DVDs can be about any subject.

Thanks
Message: Posted by: mrunge (Aug 9, 2013 11:51PM)
My suggestion??? SLOW DOWN!!!

Magic is NOT about how much you know, or how fast you learn it. It's about the journey and having fun while learning.

A great place to start is with Mark Wilsons "Complete Course In Magic." NOT the "Cyclopedia" version that is a little cheaper, because it leaves out about half this book and is not worth it. Here's a link for it, but you can find it in any big box book store.

http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Wilsons-Complete-Course-Magic/dp/0762414553

Get this book. Study it. Learn a couple of effects and practice them until you have them down completely. Not just the motions, but your presentation, patter, etc... Then add another effect and work on it, then another.

It's NOT about how many effects you know, but how well you know those you do. Remember, a professional performs 10 tricks perfectly for 100 people, over and over. An amateur knows 100 tricks (and performs them poorly) for 10 people, every now and then.

Slow down, enjoy the sites along the way, think about where you are, and have fun!!

Mark.
Message: Posted by: Atom3339 (Aug 10, 2013 12:18AM)
^ Wisdom.
Message: Posted by: Dollarbill (Aug 14, 2013 12:52PM)
[quote]
On 2013-08-10 00:51, mrunge wrote:
My suggestion??? SLOW DOWN!!!

Magic is NOT about how much you know, or how fast you learn it. It's about the journey and having fun while learning.

A great place to start is with Mark Wilsons "Complete Course In Magic." NOT the "Cyclopedia" version that is a little cheaper, because it leaves out about half this book and is not worth it. Here's a link for it, but you can find it in any big box book store.

http://www.amazon.com/Mark-Wilsons-Complete-Course-Magic/dp/0762414553

Get this book. Study it. Learn a couple of effects and practice them until you have them down completely. Not just the motions, but your presentation, patter, etc... Then add another effect and work on it, then another.

It's NOT about how many effects you know, but how well you know those you do. Remember, a professional performs 10 tricks perfectly for 100 people, over and over. An amateur knows 100 tricks (and performs them poorly) for 10 people, every now and then.

Slow down, enjoy the sites along the way, think about where you are, and have fun!!

Mark.
[/quote]

+1
Message: Posted by: motown (Aug 15, 2013 10:11PM)
Al Scheinder's 4 DVD set is excellent
Message: Posted by: Cubby199 (Aug 15, 2013 10:12PM)
Thanks
Message: Posted by: Michael Rubinstein (Aug 18, 2013 08:00AM)
The New York Coin Magic Seminar DVD series contains 17 discs on 16 volumes, teaching all aspects of coin magic from 18 different coin magicians. There are over 225 routines, sleights, lessons, and theory. It is on sale at an incredible discount at http://www.newyorkcoinmagic.net . If you want to only learn better coin moves, try the Encyclopedia of Coin Sleights offered by L&L. Over 100 coin moves on all aspects of coin magic, taught in great detail. There is a great selection of card DVDs at L&L as well, and a nice series on the World's greatest magic with routines culled from their vast catalog. So you can look for a DVD for a special effect, and find it all on one volume.
Message: Posted by: calexa (Sep 11, 2013 09:38AM)
I guess a lot of people will laugh out loud but I would recommend Oz Pearlmans "Born to perform card magic". I bought this DVD a long time ago and I still watch it today. The effects are very good for beginners and the sleights are very useful, too.

Carsten
Message: Posted by: Uli Weigel (Sep 11, 2013 10:08AM)
If you want a variety of (mostly classic) effects as well as quality teaching, I'd recommend the following three sets:

1. Doc Eason's "Bar Magic" (3 DVD's)

2. Daryl's "Fooler Doolers" set (3 DVD's)

3. Johnny Thompson's "Commercial Classics of Magic" (4 DVD's)

It's all real world stuff, no pipe dreams, filled with time tested routines suitable for almost all audiences. Apart from a couple of easily obtainable standard gimmicks (C/S coin, TT and the like), all you need to perform these tricks are everyday objects like cards, coins, rope, finger rings, salt shaker, paper money etc.
Message: Posted by: iwillfoolu (Sep 11, 2013 06:29PM)
I really lucked out when I started out. My first video was a Michael Ammar Live at the Castle. Still one to watch for inspiration.

I also enjoyed Bill Malone's On the Loose and Tommy Wonder's Visions of Wonder.
The Encyclopedia of Card Sleights (Daryl) was great fodder for my youth.
I would be remiss without mentioning my 3 favorite Jeff McBride's sets (Card Manipulation, Balls, Coins and Thimbles and McBride On Stage)

It really depends on what you're into/good at. The really good stuff is in the books. Tarbell comes to mind.

Joey D
Message: Posted by: jcrabtree2007 (Sep 15, 2013 02:37PM)
Mrunge is right. Slow down and make sure you get a grasp over each effect before trying new stuff. Mark Wilson's book is an excellent place to start. It was my introduction to magic and I still use it to this day. Too many try and learn tricks so fast that they might perform many tricks but none well.
Pick a type of magic and then learn the basics of it. Whether coins, cards, mentalism- understand the principles of it.
Don't fall into the trap of just buying the latest and greatest trick at penguin (penguin is great ). Don't spend all your $$ on gaffs. Learn the fundamentals and you will have hundreds of tricks a avail to you (and the gaffs will work better for you as well)
Message: Posted by: Neznarf (Sep 18, 2013 11:33AM)
John Mendoza's DVD set is full of solid magic.
Message: Posted by: Zombie Magic (Sep 18, 2013 10:33PM)
Dai Vernon's Revelations DVD set is a must have, IMHO.
Message: Posted by: Vlad_77 (Sep 19, 2013 06:07AM)
Hi Cubby,

I hope you are following mrunge's advice to slow down. I think it's safe to say that almost all of us have been where you are in your journey in terms of unbridled enthusiasm in wanting to learn as much as you can. Here's the thing: you've already given back to the community by starting this thread! The advice that's been given by others will prove to be an invaluable resource to others who have the same enthusiasm as you!

mrunge wrote it so well I can only add one thing, and please don't be discouraged: It's been written/stated in quite a few places that magic is one of the most written about subjects in all fields of human endeavor. It may not appear so because one finds only a scant few books on magic in a regular bookstore and virtually no DVDs. But, because magic - and mentalism - have the unique aspect of secrecy that virtually no other discipline possesses in the larger corpus of all that is written and filmed, magic is very "underground." Add to that the fact that even within the mystery arts, there resources not readily available to the "general" magic public, and I think you'll get the reality that even learning as much as you can is but a fraction of what is out there. I often quote the great Stewart Judah who stated that he had been into magic for over sixty years and that he had just scratched the surface. He added enthusiastically that the scratching had been fun. :) Paul Green, a pro who is a member here and for whom I have the deepest respect always signs off his posts with "Enjoy the Search." IMHO, that little phrase is loaded with wisdom.

We do have some real scholars of the art like Etienne, Hideo Kato, Mike Caveney, Max Maven, Bill Palmer and others. These people are veritable walking encyclopedias of the mystery arts. I bet that if you ask any of them, they will tell you that THEY are still learning. Ain't it grand? :)

What you will give back to the community are intelligent questions and intelligent answers. Perhaps you will provide some insight to a sleight or an effect. Perhaps you will ask a question about a method that has been giving you fits that will spark conversations that will benefit many. In short, as mrunge, jcrabtree, and others have noted, it isn't the quantity, it's the quality.

Okay, homily over! I'll offer a few suggests too but, if I may offer one more piece of advice? Please do not restrict yourself to one medium? Ignoring books, e-books, periodicals, lecture notes, etc., is robbing yourself of knowledge you will never get from DVDs alone.

Some DVD suggestions in addition to what has been suggested already (including video downloads):

Harry Lorayne's Best Ever DVD collection: get this set and you'll have a lifetime of study with cards.

Aldo Colombini has a wealth of great video downloads on all kinds of magic, and, the best part is that all of his products are only 10 USD a pop. Aldo is a great magician and a great teacher and gracious to a fault. Check his website and you'll be in magic paradise.

Cameron Francis and Dave Forrest have produced a number of exemplary DVDs. The Forrest-Francis Project is an absolute joy, and the purposefully cheesy (I HOPE the cheese was on purpose guys) is a fun little motif. In addition, Cameron is now producing e-books with accompanying video downloads. The price for these again will not even put the tiniest scratch in your bank account.

I mentioned Paul Green earlier. If you want to work restaurants, hospitality suites, corporate, or whatever, get his DVD titled In the Trenches. Paul gives you the very same routines he uses to make a living at magic and offers a LOT of wisdom along the way. This DVD is superb Cubby. Paul was a regular columnist in Jim Sisti's great journal The Magic Menu. Before I would read any other column or effect, it was Paul's column I unfailingly turned to first and I still revisit them.

Honestly, there are too many to list. That said, with all of the suggestions you've been given, if you mastered ALL of it, you would be one of the most knowledgeable magicians in the world.

I am going to end by suggesting that you look into a few books on theory. DVDs by their nature cannot get deep into theory the way books can and let's face it, theory is every bit as important as all other aspects of magic; in fact, I would go so far to state that theory is THE most important aspect. Without it, magic is but a puzzle.

Strong Magic and Designing Miracles are two books by Darwin Ortiz that deserve serious study. While Darwin Ortiz is known as a card magician, what is written in these books applies to all magic. There is not a single effect in these books, but there is more practical knowledge in these books than Warren Buffet has money.

One Degree by John Guastaferro and Approaching Magic by David Regal combine sound theoretical knowledge and apply theory to absolutely killer effects.

There are of course even more "watoo many to list" but I am going to make one more suggestion - echoing JoeyD: the eight volume hardback Tarbell Course in Magic. Give Denny Haney a call and ask him about the Tarbell Course. He preaches the gospel of Tarbell much better than I ever could.

Best,
Vlad